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GENERAL «. \ 

w BOCKEFELUB PIM*. ** 



336 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor151426spon 



3 APR ^t 

AOt m copy* $8 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



RECFM/ 



Needs 



361 



NBC 6£i 

and 



- 




Early last year WCKT, Channel 7 in Miami, 
mailed its annual Public Service Report entitled 
"NEEDS", covering 1959. This booklet was sent 
to leaders in education, religion, government, 
professions, labor, and business. It reported on 
WCKTs efforts to meet community, educational, 
spiritual, and informational NEEDS. 

Accompanying the Report, WCKT furnished 
these leaders a questionnaire asking, "IN ORDER 
OF IMPORTANCE, WHAT ARE SOUTH 
FLORIDA'S GREATEST NEEDS AS OF NOW?" 

\niong the "NEEDS" projects recommended. 
WCKT has created and aired three 60-minute 
documentaries: CUBA ON THE MOVE— delving 
into the Cuban population influx and the prob- 
lem, of Communism; YANKEE DOLLAR— a 
study of Florida tourism; ROOTS IN SAND— a 
look at juvenile delinquency. MIAMI CON- 



DEMNED, dealing with badly-needed slum 
clearance, is being readied for 60-minute airing. 
Among 30-minute programs broadcast were 
DELEGATION FROM FLORIDA— interviews 
with delegates to the political convention; CRY- 
ING CITY — studying rejuvenation of downtown 
Miami; SILENT VOICE — comparing the Ameri- 
can free vote with non-democratic processes else- 
where; FLORIDA'S FUTURE— pointing up in- 
tegration problems. 

The "NEEDS" questionnaire inspired a cul- 
tural SHOWCASE series. These 60-minute pro- 
grams covered University of Miami music as well 
as offerings of the Miami Ballet Company, Miami 
Opera Guild, and dramatics groups. 

WCKT also broadcast thousands of announce- 
ments and hundreds of hours of community serv- 
ice programming. 



BBDO BOOSTS 
SPOT RADIO IN 
POCKET PIECE 

Long-awaited booklet 
by top user of medium 
gives it a lift with 
material on changes 

Page 37 



How to get top 
availabilities 
in a nice way 

Page 42 

Video takes the 
retail fashion 
world by storm 

Page 46 



New private 
stations spur 
Canadian tv 

Page 50 



ISCAYNE TELEVISION CORPORATION 

' CKT WCKR-AM-FM 



NATION TO NATION, 

OBJECTIVELY SPEAKING 

ON TELEVISION 




China, Cuba, Laos, the Congo, Algiers — what next? Will a 
new crisis, as these have, create new areas of disagreement 
between traditionally friendly nations? 

There has probably never been a time when better com- 
munications between people of different lands was more 
urgently needed. Not just abstract reports that filter through 
individuals — but first-hand documents of the way people live 
from day to day... of their goals and aspirations, their inner 
thoughts expressed spontaneously and directly to individuals 
of another country, another way of life. More direct contact 
must be established — now! 

It is with this conviction that INTERTEL was established 
by five television broadcasters — Westinghouse Broadcasting 
Company (U.S.A.), National Educational Television and 
Radio Center (U.S.A.), the Australian Broadcasting Com- 
mission, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and 
Associated Rediffusion, Ltd. (Great Britain). 



On a regular basis over the next 18 months, each member of 
this international federation of broadcasters will in turn 
produce a television program on a leading world problem for 
a potential audience of 281,000,000 English-speaking people 
— greatest audience ever exposed to the same public service 
program. Each program will be another cultural exchange; 
Each a viewpoint from another nation — fresh, challenging, 
most likely controversial. 

Among the many topics scheduled for programming are: 
the Canadian attitude toward Cuba... from Australia, an 
analysis of U.S. -Canadian relations ... an English view of 
the inner conflicts of France ... an American impression of 
how the ordinary Englishman lives today, and what he can 
look forward to. 

At a time when the world is in such critical need of greater 
mutual understanding and positive acts for peace, WBC 
believes INTERTEL goes far to satisfy this need. 



Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, Inc. 



WBZ, WBZ-TV, Boston . WJZ-TV, Baltimore . KDKA, KDKA-TV. Pittsburgh • KYW, KYW-TV, 
Cleveland • WOWO, Fort Wayne • WIND, Chicago • KEX, Portland, Ore. • KPIX, San Francisco, y ^^^ 




Weed & Company — for 25 years the foremost United States repre- 
sentative for Canadian stations — is pleased to announce publica- 
tion of a new brochure, 

"CANADA IN THE SIXTIES... 
THE 300 BILLION DOLLAR CHALLENGE." 

Prepared as a hand-book for United States advertisers and their 
agencies, this brochure answers the questions most often referred 
to Weed & Company regarding Canada as an advertising market 
and Canadian television as an advertising medium. 

Your Weed salesman — located in 14 key United States buying 
centers — has a copy of this brochure for you. If you prefer, you 
may obtain your complimentary copy by writing to: 

WEED & COMPANY, 579 Fifth Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. 




Whatever 



fV , r|'i" l |'r7'| l l'l l |'l , l' 



you use 

WDBO -TV 

CH.6* CBS • ORLANDO 

is DOMINANT 

1st in 
CENTRAL 
FLORIDA 

NIELSENDEC.1960 

Metro Share 



ST A. 


MON 


-FRI. 


SUN. 


SAT. 


12-3PM 


3-6PM 


6-9PM 


9-Mtd. 




% 


% 


% 


% 


WDBO 


59 


51 


49 


47 


'B* 


27 


23 


27 


26 


'C 


13 


24 


22 


24 



Homes Reached 



STA. 


MON.- FRI. 


SUN. SAT. 


12-3PM 


3-6PM 


6-9PM 


9-Mid 


WDBO 
'B' 
'C 


(00) 

277 

128 
53 


(00) 

279 
128 
108 


(00) 

515 
316 
237 


(00) 

387 
215 
203 



ARB- NOV. 1960 

(9AM MIDNIGHT, SUN. thru SAT.) 

Metro Share 



WDBOTV DELIVERS 

• 36.4% more than Sta.'B' 
•97.3% more than Sta.'C 



Homes Reached 



WDBOTV DELIVERS 

•29.7% more than Sta.'B' 
•64.4% more than Sta.'C 



BLAIR TVA has more FACTS! 



. Vol. 15, Vo. // • 3 APRIL 1961 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USB 



NEWS FEATURES 

6 Wwsmakri dI tin- \\ eek 
23 Sponsor-Scope 
29 Sponsor-Week 
71 Washington Week 



72 Film-Scope 
66 Sponsor-Week Wrap-Up 
66 Sponsor-Week in Pictures 
80 1 v and Radio Newsmakers 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

BBDO boosts spot radio with new 'pocket piece' 

37 Top agency customer is mailing-oul primer to its clients in an attempt 
to lireak down long-held theories and show medium's present strength 

How to get top avails in a nice way 
42 Budweiser flew down a group of midwest reps to balmy Florida to 
nail down prime availabilities for its upcoming summer promotion 

Five-year report on spot tv growth 

44 Hefty growth revealed in TvB-Rorabaugh study; 1960 totals 50% ahead 
of amount invested in 1956: announcements' share up, programs down 

Tv takes the fashion world by storm 

46 Print-minded stores like Macy's, Montgomery Ward, Alexander's. Ohr- 
baeb's. Hess Bros., are "delighted" with results of local tv fashion shows 

'If you can't beat them . . .' 

49 Virginia motion picture exhibitor packs *em in by sinking 75% of ad 
budget into television; gets boost from station personality's appeararu is 

Canadian tv: a second birth 

50 Willi the opening of the ninth new major market free-enterprise station, 
l'. S. advertisers now have an alternative to overcrowded CBC network 



FEATURES 

1 O Sponsor Backstage 

14 J9th anil Madison 

18 Timebuyers at Work 

81 Seller's Viewpoint 

5 2 Sponsor Asks 



62 Radio Results 
74 Sponsor Hears 
82 Sponsor Speaks 
54 Spot Buys 
82 Ten-Second Spots 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation, and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 149 6- Madison) New York 17. Telephone Murray Hill 
8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Av. (11). Phone: Superior 7-9863. Birmingham 
Office: 3617 8th Av. So. Phone: FAirfav 2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Blvd. 
-28'. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Av., Baltimore 11, Md. Sub- 
scriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere countries $9 a year. Other 
foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all correspond- 
ence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by SPONSOR Pub- 
lications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



©1961 SPONSOR Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 




BE A 

PENNY 

PINCHER 



OF DISTINCTION! 



Look at KTVU! 

You get a lot more— for a lot less— when you buy this 
San Francisco Bay Area station. The lowest rates. 

Excellent availabilities in prime time, or in high-rated 
shows that are just right for your sales message. 

A clean run for your money with no forced 
combinations— no triple spotting. 

The most attractive discounts in the Bay Area. 

Phone KTVU or H-R Television Inc. and tell us 
what you want. Then make your own comparison. 



KT 




CHANNEL 






SAN FRANCISCO • OAKLAND 

One Jack London Square, Oakland 7, California 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 




a jump 
ahead in the Phoenix area 

KRIZ reaches 
more homes in the Phoenix 

metropolitan area 
in the course of a week than 

any other station.* 

Based on seven days 
a week, 24 hours a day, 
KRIZ reaches 43.7% 
of the total radio homes in 
the nation's fastest- 
growing city. 

'Cumulative Pulse Audience — Phoenix. Arizona 
(Metropolitan area 1 . November, 1960. 

KRIZ 





NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



call robert e. eastman & co., inc. 



' 



The newest national station representative firm. Television 
Advertising Representatives, is taking final shape as a sepa- 
rate hut subsidiary company of the \\ estinghouse Broadcast- 
ing Co. with election of harry Israel as president, succeeding 
Donald H. McGannon, WBC president who becomes TvAR 
board chairman. Storer has also formed its own rep firm. 

The newsmaker: Larry Israel, v.p. and general manager 
of the new Westinghouse representative organization since Decem- 
ber, 1958, takes over the post as TvAR president with the assistance 
of two able-bodied new executive officers: Robert M. McGregy, ex- 
ecutive v.p., and Lamont Thompson, v. p. in Chicago. 

The two-year-old firm, which previously represented only the five 
owned and operated tv properties of Westinghouse, is expanding its 
sales and service facilities to in- 
clude representation for other 
video facilities. The current tv 
line-up: WBZ-TV, Boston; KDKA- 
TV. Pittsburgh; WJZ-TV, Balti- 
more; KYW-TV. Cleveland, and 
KPIX, San Francisco. 

Israel has been with WBC in an 
executive capacity since 1057. 
when he joined the o&o sta- 
tion, WJZ-TV, Baltimore, as gen- 
eral manager. He's credited by his 
management with upping the sta- 
tion from third market position to 
first after take-over because of a 
"drasticalh " revised program schedule — and in a short time. 

Before joining WBC. Israel worked as v.p. and general manager 
of WENS, the tv station in Pittsburgh which he helped put on the 
air in 1953, and for KMGM-TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul. In 1948 he 
entered the broadcast business with WDTV. now KDKA-TV. WBC's 
Pittsburgh outlet, as — successively — news and special events editor, 
operations manager and sales manager. 

Israel was born in McKeesport. Pa., where he spent his earl) years 
and from which he emigrated to the Midwest for studies at the Uni- 
versity of Missouri's journalism school. His first post-college jobs 
were as a reporter for a Philadelphia newspaper and broadcast 
facility. 

Since then he has experienced a logical metamorphosis to sales- 
man of the type which insists on solid backing of station and cost 
data with specific marketing information for agencies and clients. 

The 42-year-old company president lives in Scarsdale. a West- 
chester suburb, with his wife and their two youngsters, Susan and 
Howard. ^ 




Larry Israel 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1<W)1 




MICH HALF? John Wanamaker, founder of the Philadelphia store bearing his name, once said only half his advertising expenditure did any good-but he didn't know which half. 
Here Mr. and Mrs. Metrodelphia are listening to part of the good half on WIP, just before they pass through Wanamaker's "carriage entrance." 

Confidence Begins at Home. Philadelphia retailers do much of their 
selling on WIP, and with good reason. 40 years of unparalleled public service speak for the 
past. And Metropolitan's fresh concepts of news, service and showmanship are rapidly moving 
WIP to the foremost audience position in Philadelphia. More and more national advertisers, 
too, are doing their shopping on . . ."WIP, Metrodelphia, Pa. 



A station of the Metropolitan Broadcasting Corporation. Harvey L. Glascock, V.P. & General Manager. Represented nationally by Edward Petry. 



IT STARTED 

BACK HERE IN 

JULY 1955- 











mm> 



-AND IT'S stillgoing strong. This eye-catching 
pattern of audience leadership represents 136 con- 
secutive Nielsen reports* Interrupted only twice in 5% 
years, it shows that one network consistently delivers 
the biggest average audience in television. CBS® 



•NATIONWIDE,6-ll PM 



GOOD 
NEWS! 

6 out of 10 copies 
of SPONSOR go to 
BUYERS OF TIME! 




by Joe Csida 



■ .':, ,.■: _::ct 



10 




Plea for 'blue ribbon' programing 

\\ hen I did m\ (> March piece commenting 
on Governor LeRo) Collins' maiden speech be- 
fore the Joint Boards of the National Associa- 
tion of Broadcasters I full) intended to make no 
Further comment on the attitudes and philoso- 
phies of the NAB's new president until he sub- 
mitted his plan for reorganization to the Asso- 
ciation in June. However, as urn know, just last 
week. 15 March (this is being written on the 22nd), the distin- 
guished new leader of the broadcasting trade group got up before 
Radio and Television Executives' Society and made another speech. 

I m an ardent RTFS member, and 1 make most of the luncheons, 
but the da\ the Governor was talking I was soaking up some sorely 
needed sun beside the pool at the La Rada in San Juan, Puerto Rico. 
I have, however, read the Governor's remarks carefully, and dis- 
cussed them with a number of industry people, whose judgment I 
respect and consider moderately objective. 

In bis first talk to the Broadcasters in February, the Governor 
said that he hoped to see that the NAB "becomes involved more ef- 
fectively in improving the kind and quality of programing in prime 
time, the extent as well as the nature of advertising and the machin- 
ery for assuring effective self-discipline in all these areas." 

Last Wednesday the Governor apparently decided to go a touch 
further. He said that he would like to see the three television net- 
works. ABC. CBS and NBC put on about two hours each of what he 
called "blue ribbon'" programing in prime evening hours. He de- 
fined what he meant by "blue ribbon programs." They should be, 
he said, "very high level ... in such areas as outstanding drama, 
fine music, public information and education . . . programing 
which, through its very .quality, will prove highly entertaining to 
substantial segments of the audience." 

In the Februarv maiden speech, the Governor also was kind 
enough to offer this advice negatively about the kind of program- 
ing the industry should do: ". . . if any program is an influence for 
debasement and is inimical to the public welfare, regardless of how 
popular, in my opinion its public broadcast cannot be justified." 

Suggestions from another source 

Strangely enough, during roughly the same span of time in which 
the new head of the broadcasting industry's trade association has 
gone to great lengths to spell out. as he sees it, the kind of pro- 
graming the industry should do, another very eminent and distin- 
guished gentleman with no prior programing experience, has let it 
be known that he is not particularly happy with the kind of pro- 
graming the broadcasting industry has presented to the public. At 
least he has let this be known to the degree that he feels some studies 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



of local programing needs should he made. And he has further let 
it be known that he feels it is fully within the area of responsibility 
of the Federal Communications Commission to have a voice in the 
kind of programing broadcasters put out. I refer, of course, to the 
Commission's own new Chairman. Mr. Newton N. Minow. 

I do not recall a single previous occasion in twenty-seven years as 
a close observer of the broadcasting scene, when the head of the 
NAB and the head of the FCC both decided at the same time to coun- 
sel the broadcasters on the kind of programs they should carry. 

It seems a little ironic to me that all this fine counsel should be 
forthcoming at a time when CBS-TV has just let it be known that it 
intended to continue to carry Eyewitness to History, CBS Reports 
and Twentieth Century regardless of whether Firestone continues to 
sponsor the first, or Prudential the last of the three. Cancellations 
seem imminent on both of these, and it is entirely possible that the 
Paley-Stanton network will find itself carrying on a sustaining basis 
three shows which I think Governor Collins would admit fit his 
definition of "blue ribbon programing" and "very high level in the 
public information area." 

A fairly good guess at the cost to the network of carrying these 
three shows (production, time, etc.) would be somewhere around 
$15,000,000 per year. NBC, too, is probably carrying more pub- 
lic information and important world affairs shows in prime time 
than ever in its history. And even ABC is doing more in these areas 
as the) secure an increasingly firmer financial foothold on the ladder 
of network competition. 

Possibly the networks and broadcasters don't mind these program 
suggestions from the new head of their trade association and the 
Chairman of the FCC. Personally it makes me a little uneasy. 

Elaboration slated for future 

Possibly this isn't the best week in the world for me to be worry- 
ing about what I have always considered to be the very essential 
freedom of programing which I think responsible broadcasters must 
have if we don't want to risk government control of radio and tv. 

Judging from the mail. I've got other problems. You may remem- 
ber that I did a column on the jingle business 20 February. I was 
careful to point out that the piece was by no means intended as a 
complete or definitive presentation of the jingle industry and all the 
firms in it. Little good that did me. Mr. James C. Wells, president 
of Futursonic Productions, Inc.. of Dallas, Texas, wrote me: 
". . . We were indeed disappointed to receive no mention in your 
column on the 'Jingle Saga.' Futursonic produces at least as many- 
musical jingles as any other like firm in the world. . . ." Mr. Wells 
then supplied me with extremely interesting operational data. 

My old friend, Al Sambrook, manager of RCA Recorded Program 
Services was a little more petulant. He wrote: "Dear Joe: 

"I read your column about radio jingles, their development, 
sources and distribution. My comment is that you certainly should 
have investigated the development, sources and distribution a little 
more because there are other factors in that regard such as tran- 
scription libraries whose total production and distribution are tre- 
mendous and by far the greater." 

But that's all Al said. Not a word more, nor any printed pieces, 
press releases, promotion material or what have you about the ex- 
cellent Thesaurus and Syndicated Sales operations of his estimable 
organization. Nevertheless, when I get a little more time maybe 
I'll explore the entire history of the jingle business, its "develop- 
ment, sources and distribution" and do another piece. ^ 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



you can t cover 
ATLANTA 

without 

WAOK 

America's 

Most Powerful 

24 HOUR 

Negro Station 

SALES RESULTS THRU 
POWERFUL PERSONALITY 
PROGRAMMING 

featuring a concentration of dy- 
namic hometown personalities with 
81 years of combined proven air- 
selling experience! 

WAOK 

ATLANTA 

For Details And Avails Contact 

Daren F. McGavren Co. or Stan 

Raymond— WAOK— Atlanta, Ga. 

Buy In Combination With 

WRMA, Montgomery, Ala. 



WTRF-TV 



STORY 
BOARD 




T. R. Effic! 



AS THE X-RAY specialist 
walked down the aisle to say 
the marriage vows with a for- 
mer patient, someone whis- 
pered: "I wonder what he saw 
in her?" (Thanks to the Harris- 
burg Tiltons) 

Wheeling wtrf-tv 
DID YOU HEAR about the girl with the gleem 
in her eye . . . her husband nudged her while 
she was brushing her teeth. 

wtrf-tv Wheeling 
A RIPE OLD ACE is nothing to brag about. 
Consider the tomato. 

Wheeling wtrf-tv 
THIS MESSAGE MAY HELP . . . just think 
about it ... a priceless pearl was once some 
oyster's ulcer. 

wtrf-tv Wheeling 

THIS MESSAGE means RESULTS . . . your 
advertising gets across to the big and spending 
audience when it's transmitted to the Wheel- 
ing-Steubenville Industrial Ohio Valley by 
WTRF-TV from Wheeling, Merchandising, too 
. . . just ask Hollingbery. 

Wheeling wtrf-tv 
ANCIENT ROME DURING THE REIGN OF 
NERO . . . two Romans met to discuss plans 
to burn down the city. "Let's abandon our 
plans; rumor has it that Nero himself plans 
to set fire to Rome. Let him do it for us," 
one of them said. "Why wait for Nero?" re- 
plied his companion. "If we do it oursetves, 
we can eliminate the fiddle man." 

wtrf-tv Wheeling 
OVERHEARD . . . "All she got out of the 
evening was rum and coax." 

Wheeling wtrf-tv 

viODERN PROFILES . . . When the teacher 

asked little Greg Frank who was the Great 

Profile, he answered "Alfred Hitchcock!" 

Rep George P. Hollingbery 



CHANNEL 
SEVEN 



WHEELING, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



11 



Flint-Bay City-Saginaw moves into the top 40 

(in actual TV homes delivered) 



You see, what were once two eastern Michigan 
markets— Flint and Bay City-Saginaw— are now 
listed and officially recognized as one. So this 
moves this heavily populated urban area way up 
among the 40 largest TV markets in the country.* 



Right in the same neighborhood with Providence 
Charlotte, Denver and New Orleans. 
And that's in terms of homes actually delivered 
people watching television, not just set owners 
It's a market with money, too. Even a little bettei 




SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 19< 



1 



off than some of its new top-40 neighbors. SRDS 

reports, for example, nearly $200 more to spend 

per household than the national average. 

How do you reach it? The only way, really, is from 

within the market area. 

For the very latest figures we have show that 

far-away Detroit stations no longer give you the 

eastern Michigan audience. It's the stations within 

that deliver the viewers today and, we're glad we 



can add, at a most appealing cost. That's where 
we are, of course— within the market area. Our 
transmitter is only 20 miles from Flint, 12 from 
Saginaw and 25 from Bay City. With City-Grade 
service to all three. To reach us, and to get all 
the figures on the nation's newest top-40 market, 
just call Harrington, Righter & Parsons, Inc. 
Offices in New York, Chicago, Detroit, Boston, 
Atlanta, Los Angeles and San Francisco. 

*ARB-March, 1960 (Sun. -Sat., 6-10 p.m.) 




SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 1961 



13 



49th and 
Madison 



One hit — one error 

Enjoyed your rundown on baseball 
coverage in the 20 March issue but 
noticed a little error in our Cleve- 
land call letters. They should read 
\\ JW TV, not WJY-TV. 

George B. Storer. Jr. 

v.p. for television operation 

Storer Broadcasting Co. 

Miami Beach. Fla. 

Program background 
Main thanks for the article "How tv 
looks to a retired veteran" published 
in the 6 Februan issue of SPONSOR. 
You did an excellent job of report- 
ing. 

For the record: there are two 
slight discrepancies, neither one of 
which is really of sufficient impor- 



tance to warrant comment. However, 
someone might challenge the facts, in 
which case you should be armed with 
the particulars. 

In the opening paragraph I am re- 
ferred to as a "veteran sales execu- 
tive." Although, during the past 40 
years, salesmen and sales depart- 
ments have reported to me, I have 
never regarded myself as primarily 
a sales executive. I have felt that my 
forte was station management, sta- 
tion relations and general adminis- 
tration. 

The last paragraph states that 1 
began broadcasting as "manager of 
KYW and continued with that sta- 
tion when it was sold to NBC and 
became WMAQ."' KYW was started 
by Westinghouse in Chicago in Oc- 




WAVE -TV viewers have 
28.8% more TIRED FACES 

— and they buy 28.8% more cosmetics, 
toiletries and beauty aids in general! 

That's because WAVE-TV has 28.8% more 
viewers, from sign-on to sign-off, in any 
average week. Source: N.S.I., Dec, 1960. 

CHANNEL 3 • MAXIMUM POWER 

NBC 

LOUISVILLE 

NBC SPOT SALES, National Representatives 




lober 1921. WMAQ came on the air 
i with the original call letters of 
WGl I on April 13, 1922. 1 estab- 
lished the station for The Chicago 
I)ail\ News within a few weeks after 
1 had been made The I)ail\ News' 
first radio editor in January 1922. 
\\ \l \( v ) was sold to NBC in Novem- 
ber. 1931 and I chose at that time to 
remain in broadcasting rather than 
returning to newspaper work. 

William S. Hedges 
24 Ross Road 
Scarsdale. N. Y. 

Valued support 

May I use this letter to \ ou for three 

purposes? 

First, let me thank vou and many 
other advertising publication editors 
for the wonderful editorial support 
you have given the Academy during 
these first three years of existence. 
It has been help such as this that has 
built our membership to nearly 200 
advertising educators. 

Second, I have enclosed a copy of 
our 1961 Yearbook that has been 
sent out to over 2,500 interested edu- 
cators and practitioners. It's our 
first visual calling card. 

And last, will you please publish 
the dates of our annual convention in 
your column, "Trade Dates." This 
will be our first meeting in the West 
and we certainly want a good rep- 
resentation. 

June 25-29 — American Academv 
of Advertising, University of 
Washington. Seattle. Washington 
Billy I. Ross 
national dean 
University of Houston 
Houston. Texas 



Audience reach important 
On behalf of the Board of Directors 
of The Advertising Council. I would 
like to take this opportunity to thank 
you for your generosity in running 
the Council's two-page annual adver- 
tisement in sponsor. 

We are most appreciative of this 
donation of space which helps us to 
familiarize a great many people with 
the work of the Council. The audi- 
ence your magazine reaches is one 
which we feel is particularly impor- 
tant. 

Theodore S. Repplier 

president 

The Advertising Council 

Washington, D. C. 



14 



sponsor 



3 APRIL 1961 







WITH 

WBT RADIO 

YOU FOCUS 

ON THE 

ONE WHO 

PAYS THE 

BILLS 





The girl in the foreground could probably recite the nation's top 98 records with her eyes closed. Her mother 
is one of the nation's adults who receives and controls 98% of the U. S. income.* Which customer are you 
after? WBT, Charlotte's over-all top audience radio station for 20 years, also has a higher percentage of 
grown-up listeners than any other Charlotte station. Adults turn to WBT because of responsible programming, 
outstanding service, and the South's finest radio talent. If you want to make sales for your clients, it makes 
sense to order the nation's 24th largest radio market. There's $2,690,786,000 worth of spending money in 
the WBT 48-county basic area,** most of it controlled by adults . . . and WBT has more of the adult listeners. 



WBT RADIO 
CHARLOTTE 

Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 



Source: "U- S. Dept. of Commerce. **Nielsen Coverage Service, Number Two and Sales Management's Survey of Buying Power, 1960. 




1960 



these 20 top local and national spot advertisers on WBBM-RAE 



AMERICAN AIRLINES 

Programs and Announcements 


COCA-COLA 

Programs and Announcer 


ANHEUSER-BUSCH 

Announcements 


REUBEN H. DONNELLEY CORK 

Announcements 


CHRYSLER CORPORATION 

Programs and Announcements 


FORD MOTOR COMPANY 

Programs and Announces 


CITIES SERVICE 

Programs and Announcements 


GENERAL MOTORS CORP. | 

Programs and Announcer 


CLARK OIL & REFINING CORP. 


THEO. HAMM BREWING Co] 


Announcements 


Programs and Announcenr^^^H 




WBBM Radio's solid LIVE SHOIFmanship and motivating 
LIVE 5/IL£Smanship produces SALES RESULTS year after 
year! That's the reason so many of America's gilt-edge 
advertisers continually depend on WBBM Radio to move 
their products or sell their services in the nation's second market. 

Call Bill Connelly, WHitehall 4-6000 or CBS Radio Spot Sales 




RADIO 

CBS IN CHICAGO 
CHICAGO'S SHOWMANSHIP STATION 



RADIO 
BASICS 

AM & FM 



You'll find comprehensive 
data on in and out of home 
listening, SPOT and network 
trends, set production, sea- 
sonal changes, hour by hour 
patterns and the unique and 
growing auto audience. 

It should be on every desk 
of every one in your shop 
who is in any way involved 
in the purchase of radio 
time. They're so reason- 
ably priced you just can't 
afford to be without them. 



ORDER 

YOUR 

REPRINTS 



NOW 





FILL COUPON 
WE'LL BILL YOU LATER 

Price Schedule 

1 to 10 40 cents each 

10 to 50 30 cents each 

50 to 100 25 cents each 

100 to 500 20 cents each 

500 or more 15 cents each 



■sponsor reader service • 

40 E. 49th Street, 
1 NAME 


RADIO 

N.Y. 17, 


BASI 

N.Y. 


"1 


FIRM 


| ADDRESS 






QUANTITY 
















Timebuyers 
at work 




Lucille Widener of Victor & Richards, Inc., New York, feels that 
"the advantages of working for a small agenc) are numerous. The 
responsibilities are numerous too. The buyer work? direct U with the 

media director and meets all the (Mints personally. In a recent article 
on timebuyers, a vice presidenl and media director of a large agencj 
admitted that the buyer, unfortu- 
nate!), rarel) sees the client in or- 
der to explain win program B is a 
better buj than \. even though B's 
cpm is higher than \">. The small- 
er agencj timebu\er has a chance 
to explain the win's and where- 
fores of a buy. The promotional 
pieces that are sent in b\ stations 
to the timebuyers are very impor- 
tant. Last \ear. a station in Salt 
Lake City, I tah. sent a success 
story in on their morning man. He 
had received thousands of orders for a certain mail order item. \\ e 
filed this — not only in the files but in the back of mu mind. \\ Inn 
the next radio campaign got under wa\ for one of our client-, we 
ordered this morning schedule and ran for weeks and weeks. Result 
— the station got hillings and we recehed order-. It is a good idea 
for representatives to send success stories and promotional pieces." 

Carole Lewis of Papert, koenig. Lois. New ^ oik. points out. "The 
trend among advertising agencies, large and small, towards men- 
creative copy places an added responsibilih on timebuyers. Obvi- 
ously, the necessit) to put more originalit) into commercials, to 
make each sell more effectivelv. is a result of our more competitive 

economy. Each expensive unit of 
time must work harder if it is to 
produce the same amount of net 
profit for the advertiser. I his 
extra effort cannot he limited to 
the creative department. ^ ith bel- 
ter tools to work with, better ra- 
dio or television commercials, the 
Inner has an even more stringent 
responsibilit) to put them to best 
use. The content of the commer- 
cials, the particular appeal of their 
selling approach, must be con- 
sidered in selecting time, programs and stations that will most accu- 
rately match their direction. This blending of product character- 
istic -. creative direction and appropriate media selection can be a 
mosj stimulating challenge to a timebuyer — especially when one add- 
to the blend, "And don't forget, keep the cost per thousand down. 







SPONSOR 



3 APRIL l'Xd 



1 




Well, we decided one thing, anyhow: 

we include Huntington -Charleston and WSAZ-TV. 



MORE AND MORE sales and advertising managers are putting the HUNTINGTON -CHARLESTON 
market on their must-buy lists. Reasoning: This Dynamic Circle pulls together 72 counties in 4 states, an 
area of concentrated industrial might in the heart of the "American Ruhr" region of the great Ohio 
Valley. The two million industrious people who live here earn $4 billion in annual payrolls. WSAZ-TV is 
theonlyjjHg/f advertising medium that covers the nearly 500,000 TV « m / f— x jy ■ i % i 

homes in the area. For this market was created by WSAZ-TV's power \J\/ y"" ") AA S — \ \/ 
and programming. Your Katz Agency man will be glad to tell you more. 




HUNTINGTON 



CHARLESTON 



CHANNEL 3 NBC 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



19 




mu 



The Embassy of Greece 



Mrs. George Denby, daughter 
of His Excellency, the Ambassador 
of Greece to the United States, 
photographed at the Embassy of 
Greece in Washington, D. C. . . . 
another in the continuing 
WTOP-TV series on the 
Washington diplomatic scene. 







REPRESENTED BY CBS TELEVISION SPOT SALES 



WTOP-TV, Channel 9, Washington, D.C. • WJXT, Channel 4, Jacksonville, Florida • WTOP Radio, Washington, D.C. 



y^i^ir:'*^ 



«m 



Wrtefsm 




W vl. mM, 



# 



..s jtmm* 






/ 




Mail is usually a good barometer of one's popularity. Yet, because wpix-11 has no 
we're more popular with advertisers! An extraordinary statement except when 
you understand the kind of mail we mean: Xo Mail Order Advertisers! wpix-11 
advertisers are national, representing the foremost advertisers in the land. 
General Motors. General Foods, P & G, Coca-Cola. R. J. Reynolds — they're all 
here in quantity. It makes good sense to join in the fine company of national 



advertisers on wpix-11. 



JT here are your 60 second commercials tonight 



NEW YORK'S PRESTIGE INDEPENDENT 




Interpretation and commentary 
on most significant tv/radio 
and marketing news of the week 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



3 APRIL 1961 

Copyi-iiht 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The big focus on the week : the continuing brisk upward trend of national spot 
tv buying for the second successive week. 

As a result of this sharp upsurge in calls and orders major reps have radically revised 
their previous estimates of March, April, and May business. Some think that even June 
will turn out substantially above expectations. 

They make this reservation: March 1960 was such a disproportionately large 
month that some stations may not show much of an increase. 

The action on availability calls and confirmations the past w r eek was fairly evenly 
spread between New York and the midwest. 

New York tv business included P&G's Duz (Compton), 49 weeks, 5-10 minutes day 
and night each per station; Avon Cosmetics (Monroe Dreher) ; Palmolive soap (Bates), 52 
weeks, day and night minutes, chainbreaks; American Home Instantine (Compton) and Sani- 
Flush (Bates); Ivory Liquid (Compton); Calumet baking powder (FCB). 

Chit of the midwest: Kool-Aid (FCB) ; Kellogg (Burnett), all products in major mar- 
kets, 10 weeks; Rust-Oleum (O'Grady, Anderson, Gray) ; American Dairy (Campbell-Mith- 
un) ; Amoco (D'Arcy), eight weeks, about 70 markets; Continental Casualty (Hartman), 15 
markets. 



In view of Ford's new approach to tv, spot has every chance of becoming an 
important item on that giant's advertising menu. 

How spot fares, of course, will depend in large measure on the response that the auto- 
motive firm gets from the networks to the position it has delineated concerning the use 
of that medium. That position, in sum, is this: 

• Ford will no longer obligate itself to maintaining a flat level of billings on a year- 
around scale. 

• The new pattern will be — lay it on very thick the last quarter of the year, thin out 
a little the first quarter of the year, reduce advertising perceptibly the second quarter and 
push very little during the summer. 

• Because of the basic economics of the auto field, it is imperative that the networks apply 
an all-out dollar discount instead of figuring in continuity also (ABC TV already 
does it). 

The foregoing is all part of a long-range plan that Ford has adopted for its advertis- 
ing strategy and general marketing. In light of the fact that NBC TV, for all intents and pur- 
poses, has let Chevrolet take a 13-week hiatus — the first such granted — from its Sunday 9-10 
p.m. slot has made Ford confident that the networks will go along — partially, if not 
completely. 

Madison Avenue reaction : CBS TV and NBC TV will likely take a long, long look 
at the discount angle since it involves a most basic principle in their economic structure. 



Some agency marketingmen see something that happened this past winter as 
boding well for retailing and advertising this spring. 

They note that because of the severe snowstorms and sub-zero weather in January and 
February, and even March, people didn't get out to shop for other than necessities. 

This built-up mound of spendable cash, the marketers add, will gravitate rapidly to- 
ward the retail marts handling durables as the weather turns better for shopping. 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



23 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The midwest accounted overwhelmingly for the past week's new activity in spot 
radio. 

Among the accounts: Campbell's Barbecue Beans (NL&B) ; Clabber Girl baking pow- 
der (Pollyea, Terra Haute) ; Heckman Biscuits (Hartman) ; Swift's Allsweet (Burnett) ; Kraft 
Margarine (NL&B) ; Kraft's Mayonnaise (JWT) ; Parker Pen (Compton) ; HA Hair Arranger 
(R. Jack Scott). About set to buy: Speigel (R. Jack Scott). 

For the second time within a year D-F-S is on the quest for special rates from 
radio stations for L&M — but with this difference: the agency is side-stepping the 
reps and approaching the stations directly. 

One of the stations contacted by D-F-S reported to its rep that the deal the agency offered 
was lower than the lowest possible end rate and called for discounts not contained in the 
rate card. 

D-F-S's response to SPONSOR-SCOPE re this report: no comment. 

New food brands are doing a lot to keep spot buying active out of Chicago. 

• Quaker's ready -to-eat high-protein, Life (JWT), which has been under test in Albany, 
N. Y., for three years, is going national with tv schedules. The cereal is a competitor of 
Kellogg's K and emphasizes a built-in sweetener, which K lacks. 

• Two new 900-calorie formulas, Pet Milk's Sego (Gardner, St. Louis) and General 
Mills' Subtract (Knox-Reeves) are also bowing into air media this month, with Sego elect- 
ing spot tv and Subtract, spot radio. 



With the way the scheduling"* going in network tv, sports could turn out to be 
the last refuge of live programing. 

Perhaps that's why sports continues to be 

In any event, there'll be more network 
lar during the 1961-62 season, with Ford, as 
long-range policy recruits. 

Following is SPONSOR-SCOPE's network 
nue (time, talent, rights, production and cable 



a highly saleable commodity in the medium. 
sports than ever on tap for the sponsor dol- 
noted in the previous issue, among the latest 

by-network breakdown of estimated sports reve- 
costs included) for the coming season: 



ABC TV 




CBS TV (Conti 


nued) 


EVENT PACKAGE PRICE 


PGA Tournament 


$250,000 


Sat. Night Fights 


$7,000,000 


Miscellaneous 


3,000,000 


Sat. Sports Specials 


3,200,000 


TOTAL CBS TV 


$26,275,000 


American League Football 


6,000,000 


NBC TV 




NCAA Football 


6,100,000 


Baseball Game of Wk. 


$7,600,000 


Post-fight programs 


1,300,000 


Pro Basketball 


7,000,000 


All-Star Football 


375,000 


World Series 


3,800,000 


Bing Crosby Golf 


250,000 


All-Star Games (2) 


1,200,000 


Miscellaneous 


2,000,000 


Rose Bowl 


700,000 


TOTAL ABC TV 


$26,225,000 


Sugar Bowl 


700,000 


CBS TV 




National Tennis 


350,000 


National League Football 


$10,800,000 


Liberty Bowl 


300,000 


NFL Championship Game 


850,000 


Blue-Gray Game 


250,000 


Baseball Game of Wk. 


6,000,000 


National Open Golf 


250,000 


Sun. Sports Specs 


3,500,000 


NIT Games (2) 


250,000 


Masters Tournament 


275,000 


Senior Bowl 


225,000 


Triple Racing Crown 


350,000 


East-West Game 


200,000 


Orange Bowl 


400,000 


Pre-game shows 


200,000 


Cotton Bowl 


350,000 


Miscellaneous 


1,500,000 


Blue Bonnet Bowl 


250,000 


TOTAL NBC TV 


$24,525,000 


Gator Bowl 


250,000 


GRAND TOTAL 


$77,025,000 






SPONSOR 


• 3 APRIL 1961 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



It would be no exaggeration to say that major tv agencies and their clients are 
appalled at the prices asked for some of the new network half -hour film series. 

The negative costs of some of the new ones are running $60-65,000, as compared to 
two or three seasons back when $40-45,000 was considered pretty high. 

Undoubtedly the record-breaker of them all is the new Robert Young show, which has 
been sold on an alternate-week basis to Scott Paper and Toni at $72,000 for originals 
and $30,000 for reruns. 

Scott, whose relations with Young and his producer, Gene Rodney, have been most cordial 
over the years, couldn't resist a protest when the price was mentioned. 

However, it became reconciled by the thought that if the budget proved too overwhelm- 
ing, the series would be given a summer hiatus and a cheaper show substituted. 

Reynolds Metals (L&N) may be starting something that could, if widely adopt- 
ed, throw a monkey wrench into the alternate-week cross-plugging concept. 

In settling on an alternate hour of NBC TV's Dick Powell anthology Reynolds stipulated 
that it would consume all six minutes of commercial time coming to it. 

This means the other sponsor or sponsors of the series will have to forego mention on 
the alternate week. 





CBS TV is definitely getting off the ground with its 10 a.m.-to-noon rotating 
minute sales plan. 

As of last week it was running around 50% of sellout; that is, of the 100 spots avail- 
able approximately 50 were sponsored. NBC TV morning periods were 75% sold. 

Nighttime sponsored picture for the first week of March: in terms of minutes ABC TV 
was up 25% over a year ago, CBS TV was down 10% and NBC TV was up 10%. 

NBC TV is making it easier for advertisers to buy into most of its fall hour 
shows by pricing them at a flat $30,000 gross per commercial minute. 

The effect: (1) it betters the network's competitive position, particularly on new se- 
ries; (2) it provides a convenient type of buy for individual brands. 

In some cases the network requires a run of 26 consecutive weeks; in others, the 
minimum is 13 weeks, with alternate weeks verboten. 

P&G will have a record number of weekly nighttime commercial minutes rid- 
ing this fall on the tv networks. 

At the moment the P&G product exposure adds up to 18^4 minutes a week, 
with the placement as follows: the Snowwhites, three minutes; Cheyenne, two minutes; 
Rifleman, three minutes; the Dick Van Dyke show, three minutes; the Real McCoys, three 
minutes; the CBS TV period now occupied by the Tom Ewell show, 1% minutes; the un- 
scheduled ABC TV Thursday 9:30-10 period, three minutes. 



ABC TV points to the January-February 1960 report on audience composition 
by ARB as giving added support to the network's claim that its nighttime schedule 
holds top favor with the younger and larger tv homes. 

The following comparisons concern average per-minute ratings between 7:30-11 p.m.: 







GROUPS 


ABC TV 






Under 40 


24.7 






40-54 


20.5 






55 & over 


15.8 






1-2 families 


15.4 






3-4 families 


19.6 






5 & over families 


27.1 


SPONSOR • 


3 APRIL 1961 







CBS TV 

20.9 
22.0 
22.8 
21.6 
22.7 
21.5 



NBC TV 
18.3 

17.7 
21.1 
19.3 
18.7 
19.0 



25 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Put this one down as a first since the advent of bigtime tv. CBS TV is turning 
over a nighttime period to a regularly scheduled sports show, namely, what is now 
the Sunday Sports Spectacular. 

The switch will be for the spring and summer. The spot: Thursday 7:30-8:30. 
The suggestion for the move came from JWT in behalf of Schlitz. 

Look for Campbell Soup (BBDO) to up its spot radio budget for 1961*62. 

The pattern will be to cover all the bigger markets in its regional buys, which will raise 
the list to between 80-100 markets. 

A report prepared for the annual meeting of CBS, Inc., stockholders (19 April) 
reveals that the top five earners on the broadcast side in 1960 earned among them 
around $1,164,627 in salaries, additional compensation and retirement pensions. 

Additional Compensation 



PERSON 


SALARY 


PAID OUT 


DEFERRED 


PENSION 


TOTAL 


William S. Paley 


$150,000 


$138,750 


$11,250 


$59,252 


$359,252 


Frank Stanton 


150,000 


138,750 


11,250 


59,027 


359,027 


Merle S. Jones 


100,096 


17,500 


22,500 


24,300 


164,3% 


James T. Aubrey, Jr. 


100,000 


40,000 




30,300 


170,300 


Arthur Hull Hayes 


63,500 


16,250 


8,750 


23,152 


111,652 


TOTAL 


$563,596 


$351,250 


$53,750 


$196,031 $1,164,627 



What is now a lot of smoke on the beer front could turn out to be a big spot 
billings fire come the warm weather up north. 

Practically all the brand leaders with more or less national distribution hav 

been inquiring about availabilities of time and programs in both tv and radio. 

These include Schlitz (JWT), Miller (Mathisson), Old Milwaukee (Best), Pabst an 
Blatz (K&E). Budweiser (D'Arcy) is deep in the process of actually buying tv and r, 
dio. An active regional is Frankenmuth, buying radio through Marcus, Cleveland. 

Incidentally, more and more reps are acting as local salesmen for stations in 
getting orders from national brewers via their agencies. The rate is local card rate, with 
the agencies expected to add on their 17.6% commission. 



■ 






The SRA's standard contract form has but one hurdle to go for final adoption 
at JWT. 

The agency's media department has been studying the form since last November and last 
week it recommended to the legal department the latter give it its imprimatur. 

Quite a number of other important spot agencies have already embraced the 
form, but an exception will be Burnett. It's not because Burnett doesn't favor it, but the 
agency handles station buying via an automation system. 

Looks like Compton will plug the hole made by the exit of Mobiloil with the 
acquisition from Grey of Chock Full o' Nuts ($2.5 million). 

Grey is making up partially for this defection with the Martinson coffee account. 

Farm radio markets, which include large urban stations catering to rural audi- 
ences, are due for a huge haul of Ford tractor dollars out of Meldrum & Fewsmith, 
Cleveland. 

The market list may run as high as 600, and the occasion is the introduction of a 
new large-type tractor, which makes Ford now competitive with International-Harve9tei 

For other news coverage In this Issue: see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Sponsor-Week, page 29; Sponsor Week Wrap-Up, page 66; Washington Week, page 71: 
sponsor Hears, page 74; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 80; and Film-Scope, page 72. 

26 sponsor • 3 APRIL 1% 



** 




Iil< 



AROMNA 



/^\T T"l~> ^1 . We don't exactly own South Carolina, but we claim it as our beat. Our oyster, 
V_x \^J XuO • in a real sense. It opens up for us because we know its business, government, 
culture, people. People best of all: their likes, dislikes, habits, greatnesses, and strengths. A knowledge 
growing out of nearly 30 years of operating broadcasting faculties in the capital city. □ This is why 
we're credited with a 78.7% share of viewing (by Nielsen) in the Columbia Metropolitan Area. 
Over a quarter million people in the 1960 Census, largest in the state and second only to Charlotte 
in both Carolinas. And our 1526-foot tower makes more of all South Carolina ours than any other 
station can claim. □ This is another good reason why South Carolina's major selling force is 



WI S television 



NBC/ABC — Columbia, South Carolina 



Charles A. Batson, Managing Director 



IK'S 



A station of THE BROADCASTING COMPANY OF THE SOUTH 

G. Richard Shafto, Executive Vice President 

WIS-television, Channel 10, Columbia, S.C. • WIS Radio, 560, Columbia, S.C. • WSFA-TV, Channel 12, Montgomery, Ala. / All represented by Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



By Any Yardstick 



IKE BIG ON 



Takes the Measure 



WKRGTV 



CHANNEL 5 MOBILE, ALA. 

Call Avery-Knodel, Representative 
or C. P. Persons, Jr., Qeneral Manager 




28 



SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 1961 



3 April 1961 



Latest tv and 
radio developments of 
the week, briefed 
for busy readers 



SPONSOR-WEEK 



FCC studies conversion of commercial v's to education 
Admen pass the new ASA ratings summary buck to analysts 
Nielsen's Media Service: 'complementary' or 'competitive'? 



NET TV BUYING FLURRY AS OPTIONS END 



Client options are up today (Monday) after a weekend 
extension by the networks because of the holiday. 
Shortening deadline spurred a flurry of buying activity 
in the past fortnight. 

In the six-day sales period from 20 to 28 March, 20 
major agencies made 40 program buys on the three 
networks. A SPONSOR-WEEK summary of sales re- 
ported by the networks for this time period points up 
these trends: 

• Most of the sales are new rather than renewal busi- 
ness— 29 in 40 transactions. 

• More than three-fourths of the sales are for fall 
rather than summer sponsorship. 

• Five agencies in the 20 represented account for 25 
of the 40 program buys. 

• A total of 31 advertisers was signed by the three 
networks in six sales days, with 13 for CBS TV, 11 for 
NBC TV and 7 for ABC TV (verbal orders not included). 

Agencies doing the most business in terms of total 
program buys — NOT necessarily in terms of billing vol- 
ume and commercial tonnage — were headed by Comp- 
ton, with portions of seven programs purchased for 
Schick safety razor. 

Next in order of total number of show buys were Len- 
nen & Newell and Kenyon & Eckhardt, with five each. 
The weight is with L&N, however, because through it 
the American Gas Assn. has contracted for eight hour- 
long live dramas based on movie scripts owned by the 
Selznick Co. 

Series will be telecast in color at the rate of one 
monthly on NBC TV. Other L&N clients which bought 
(Continued on page 31) 



$40 million billing in latest ad merger 

$40 million is the estimated annual billing for 
the newly merged Western Advertising and Geyer, 
Morey. Madden & Ballard, the former contributing 
some $6 million of this total. 

Western, a 36-year-old agency, becomes a divi- 
sion of GMM&B, which is 50 years old. Announce- 
ment was made by Sam M. Ballard, president of 
GMM&B, and G. B. Gunlogson, Western board 
chairman. Move is effective today (Monday). 



FCC to study how commercial vhf s in 
L.A., N.Y. could convert to education 

(Washington): Two commercial vhf tv stations in New 
York and Los Angeles may be diverted to educational 
uses. 

Possibility came to light last week as FCC in a sur- 
prise move approved immediate inquiry into feasibile 
methods by which this could be done. Each city now 
has seven commercial vhf allocations. 

FCC notes that 13% of the American public living in 
these markets is now deprived of such a service, 'and 
that both cities have unusually good educational re- 
sources. Both have unused uhf allocations for educa- 
tional facilities. 

Deadline for comments is 1 May. FCC contends it is 
"urgently desirable and in the public interest to inquire 
into means." Study will be complex and necessarily 
threatens existing commercial operations. 

Dissenter was Com. Robert E. Lee. 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



29 



Fabulous 



...even for TEXAS! 









*-?: 



• • « • 




^rrrrf!|i^it?rjrrfnfl!!l 



■ 4 



m .in iiimI 






THE NEW 3 1/2 MILLION DOLLAR HOME OF 



FAA 



am • fm • tv 
DALLAS 



// 



The move is completed. . . now the combined staffs of WFAA RADIO & 
TV are located in the largest and most modern independent facility of its 
kind in the world. Everything is new! It is truly a "Communications Center"! 



AM - FM 

\\ FAA K ADM) i an now boasl production 
and transmitting Facilities second to 
none. There i> four channel stereo, a 
floating sound stage, a battery of all new 
Ampex tape consoles, Neumann single 
track and stereo disc recording equip- 
ment, a special sound effects room and 
much, much more. 



TV 

Three large studios full\ equipped w ith 9 
Marconi lVL>" Image Orthicon cameras, 
color cameras, a revolutionary Tele-Cine' 
center, 5 Ampex videotape recorders, the 
latest intersynch and interswitch equip- 
ment, and a $250,000 videotape cruiser 
that can go anywhere. 



&&«,yi/ame J^.. WFAA-AM-FM-TV CAN PRODUCE IT! 

WFAA 



Edw.rdlP.lry »|Co ,lnc I 



30 



RADIO — 570 ABC • 820 NBC 
TELEVISION — CHANNEL 8 ABC 

Radio <£ Television Services Of The Dallas Morning News 

SPONSOR • 3 APRIL l'Xil 



3 April 1961/SP0NS0R-WEEK 



(Continued from page 29) 

net tv: R. J. Reynolds, Reynolds Metals, Lorillard's Kent 
cigarettes. 

The K&E accounts: Mead-Johnson, buying into four 
NBC TV shows, and Pabst Brewing (CBS TV). Next in 
agency rank were Young & Rubicam and Dancer-Fitz- 
gerald-Sample, each with four program buys. 

Y&R: One-half of "New Breed" on ABC TV for Johnson 
& Johnson, a third of "Bus Stop" on ABC TV for Singer 
Sewing, renewal on ABC TV for J&J of "Donna Reed" 
and "Surfside 6." 

The DFS business: Sterling Drug for NBC TV's "Thrill- 
er" and "Dr. Kildare," L&M also in the latter and for 
"Twilight Zone" on CBS TV. 

Only non-New York agencies represented in the buy- 
ing list for that period were North Adv. and Leo Bur- 
nett, Chicago, and Knox-Reeves, Minneapolis. 

Most of this new business — about 40% of the program 
buys— has come from drugs and cigarettes, with other 
product categories about evenly divided with only two 
or three program buys. 



Storer names Baxter to radio v.p. slot 

Encouraging nod in radio's direction has been given 
by the Storer Broadcasting Co., where Lionel Baxter has 
been named vice president for radio and the seven 
Storer radio properties. 

Baxter's credo is to match 
community need with the basic 
program service of news, mu- 
sic, entertainment and special 
features. Four of the Storer out- 
lets are independents, three, 
network-affiliated. 
Baxter has held a variety of 

executive positions with the 
Lionel Baxter f irm since 1953i wnen he be _ 

came commercial manager of WBRC, Birmingham, and 
moved a year later to the managing directorship. In 
'57 he took over v.p. and management of the Phila- 
delphia outlet, WIBG, remaining there until 1959. 




TvAR to represent 3 CBS stations 

Television Advertising Representatives will represent 
three major tv stations now serviced by CBS Spot Sales. 

They are: WTOP-TV, Washington; WBTV, Charlotte, 
and WJXT, Jacksonville. Effective date is 25 June. 
TvAR now reps five tv stations owned by Westinghouse 
Broadcasting, of which it is a subsidiary. 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



RESEARCHERS' EYES CLUED TO FINE 
PRINT IN U.S. RATINGS SUMMARY 

Statisticians and analysts throughout the industry are 
absorbed this week in a word-by-word perusal of the 
complex 163-page report on ratings made by the Ameri- 
can Statistical Assn. to the Committee on Interstate 
and Foreign Commerce in Washington. 

Admen and most broadcast pros are throwing up their 
hands— figuratively and literally— and relying on re- 
search colleagues to untangle the skeins of technical 
terms and interpretations. 

In balance, the report seems to omit specific con- 
clusions arid to straddle the fence in documenting an 
equal number of pros and cons about current ratings 
services, their systems and techniques. 

Several trends emerging seem to follow those already 
established in agency analysis of the raw ratings data. 
Among them: 

• The major agencies blend the results of more than 
one service to come up with a pattern. They don't take 
a raw rating at numerical value per se. 

For example, if Service A shows a 10 rating, Service 
B a 5, these raw figures are balanced off against the pro- 
gram competition. Usually rankings of shows in rela- 
tion to others surveyed by the same service show a 
constant pattern. 

• The same generalized approach is usually taken 
for audience composition data. For example, a pro- 
gram may attract 60 women, 30 men and 10 teens for 
among every 100 persons. 

An agency analyst, looking for trends, would be in- 
fluenced against buying such a program for a male au- 
dience because of the female dominance. 

New York admen, commenting on the survey in gen- 
eral terms, concur that there is a need for standardiza- 
tion and additional documentation, and for the ATA's 
recommended Office of Research Methodology. 

As one noted, however, "Everybody is for better rat- 
ings. It's like no one being against sin!" 

Oren Harris, chairman of the Regulatory Agencies 
subcommittee — a follow-up group to the former Over- 
sight subcommittee which commissioned the independ- 
ent study a year ago — commented on the report's com- 
plexity as he released it to the press 10 days ago. 

He noted there was something in it for everybody — 
for those people against and those pro ratings as now 
determined. 

The six chapters in the booklet cover these subjects: 

1. General introduction. 2. Discussion, conclusions 
and recommendations. 3. The data provided by the rat- 
ing services. 4. Methods used and populations covered 
in current rating services. 5. Interviewing procedures. 
6. Sampling methods. 



31 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA 

C AND WESTERN NEVADA } 




Sutter's Fort, today an historical monument, is visited annually by more than 300,000 persons 



Sacramento always has been a leader in California history 
and development. Even in the pioneer days of Sutter's 
Fort it was the center of an area obviously destined for a 
great future. Sacramento, today, has fulfilled that early 
promise and is one of California's most prosperous mar- 
kets. KFBK, the Beeline station in Sacramento, reaches 
the listeners who do the biggest share of the buying in 
this market. 

Sacramento is one of the five important markets in 
Inland California and Western Nevada where Beeline 
stations reach more radio homes than any other combina- 
tion of stations — at the lowest cost per thousand. (Niel- 
sen, SR&D) 

Better check the Beeline stations for your next cam- 
paign in this vital area. 



McClatchy 

Broadcasting 

Company 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
PAUL H. RAYMER CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




KOH o . 

KFBK O SaCHamENIO 
KBEE ° MODESTO 



KMJ o mfSNo 



KERN ° BAKEKSHEID 




32 



SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 1961 



3 April 1961 SPONSOR-WEEr 



Wall St. Journal says tv $$ gains spark 
revamp of Satevepost, maybe Life 

A whopping 36-inch story in last Wednesday's "Wall 
St. Journal" credited tv's capture of advertising dollars 
as the big reason for an upcoming revamp of the "Sat- 
urday Evening Post"— and possibly "Life," too. 

Among statements in Michael Creedman's summary: 

• "Changes (in prospect for Satevepost) are dictated 
by an entirely new challenge: tv." 

• "The trouble, according to magazine men, is de- 
clining advertising, lost mostly to tv in recent years." 

• "The 'Post's' big competitors in the general maga- 
zine field— 'Life' and 'Look'— have not come up with the 
complete answer to tv competition either." (See adja- 
cent story.) 

WSJ noted that 1960 was the 10th consecutive year 
in which "Post" had ad lineage losses. In 1950 lineage 
totals figured 3-plus million; a decade later, despite cir- 
culation gains lineage dropped to 1.8-plus million. 



N. Y. ratings bill voted into limbo 

The New York State bill which would have demanded 
full documentation about ratings used in promotion or 
sales was tabled indefinitely, in effect, as it was sent 
back to committee last week before adjournment of the 
Assembly. Move puts it in limbo until next year. 

Bill was filed by Assemblyman Bruce Manley, Repub- 
lican from Fredonia, on 4 January as an amendment to 
the penal law "in relation to the issuance of radio or 
tv ratings for the purpose of influencing the sale of 
advertising." 

Essence: to require full statements as to the "manner 
in which percentages or numbers are obtained" in- 
cluding "description of the method used, number of 
persons contacted, dates and times when contacted, 
location of such persons, exact area covered by the 
poll." 



Spring plus love equals Prince spaghetti 

Prince Macaroni Mfg. Co. has hired a "love entrepre- 
neur" to extoll this emotion's satisfactions to the na- 
tion's housewives. 

Three-minute radio features themed to "Nothing 
moves people like the power of love" indicate the spon- 
sor's implicit hope that nothing moves sales of spa- 
ghetti like spot radio (supplemented with newspapers). 

"A little romance" is to be imparted by John Fostini, 
"whose dramatic, virile voice and realistic approach to 
the subject of love are unique." 

Agency: Adrian Bauer and Alan Tripp, Philadelphia. 



ADMEN MULL COMPLEMENTARY' 
ROLE OF MAGAZINES TO TV 

A spot check on Agency Row reaction to A. C. Niel- 
sen's introduction of its new Nielsen Media Service is 
that magazines got a big boost. But admen talking with 
SPONSOR-WEEK aren't at all sure just what tv gets out 
of the new comparison. 

Objective of the new print-tv service, Nielsen spokes- 
men said Monday at a mass introduction or agencies 
and advertisers, is to "provide a continuing audience 
measurement of national magazines, of network tv and 
also to provide the facility for combining audiences that 
view or read these media." 

Presentation stressed that the information was not 
"competitive"-merely "complementary." But general 
findings are construed by many tv pros to be highly com- 
petitive, in THEIR sense of that word. 

One conclusion: magazines have "heaviest contact" 
m light-viewing tv homes, "minimum contact" in homes 
that have been covered heavily by tv." Thus the heavi- 
est readers aren't the heaviest viewers. 

Another summary: Westerns, situation comedies and 
mystery dramas reach more of the younger homes and 
Westerns have more general appeal than the other pro- 
gram types. Weekly magazine averages tend to have the 
same audience pattern as the average situation comedy 
or mystery drama. However, "the average Western 
reaches more of the lower income homes, those with a 
family income under $5,000," contrasted with the aver- 
age measured magazines which "has higher audiences 
in the upper income groups ($8,000-plus)." 

The average situation comedy and mystery drama- 
again— tend to have audiences similar to the maga- 
zines-upper income homes. Nielsen stressed that "no- 
body buys on averages; they help to give direction." 

ADVERTISING HAS ITS OWN M.M 

The initials MM took on new meaning last week as 
Metropolitan Broadcasting Corp. stockholders voted to 
change the corporate name to MetroMedia Inc 

John W. Kluge, board chairman and president, pointed 
out the multiple-media opera- 
tion of the company with its 
tv and radio properties and its 
recent acquisition of the Fos- 
ter & Kleiser outdoor advertis- 
ing firm which headquarters on 
the West coast. He noted also 
that the broadcast properties 
contribute about 50% to the 
company's gross. John W. Kluge 

Still further expansion was provided for by stock- 
holders who voted authorization to increase the num- 
ber of stock shares to 3.6 million. 




sponsor 



3 APRIL 1961 



More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 64 




Ten million viewers a week! Watching 33jnillion hours a week! 
That's the audience picture on the late show in just five markets 
. . . those served by the five CBS Owned stations. And the picture 
gets better all the time. Because the late show is now showing 
more great movie hits of the 'SO's . . . star-studded features, never 






1 




before shown on television, from a prize package of more than 
250 Columbia pictures (including 'The Caine Mutiny," "Knock 
On Any Door," "The Long Gray Line," "The Marrying Kind"). 
All this added to film libraries which already attract the largest 
movie audiences in each market . CBS TELEVISION STATIONS ® 

A Division of Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc. 
Operating WCBS-TV New York, WBBM-TV Chicago, KNXT Los Angeles, 
WCA U-TV Philadelphia, KMOX-TV St. Louis (all represented by 

CBS Television Spot Sales I 



why 
paint 
j ust the 

town? 



the Charlotte TV MARKET is First in the Southeast 

The way some people talk about covering city 
populations, you'd think the folks in the counties don't 
count. 

The Charlotte City population is a fair two-hundred 
thousand but the Charlotte TV Market population is a 
walloping first-place 642,500 homes! 

We'll add modestly that the WBTV bucket covers 
55.3'; more TV Homes than Charlotte Station "B." ** 



*sr 




He* 




UJBTV 



• Television Magazine— 1961 

•• ARB 1960 Coverage Study- 
Average Daily Total Homes Delivered 



CHANNEL 3 ^ CHARLOTTE/ 



JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 






# SPONSOR 

3 APRIL 19 6 1 




"We use spot radio 
to solve marketing prob- 
lems. If we use it . . . 



BBDO boosts spot radio with 
new 'pocket piece' 

** Top user of medium is sending primer 
to its clients in attempt to break down long- 
held theories, show medium's present values 



■SBDO, the top spot radio billing agency ($15 million in 1960, ac- 
cording to sponsor's estimate), is sending out to its clients this week 
^ts long-awaited booklet on spot radio. The booklet takes a hard and 
authoritative look at the economics of spot radio, its audience and 
delivery. It is in effect a briefing to the agency's clients as well as 
notice that, while many of the old opinions about radio have died 
hard, they are unequivocally dead. 

The pocket piece, released by BBDO's v. p. and media director 
Herbert D. Maneloveg, contains an abundance of charts, figures and 
facts (some surveys were especially made for BBDO) on the "hows" 
ind "whys" of spot radio buying, but this does not mean that the 
igency is establishing a set pattern for spot radio use among its clients. 

"Every product, every client is different," said Maneloveg, "and 

here are dozens of ways to use spot radio. The purpose of the booklet 

s to remind clients and some of our people that radio has changed — 

md what constitutes that change; to put it in a proper perspective and 

perhaps change some old ideas." 

Highlights of the report, prepared by the agency's media plan- 




. . . more than anybody 
else, then we're on 
top of the list. But . . . 



. . . we're not concerned 
about where we place," 
says Herb Maneloveg 




"Every product, every client is different; 
there are dozens of ways to use spot radio." 



mini iiii,iiii 

THE CHANGING STATION 

Independent vs. power & web stns. 

Top Top 

"Powerhouse" or Independent 

Network Station Music & News Station 

National Rating 
Index 100 100 

By County Size: 

A 97 140 

B 92 90 

C 59 55 

D 166 71 

By Homes With: 

Any Children 90 140 

No Children 109 62 

By Age of Head of House: 

16-39 63 131 

40-54 109 129 

55+ 113 55 

By Income Level: 

Lower (Under $5,000) 107 81 

Middle ($5,000-$8,000) 92 108 

Upper (Over $8,000) 103 123 

Source: Nielsen Mil study, prepared for BBDO, April I960 

BBDO is careful to point out that this study — published here for 
the first time — is not intended to in any nay deprecate the power- 
house stations, but to show clients the need for buying balance. 

Illllllllllllll 



ning and analysis department, in- 
clude analyses of: 

e The growth of the independent 
stations, including basic audience 
profiles of these compared with 
"powerhouse" and network stations. 
A special Nielsen study prepared for 
the agenc) in LOO markets illustrates 
this section. 

• The cost efficiency of spot radio 
comparing "typical" cost-per- 1.000 to 
network radio, network and spot tele- 
vision I e.g., "A tv advertiser will 
spend $105,000 per week for a night- 
time network show. This same ex- 
penditure will buy over 50 radio spots 



38 



per week in the top 100 markets.") 

• The reach of single vs. multiple- 
station buys, including a table show- 
ing bow hypothetical spot schedules' 
would build up four week undupli- 
cated ratings if split up on one. two 
or three stations ( from studies also 
especially prepared by Nielsen I. 

"The numbers — everything in this 
pocket piece — all these things are 
merelv a guide toward bu\ ing." Mane- 
loveg explained. "The) are merely 
documentation. There are obviously 
intuitive angles to understand before 
you bu) a medium: the numbers are 
a guide, but only our judgement and 



knowledge can lead us to decision.1 

BBDO uses the spot radio medium 
"to solve specific problems, to answer 
specific needs." Anion*! it- major 
Uses b\ 385 Madison Ave. timebiners 
are the following examples: 

I i To supplement a summer droi 
in television \ iewership. ("We often 
hold off a part of the budget for this 
purpose." I 

2) By examination of the profile dl 
a radio audience, when the buyer! 
seeks young households, for example, 
he u-e- spot radio for additional fre- 
quency against prime prospects on 
top of a layer of national media. 

5" I Sometimes because of budgq 
considerations or the peculiar profile 
of a product, they can use radio ex-' 
clusivel) {e.g. mens products in driv- 
ing time). 

4) Fm and "better-programing 
am stations give extra frequency for 
expensive purchase products. 

"We use spot radio to solve mar- 
keting problems; it's as simple as 
that," Maneloveg stated. "If we use 
it more than anybody else, then we're 
at the top of the list. But we're not 
concerned about where we place, only 
with how we use it." 

Among the special studies made for 
the pocket piece, one of the most sig- 
nificant to the medium deals with in- 
dependent vs. network stations. Il 
compares their audiences by county 
size, homes with children, age of 
head of household and income level. 
BBDO is careful to note that both' 
kinds of stations reach important seg- 
ments of the market, in which respect 
"they tend to complement each 
other." 

"Let me point out." said Manelo-i 
veg. "that this studv — published hen 
for the first time — does not. nor i- i! 
intended to. in any way deprecate lli. 
powerhouse stations. It is desi<me( 
to show our clients that a balance is 
necessary. Radio bin ing patterns an 
such that you must blend differ* 
stations together: you must examim 
station profiles." 

The special Nielsen stud\ i of H'< 
markets) illustrates the difference B 
basic profile between "powerhouse 
and network stations on the one ham 
and independent stations on the othei 
The former are shown to be mjE 
popular among older and sinalle 
families, to have a fiat profile In ii 



SPONSOS 



3 APRIL 1% 



come and a good reach into rural 
areas. 

The independent and music-and- 
news operations are shown to appeal 
to younger homes with children, to 
have "a sharp bias toward" higher- 
income families. And since most 
have "relatively weak signals" outside 
of their home areas, much of their 
audience tends to be concentrated in 
"A" and "B" counties. 

"The purpose is not to come up 
with something new or earth-shak- 
ing," Maneloveg said, "but to remind 
our clients of the changes in radio. 
The major use of this study is, after 
all, for justification of certain buys. 
Clients, so many of them, still remem- 
ber back to the days when power- 
house and network stations were the 
only ones they bought. But today, 



RADIO'S EFFICIENCY 

Its cost-per-1,000 is relatively low 



Typical 
CPM Homes 



Spot Radio 

Minute $1.00-1.50 

Network TV 

Day Minute $1.50-1.90 

Night Minute $3.30-3.75 

Spot TV 

Night "20" $2.20-2.75 

Fringe Minute $2.30-3.00 

Day Minute $1.50-2.00 

Network Radio 

Minute $ .75-1.50 

llll!lllll!!!llllllll[|||||l!!!lllll!ll>!ill!ll!lllllllllllillll!llll!llll!lll!!!!lllil!|!|||lillll!!!l 



Source: Nielsen. XHl Study, Prepared for BBDO, April 1960 



llllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllll 

RADIO'S REACH 

Typical buys, hypothetical schedules 

Undu plicated four-week audience in 21 major markets 

No. of Spots 4-Week Undup. 

per Week Rating Freq. 



Single-Station 


Buy— 








Top Station 




60 


38.3 


10.5 


2nd Station 




60 


34.5 


11.6 


3rd Station 




60 


33.5 


11.8 


4th Station 




60 


28.1 


9.1 



Multiple-Station Buys- 
Top 2 Stations 120. 

Top 3 Stations 180. 

Top 4 Stations 240.. 



.59.1. 
.68.7. 
.73.8. 



.13.6 
.17.5 
.19.7 



Four-week unduplicated metro-area rating (av. = 2.0) 

If Schedule is on: 



No. of 








Anns. 


One 


Two 


Three 


per week 


Station 


Stations 


Stations 


12 


17% 


22% 


25% 


21 


24 


38 


42 


27 


27 


43 


47 


39 


31 


51 


55 


45 


33 


54 


59 


75 


36 


58 


68 


90 


37 


60 


72 



Source: BBDO estimates based on special NRI tabulations. Apiil 1960 



illlllllllllllllll!lllilllllilll!l!lll!lllllll!!l!!!i!llll!!!!ill!l!lliii[l!lllll!!lllli!i!n 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



when you have a product that wants, 
say, big city or housewife orientation, 
the powerhouse station may not be 
the whole answer any more. 

"You may want a certain age 
group," he continued, "or you may 
want reach just within the city limits. 
You look at this profile on page 11 
and see that you can do better buying 
a number of independents in the same 
market. That's its purpose." 

The media director outlined 
BBDO's basic philosophy on the use 
of "the numbers" after noting that 
the agency would "put out a series of 
pocket pieces, one for every medium 
that most people have a deep interest 
in but about which they may have 
questions." Subsequent booklets will 
cover fringe television ( "What are 
the ratings; what an advertiser can 
acquire; who are the viewers?") ; 
daytime tv ( "This one is almost com- 
pleted.") ; Fm radio: supplements: 
total audience concepts of magazines 
and a twice-a-year rate digest. 

"We don't buy just for ratings," 
Maneloveg stressed. "The history of 
BBDO in tv shows that we have top 
programs some seasons and (font 
others. We examine the weekly fig- 
ures, of course, but we're not un- 
happy when they're not all tops; the 
"type' of audience we're reaching de- 
termines how happy we are. In radio, 
we use ratings the same way, just as 
a guide. We are more interested in 
the profile of our audience. 



39 



"Ratings are used only as a guide. In a buy, 
the important thing is the audience profile." 



"Ratings are numbers; numbers 
are people; people are markets. We 
are Irving to show our clients that 
profiles are the important thing. We'd 
just as happily sacrifice x number of 
rating points against better prospects 
among the audience. 

"In radio." he noted, "we're saying 
to our clients. 'Would you rather have 
a nice average seven on a Top-40 
station if you're selling a prestige 
product, or would you rather have a 
solid two or three on a station with 
compatible programing and an audi- 



ence with a high income?" 

Maneloveg said that he'd always 
been "surprised" at some agencies 
that make recommendations to clients 
and say that "our aim is to get x 
rating points a week." He asked, 
"What do rating points mean? You 
can buy a nice big plan, get good 
ratings — but perhaps you're not get- 
ting coverage, or you may be reach- 
ing the wrong people. 

"We must look beyond ratings," he 
declared. "For reach or coverage 
you may have to sacrifice cost-per- 



RADIO'S COST 

Minute buys by market groups 



Cost Per 
Week 



26-week 
Cost 



TOP 10 MARKETS 

12 spots per week $8,000.. 

24 spots per week 14,000. 

36 spots per week 19,000. 

48 spots per week 25,000. 



.$208,000 
...364,000 
...494,000 
...650,000 



TOP 50 MARKETS 

12 spots per week 20,000.. 

24 spots per week 36,000. 

36 spots per week 50,000. 

48 spots per week 66,000. 



....520,000 
....936,000 
1,300,000 
1,716,000 



TOP 100 MARKETS 

12 spots per week 28,000 728,000 

24 spots per week 49,000 1,274,000 

36 spots per week 69,000 1,794,000 

48 spots per week 91,000 2,366,000 

SRDS, TillDO estimates 

The agency notes here thai costs vary sharply by station and lime 
of day. Also, package plans featuring large discounts are not rep- 
resented in the above chart: costs should he used only as guide 



l.OOO. lose a couple of discounts and 
lni\ different outlets. This is what 
we're ti \ big to explain to our clients." 
I be study also makes note of radio 
programing trends. Based on station 
logs, Hooper and SRDS. BBDO esti- 
mates show a basic change since 
1954. Music and news formats have 
risen to "complete dominance." Al- 
most 75-85% of the programing ol 
most independent stations is now 
composed of music and Dews. 

Popular music accounted for 28' '< 
of programing in 1954, the survey 
says. Today it totals 48 r r . Concert 
music is up, from V '< in 1954 to 8% 
today. The other categories: Coun- 
trv music, still the same 7%; local 
news, up V , from 1954's 11%; net- 
work shows, clown to 10% today 
from 18' r ; and "miscellaneous," 
329? (1954), 15% today. 

The car radio audience tends. 
BBDO notes, to be (1) younger (be 
tween 18 and 44 years old) ; (2) ir 
hi»her income brackets, and (3) bet 
ter educated . . . "and thus offers 
prime target for advertising expc 
sure." Auto audience composition is 
listed as: from 6-9 a.m. — 77% mer 
ll'r women. 9' < teens and children 
and 1.8 listeners per car: from 9 a.m. 
to noon — 55'i men, 26 r v women, 
19 r '/ teens and children and 1.7 lis- 
teners per car; from noon to 6 p.m. 
— 52 r r men. 31% women. 17% 
teens and children, and 1.7 listeners 
per car; and from 6 p.m. to midnight 



-52' 



men. 



27 



' 



women. 



2r; 



teens and children and 1.9 listeners 
per car. 

BBDO concludes, from data de- 
veloped by Nielsen, Politz. Pulse and 
Sindlinger studies, that the average 
man does 30' < of his radio listening 
away from home. Only 13% of the 
average woman's listening is done* 
out-of-home. Of this, about TO' i ■ 
male listening is done in automo- 
biles; more than 50% of female lis- 
tening out-of-home is done in auto- 
mobiles. 

Auto listening. BBDO tells its cli- 
ents, adds 25-26' '< to in-home radio 
audiences. In the late afternoon and 
early evening hours, automobile- 
radio usage is 40^ as high as in- 
home listening. During an average 
day, almost 30 million people lister 
to car radios, males making up two 
thirds of the audience. 



40 



sl>o\soli 



3 APRIL 1961 



- 



Radio's lack of seasonality is a 
plus, BBDO indicates. Average radio 
listening per week "does not vary 
sharply by season." June, July and 
August listening levels are the same 
as the annual average for the medi- 
um, the study says, and although in- 
home listening tends to drop slightly 
in the summer, added out-of-home 
listening more than makes up for this 
loss. "TV viewing, on the other hand, 
declines by as much as 20% in the 
summer months." 

Multiple station buys, BBDO tells 
its clients, are essential to provide 
strong penetration, because "very 
few stations in major markets are 
able to reach 30' < or more of their 
metro area radio homes per week." 
In 21 major markets, the agency 
states, a "saturation" schedule of 60 
spots per week, on one station, will 
deliver 38% of the radio homes an 
average of 11 times each, over a 
four-week period. A two-station buy 
(120 spots per week) extends undu- 
plicated reach to 59%. A three-sta- 
tion buy (180 spots per week) 
reaches 69% of the homes, while all 
four stations combined deliver 74%. 

Summing up BBDO's purpose in 
issuing the pocket piece to its clients: 
"Spot radio offers advertisers the use 
of an extremely economical, high- 
frequency medium which can be pur- 
chased with maximum flexibility. In 
many cases, radio can be a front-line 
vehicle delivering high levels of mar- 
ket penetration. In other situations, 
spot radio can provide the added 're- 
minder' copy lift needed to supple- 
ment a national network or spot tv 
Schedule, or print campaign in key 
markets. 

"BBDO has long recognized the 
inherent qualitative as well as quan- 
titative values of spot radio. Because 
)f this, we have consistently explored 

ihe available data on radio in order 
o determine basic media buying and 
)lanning principles. In recommend- 
ing the medium for a specific mar- 
keting problem, no over-all rule of 
thumb or buying formulae can arbi- 
trarily be substituted for proper me- 
dia analysis which is geared to han- 
dle any specific questions." 

Maneloveg declared that the release 
>f the pocket does not mean that his 
Jgency is recommending spot radio 
>ver network radio, spot or network 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



RADIO'S PENETRATION 






Average station share, 182 markets 




By Market Size* 


Top 
Station 


2nd 
Station 


3rd 
Station 


All 
Others 


Under 50,000 


43.6 


26.0 

24.1 


....16.0 

....15.5 


14.4 
....25.6 


50,000-100,000 


34.8 


100,000-200,000 


32.4 


21.9 


....15.5 


....30.2 


200,000-400,000 


29.0 


16.4 


....12.9 


....41.7 


400,000 & Over 


23.5 


16.7 


....12.9 


....46.9 


All Markets 


28.3 


18.7 


....13.2 


...39.8 








•Homes in metro area. Source 


Hooper, 1958 19G0 7 


a.m. -noon. 






//( the larger markets 
to 25% because of 


, the top station 
the greater au 


'5 share does 
dience split, 


well to average 23 
the agency notes. 



INDIE VS. WEB OUTLETS 

Comparison in 50 major markets 



Avg. 
Rating 



Avg. 
Share 



Top Independent 4.2 30 

Network 

A 2.2 16 

B 1.5 10 

C 1.1 8 

D 1.0 7 



Source: Hooper. 1960 



The basic profile of the "powerhouse" (50,000 watt) is "adult 
oriented." Independent outlets tend to appeal to younger homes. 



tv — "or any other medium, for that 
matter. 

"We're just passing on all the 
available knowledge of the medium 
that we have, for our clients' educa- 
tion and appraisal. 

"In our covering note we point 
out that we hope the booklet will help 
them to more easily understand the 
medium. We also state that our me- 
dia department will be happy to ex- 



pand on the study and specifically 
document how spot radio may or may 
not be suited to their advertising and 
marketing problems. 

"We want them to understand the 
scope and potential of spot radio, as 
well as other media that might im- 
prove their marketing picture. Other 
pocket pieces concerning other media 
will, we hope, accomplish this 
aim. ^ 



41 



. 




STRICTLY BUSINESS — In the casual relaxed atmosphere of the poolside pctio at St. Petersburg's Colonial Inn, reps get i 
"Pick a Pair of 6-Palcs" promotion. Eugene F. Gray (I), the Boiling Co., Kansas City, goes over market lists with J. 



ndivldual briefings 
Dolan Walsh of 



HOW TO GET TOP AVAILS IN A 

^ Budweiser flew down its agency (D'Arcy), a few dozen Chicago, St. Loni)- 
under the waving Florida palms in effort to corral prime air availahilities for 



^Jonic hard-boiled business matters 
were thrashed out here beneath the 
languorous palms of balm) Florida, 
where Anheuser-Busch laid out the 
\el\et carpet for reps in an effort to 
nail down blue chip availabilities for 
its upcoming, king-size summer pro- 
motion in supermarkets. 



The makers of Budweiser and its 
St. Louis agency. D'Arcy, won't see 
all the returns in for a couple of 
months — the annual "Pick a Pair of 
(>Paks" promotion doesn't begin un- 
til the end of Ma\ — but if the client 
doesn't get the cream of announce- 
ment spots on radio and t\. it cer- 



tainly won't be for lack of living 
A few wicks ago, \nheuser-Buscl 
flew down a load of 75 media rep 
to its new $25 million plant, set ii' 
exotic Busch Gardens, consisting D 
15 acres of tropical Mora and faun, 
and one of the Florida s outstandinj 
tourist attractions. About three dos 



42 



.SPONSOR 



3 APKII. 1% 




on Budweiser market budgets for its upcoming 
D'Arcy. Meanwhile, other reps await turn 



NICE WAY 

reps to discuss business 
key summer promotion 



en key Chicago and St. Louis station 
reps were in the party. 

The media sellers were exposed to 
the best in casual Florida hospital- 
ity. But when the reps got down to 
cases (beside the pool) about market 
budgets with Harry K. Renfro, 
D'Arcy v.p. and manager of radio/tv 



media and J. Dolan Walsh, assistant 
radio/tv media manager, it was 
strictly business. There was good 
reason for it: 

• The $2.5 million I half for ra- 
dio/tv) summer push was described 
by Raymond E. Krings. Anheuser- 
Busch ad manager, as the most heav- 
ily supported promotion of its kind 
in the country. "This is no peanut 
deal," he told the reps. 

• From 25 May through 31 July, 
during which time all Budweiser con- 
sumer advertising will be geared to 
"'Pick a Pair," announcements will 
run on more than 600 radio stations 
and more than 300 tv stations. In 
addition, the promotion will be sup- 
ported by the Budweiser-owned The 
Third Man, a half-hour series now 
running in some 80 markets. 

• Though Budweiser is holding 
firmly to its number one ranking in 
beer sales and its share of market has 
increased nationally during the past 
four years, Budweiser's share of su- 
permarket sales is down. William E. 
Bien, Anheuser-Busch marketing v.p., 
explained to the reps that 40'/f of na- 
tional beer volume is concentrated 
in supermarkets. 

• Budweiser, as well as other 
brewers, is being hit where it hurts 
by the supermarkets' private label 
beers. For this and the above rea- 
sons, Budweiser is understandably 
determined to get as much mileage 
out of its new supermarket promo- 
tion as possible. 

The agency, client, and rep group 
from Chicago and St. Louis arrived 
in Tampa aboard a chartered DC-7. 
where they were greeted at Busch 
Gardens by August A. Busch, Jr., 
president and board chairman of 
Anheuser-Busch, who told them why 
this year's marketing plans are so 
important to the company. 

Nearly 8.5 million barrels of beer 
were sold in 1960, he said, a record 
year for the brewery. He credited 
the "Pick a Pair" promotion for the 
company's hike in profits from $13 
million in 1959 to $15.4 million in 
1960. Last year marked the fourth 
consecutive year that Anheuser- 
Busch has maintained its record as 
number one in national beer sales. 
(In 1957 it regained the title as num- 
ber one in national beer sales by 
brewery, and in 1958 became the 



leading branded seller. I 

The general business sessions and 
the individual media meetings dur- 
ing the following two days were con- 
ducted in a uniquely informal en- 
vironment on St. Petersburg Beach, 
at poolside and in meeting rooms of 
the Colonial Inn where the group 
was quartered during the trip. 

The four-day excursion probably 
represents an unprecedented rapport 
between advertiser-agency and me- 
dia. While no actual buying was 
done on the trip, budgets were dis- 
cussed, and marketing and merchan- 
dising objectives were outlined for 
the promotion. This major thrust 
will gain additional impetus this year 
by a 20'/f increase in the consumer 
advertising budget. 

Running concurrently in the "Pick 
a Pair" campaign will be full-page, 
four-color ads in eight national mag- 
azines and Sunday supplements, as 
well as a heavy outdoor schedule dur- 
ing June and July. 



ENJOYING the hospitality of Anheuser- 
Busch are (I) John F. Box, Jr., of the Balaban 
stations and rep firm head Robert E. Eastman 




PREVIEW of Budweiser promotion is gotten 
by Raymond E. Krings (I), Anheuser-Busch ad 
mgr.; John C. Macheca, D'Arcy v.p. and a.e. 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 







Here'- how the "Pick a Pair*' pro- 
motion work- for Budweiser at the 
retail level: The "buy-two' concept 
applies I" just about any item on the 
grocers" -helves. I'nder the "Pick a 
Pair" slogan, strongly identified 
with Budweiser, retailers are encour- 
aged to promote two of anything 
the\ desire. Budweiser. iti addition 
to its own in-store displays, pro\ ides 
the material for retailer use on other 
items: "Pick a Pair" over-the-w ire- 
hangers, price cards, shelf talkers, 
window posters, etc. These materials 
do not hear the name Budweiser — 
just the "Pick a Pair" slogan. The 
only place the Budweiser name is 




POSING for group picture are midwest reps, 
Anheuser-Busch executives, media people from 
D'Arcy following tour of new Budweiser plant 



featured is at the Budweiser stack 
displays, and other points of pur- 
chase. 

The annual ''Pick a Pair promo- 
tion has gained wide acceptance in 
the grocery and package store trade 
during the past four years. Morris 
R. Shlensky. president of the Katz 
Drug Chain reported: '"I he slogan 
'Pick a Pair' has been popularized to 
the point where it is now an accepted 
American axiom. The Katz chain 
has realized such fine results ft m the 
promotion that we have extended it 
on a storewide basis." 

G. C. Brannon. president of the 
Piggh Wiggl) Corp., had this to sav 
of the promotion: '"Pick a Pair 
points to increased sale- in all de- 
partments." 

The "Pick a Pair'" conce; t. devel- 
oped in December L957 by th i 
brewerx and D'Arcy. began on a 
modest sca!e in 1958. But soon after 
the first year promotion of the buy- 
two theory, "Pick a Pair"" seemed 
destined for succ< ss, according to An- 
(Please turn to page 56) 



FIVE-YEAR REPORT 
ON SPOT TV GROWTH 

+ A hefty increase is revealed in TvB-Rorabaugh 
study; '60 totals 50% ahead of amount invested in '56 

^ Announcements thrive as programs recede; number 
of spenders up; eight product categories double outlay 



I \B today (3 April) releases a 
five-year review of spot tv's substan- 
tial growth, detailing the components 
of a 50% increase in gross time ex- 
penditures over 1956. Among its 
revelations: 

• Spot tv more and more is be- 
coming an announcement operation, 
while programs' share of revenue is 
on the wane 

• The average spot tv advertiser 
spends nearly 80% more 

• The number spending over $1,- 
000,000 rose from 81 to 125 

• Eight product classifications 
have doubled their investment; seven 
showed a hike of 50% or more 

The report is a culmination of five 
years of research into and publica- 
tion of spot tv expenditures by TvB 
and N. C. Rorabaugh. TvB does 
similar work on network tv, with the 
help of LNA-BAR. The wealth of in- 
formation available for television is 
conspicuously absent from radio due 
to inability to develop a satisfactory 
and economical method, and lack of 
cooperation from stations, agencies 
and advertisers. 



Spot tv advertisers spent $616, 
701,000 last vear, compared t 
$397,606,000 in 1956, according t 
the study. While the number of ad 
vertisers was down slightly, individ- 
ual expenditures were way up and 
withdrawals came almost entirely 
from those who spent under $20,000 
a year. TvB finds. 

Looking at individual advertisers, 
the largest (Procter & Gamble i tre- 
bled its spot tv budget over the five- 
year period, pushing the figure from 
$17,522,450 to $55,084,440. 

The 10th highest spot tv adver- 
tiser's expenditure in the medium 
was 46' < higher in 1960 than five 
years earlier. Miles Laboratories 
held down that position in 1956 with 
$5,354,730. Last year it was the 
Wrigley Co. which spent $7,810,220. 

To qualify for 100th place last 
year took almost twice the spot tv in- 
vestment that made the grade in 
1956. American Bakeries Co. did it 
with $797,330 five years ago. In 
1960 Standard Oil of California oc- 
cupied the slot bv spending $1,332,- 
990. 



SPOT TELEVISION SPENDING 



1956: $397,606,000 

1960: $616,701,000 



•Gross time, TvB -Rorabaugh 



41 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



That spot tv more and more is an 
announcement medium can clearlv be 
seen in the direction taken by these 
increased monies. Announcements 
and participations were up 75%, 
I.D.'s 42%, while programs virtually 
remained the same in expenditures. 

The figure for announcements and 
participations went from $266,970,- 
000 in 1956 to $466,556,000 last 
year. I.D.'s hit $66,343,000 in 1960. 
compared to $46,906,000 fixe years 
ago. For programs, the investment 
remained in the neighborhood of 
$84,000,000. 

Therefore, announcements and 
participations increased their share 
of the total spot tv dollar from 67% 
to 76%. I.D.'s were down slightly, 
from 11.8% to 10.8%, and programs 
showed a drop in share from 21% to 
13.6%, according to TvB. 

As for number of advertisers in 
the medium, last year's total is down 
somewhat from 1956 (3,807, com- 
pared to 4,000 previously). 

TvB breaks down the five-year 
progress of spot tv expenditures by 
product category (see chart). It lists 
eight classifications that more than 
doubled their spending in the medi- 
um. In addition there are seven 
groups that went up 50% or more, 
six, between 25% and 50%, .and two 
that were up less than 25%. On the 
other hand, TvB found decreased 
spot tv spending by seven product 
categories. 

The study traces the five year prog- 
ress of 1960's top 10 brands among 
the spot tv investors. In the lead 
with $7,810,000 is Wrigley chew- 
ing gum, which spent under a mil- 
lion dollars in the medium five years 
ago. 

Second is Lestoil at $7,107,000. 
considerably less than its 1959 out- 
lay, but well above the 1956 expen- 
diture of $807,630. Next comes Max- 
well House coffee, in the top 10 all 
five years, but now at its all-time 
high. In fourth, Kellogg cereals, up 
a million dollars over its 1956 figure. 
Mr. Clean, not yet on the market in 
1956, or 1957. occupied fifth place 
last year. 

Rounding out the top ten brands: 
Alka Seltzer, up there all five years; 
Kent cigarettes, which spent $4,667.- 
000 in 1960 compared to $188,280 
in 1956; Ford automoHles: Yuban 



BILLING TRENDS VARY GREATLY 



These classifications more than doubled spot tv spending: 



Amusements and entertainment 

Garden supplies 

Hotels and resorts 

Household cleaners, polishes, etc. 



Household laundry products 
General household items 
Publications 
Sporting goods 



These classifications went up 50% or more in spot dollars: 



Automotive 



Clothing, furnishings, etc. 
Confections and soft drinks 
Cosmetics and toiletries 



Food and grocery products 
Gasoline and lubricants 



Pet products 



These classifications went up between 25% and 50%, 



Agriculture 



Ale, beer, wine 



Consumer services 



Drug products 



Stationery 



Transportation 



These classifications went up but less than 25 % 



Household paper products 



Tobacco 



These classifications went down in spot tv: 



Building material 



Dental products 



Household equipment 



Household furnishings 



Notions 



Tv, radio, phonograph 



Watches, jewelry, cameras 



coffee, at $4,615,000 last year, was a 
regional advertiser five years ago 
spending $65,670 in spot tv, and 
Folger coffee, though regional, spend- 
ing over two and a half times more 
than in 1956. Expenditures for the 
top spot tv brand in 1956 would 



place that brand no better than fifth 
place for 1960. 

The proliferation of brands on the 

market over the past five years made 

itself felt heavilv in spot tv. TvB 

points out. Number of liquid de- 

( Please turn to page 58) 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



45 



Macy's taped its tv 
fashion show in Rome 

featuring French and Italian designer 
originals (worn by model at left, for 
example) and store copies (shown by 
Celeste Holm). It was Macy's third 
tv fashion venture and one of many 
department store spring tv fashion 
shows staged throughout the country 



TV TAKES 




THE FASHION WORLD BY STORM 



^ Print-minded stores like Macy's, Ward, Alexander's, 
Ohrbach's, Hess' are using spot tv to show spring lines 

^ Tv fashion shows are stimulating in-store traffic, 
boosting sales, building images, stores happily report 



I he wooing of retail store adver- 
tising budgets from print to tv has 
seen its first major breakthrough this 
spring. 

Around 50 department stores, in- 
cluding Vlae\ s. Ohrbach's and Alex- 
anders in New York: Montgomery 
Ward in 15 southcentral markets; 
Woodward & Lothrop in Washington, 
D. ('.: and Hess Bros, in Allentown. 
Pa., have staged 30-minute taped 
fashion shows on local tv stations. 

The significance of this break- 
through for spot tv is no small mat- 
ter. For one thing, it is a giant step 
in the over-all education of print- 
entrenched retail and department 
stores, on the flexible uses of tele- 
vision. And. from the general re- 
sults of this fashion swing into tele- 
vision, it looks as if more and more 
stores will be participating in these 
seasonal events. 

There are four main reasons why 
department stores are using tv in a 



big way this year to show their new 
spring-summer lines. These are: 

• To stimulate in-store traffic. 

• To build the store image as a 
high fashion house. 

• To sell the actual clothes shown. 

• To show the creations to a mass 
audience in one shot. 

Although many smaller department 
stores have been using fashion shows 
for several years, it was not until 
spring 1960. when Macy's first show- 
ing of imports and copies was pre- 
sented on WNBC-TV, New York, that 
the tv fashion parade took hold. Since 
then, the idea has spread rapidly. 
Several other stores, including Ohr- 
bach's. Meier & Frank. Portland. 
Ore.: Alexander's and Gimbels in 
Milwaukee, got their feel wet with t\ 
fashion shows last year. 

The biggest news, however, came 
this spring when Montgomery-Ward 
undertook its 15-market regional 
project. This was \\ aid s first dip 



into regional program sponsorship. 
The show was taped at WFAA-'IA . 
Dallas, and spotlighted designers and 
manufacturers from the southwest. 
Purpose of the show was twofold: to 
commemorate the opening of \\ aids 
Dallas buying office, and to stimulate 
sales. Although all results were not 
in at press time. Ward indicated that 
sales, following the show, were "tre- 
mendous." 

The show was produced by Mom* 
gomen Wards public relation- de- 
partment. Individual stores in the 
chains southcentral region were se- 
lected to carry the show. The stores 
bought their own time. The program 
was shown on tape in 12 markets, 
where tape facilities were available. 
and on kinescope in three markets. 

The actual production ran 2<> min- 
utes. The remaining time was give! 
over to individual store managers for 
institutional commercials on behalf of 
their particular Ward branch. 

The department store tv fashion 
show ball got rolling last March in 
\cw York. At thai time, Georgl 
I * 1 1 1 _ retail stores account executive 
at \\ NBC-TV. New York, approached 
Macy's with an idea for a taped fash- 
ion show of imports. Mac\'s liked it. 
Alpine cigarettes sponsored it. and 
the show was a success. 



46 



SPONSOR 



3 \pril 1961 



Sales results were immediate. 
Macy's reported an increase in units 
sold (dresses, suits, coats) of 300 f /r 
and an increase in dollar volume 
from the past season ( of the import 
copy lines I of 400 '/c . 

Macy's followed its initial effort 
with another show in the fall, as did 
Alexander's and Ohrbach's. 

This spring all three were back on 
the air in New York, with more lav- 
ish productions. Macy's was the only 
one with an outside sponsor, Al Italia 
airlines. Ohrbach's and Alexander's 



backed their shows themselves. 

Also hot in the tv fashion activity 
this spring was Hess Bros, of Allen- 
town, which taped its show in the 
store, but aired it over WFIL-TV, 
Philadelphia I Allentown has no tv 
station ) . 

These four stores featured design- 
er imports and store copies. Among 
the designers shown were Balenciaga, 
Givenchy, Monsieur X. Lanvin. Ricci, 
Simonetta, Venezianni, Fabiani, Ca- 
pucci and Rodriguez. 

Here are the highlights of the sea- 



son's major tv fashion shows: 

• Macy's: A pioneer in import 
showings last year, Macy's came back 
this spring wtih a salute to Italian 
and French couturiers, and featured 
the store's U.S.-made copies. The 
show was taped in Rome and shown 
twice on WNBC-TV, New York. It 
featured European and South Ameri- 
can models, songs by Italian singing 
star Domenico Modugno and com- 
mentary by Celeste Holm. It was the 
only tv fashion show to have a spon- 
sor — Al Italia airlines. The show was 



Macy's had immediate results in New York where in store traffic at live fashion shows 

was highly stimulated following the tv presentations. Sales of the clothes shown on tv were also up, said Macy's. 

r I 




* 

. U p s 



^!*#T * jm. 








t^ +&» 



j UJii^^^^ 



CAMERAS move in on Hess Bros.' models showing European originals on the Allentown store's WFIL-TV Philadelphia fashion show. While a handful 
of guests attended the telecast, thousands viewed at home, and store traffic and sales were boosted during the days following the show 



repeated in Atlanta, Ga., where 
Macy's has a store called Davison's. 
Produced by WNBC-TV. Reported 
cost: under $40,000. 

• Ohrbach's: New York high fash- 
ion models showed European imports 
and Ohrbach's copies in a 30-min. 
show taped at W ABC-TV studios. 
Maggie McNellis did commentary, 
Art James was the announcer. Only 
1:50 minutes of institutional commer- 
cials were used. The show emphasized 
close-ups of clothes' details. It was 
repeated on KN XT-TV, Los Angeles, 
where Ohrbach's has a store. Future 
productions are anticipated. Show 
was produced by Ohrbach's agency. 
Doyle Dane Bernbach. Cost: $50,000. 

• Montgomery Ward: A 30-min. 
show, featuring designers and manu- 
facturers from the midwest, was taped 
at WFAA-TV, Dallas, and shown in 
15 southcentral markets where Ward 
has stores. Dallas models were used. 
Dallas tv personality Julie Bonnell did 
commentary. The show was produced 
by Ward's public relations depart- 
ment. Costs: not available. 

• Alexander's: The objective of 
this low-budget store was to stress a 
high fashion image. For this, Alex- 
ander's taped its French, Italian and 
Spanish import and cop] show in 



Aruba, using New York models and 
featuring Orson Bean and Rita Gam 
on commentary. It was shown on 
WCBS-TV. Commercials featured 
the designer original ("price $1,000") 
and the Alexander's copy ("price 
$39.95"). It was produced by Alex- 
ander's. Follovvups are anticipated. 
Reported cast: under $50,000. 

• Hess Bros. : This Allentown, Pa., 
store used WFIL-TV, Philadelphia, to 
air its 30-min. taped fashion show be- 
cause Allentown doesn't have a tv sta- 
tion. The show was produced by Hess 
personnel and featured store-trained 
models. Hess' sales promotion man- 
ager Wayne Holben. was host. It was 
taped in the store. European orig- 
inals were featured but Hess' copies 
were shown in the commercials. News- 
paper tie-ins were extensively used. 
Estimated cost: under $25,000. 

Woodward & Lothrop of Washing- 
ton, D. C, also had a big spring 
splash on tv. It was a salute to Amer- 
ican designers. The show cost W&L 
around $5,000. "Besides stimulating 
store traffic, we had the problem of 
showing our lines to enough people." 
said a W&L spokesman. "The largest 
auditorium suitable for fashion shows 
in D.C., holds 3,000 people, and it is 
i >n eyp nsive to rent.' she said. 



All of these stores promoted their 
tv fashion shows with extensive news- 
paper tie-ins during the week pre- 
ceding the telecast. 

Hess Bros., however, took full-page 
newspaper ads just to publicize theii 
television project. 

Hess also staged a saturation radic 
promotion on behalf of the shov 
with week-long schedules on Wk \P 
and WSAN in Allentown 
in Bethlehem, WEST am 



WAEB 
WGPA 
WEEK in Easton 

Round-the-clock "teasers" also wer 
scheduled on WFIL-TV 

Woodward & Lothrop also hougl 
full-page ads in all Washington. D. C 
newspapers on behalf of their "Terr 
po: U.S.A." telecast 

While the stores were hesitant t 
give actual time and talent costs, of 
the-record estimates ranged froi 
$5,000 for Woodward & Lothrop. t 
around $50,000 for Alexander'.s 

There are some department store 
however, which produce fashion shov 
for as little as $100. TvB"s vice pres 
dent for local sales Howard P. Abn 
hams, pointed out. Among these ai 
Neel's in Thomasville, Ga., and Ah 
Locb in Meridian. Miss., which w. 
local talent and store producers, f( 
(Please turn to page 58) 



48 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 191 



IF YOU CAN'T BEAT THEM . . . 



^ Virginia movie house chain packs in audience by 
sinking 75% of ad budget per film into tv exposure 

Airs five- to 10-minute spots on Norfolk station 
prior to film's opening; enlists personality's support 



here's a motion picture exhibitor 
n Virginia who's more than willing 
o let bygones be bygones with his 
:raditional rival, tv. 

"If you can't beat 'em, join 'em," 
ays Bryan Rose, manager of the Le- 
ine Enterprises which operates 11 
heaters in Norfolk, Portsmouth, 
Eiampton and Newport News. So, 
tie's joined the ranks of tv advertis- 
ers. 

And he sees a trend on the part of 
me motion picture business in gen- 
eral toward using more and more tv 
advertising. According to Rose, ma- 
jor film companies are providing co- 
!op money for their pictures and often 
[the majority of the budgets are going 
to tv rather than newspapers, long 
the major medium for exhibitors. 

By way of explanation. Rose points 
lout, 'The return per dollar spent in 
tv is far greater than the same dollar 
spent in newspapers. The cost of 



newspaper advertising is out of pro- 
portion to the readership and conse- 
quently loses out on our ad dollar." 

Rose precedes the opening of a 
new picture with five to 10 announce- 
ments, usually 60 seconds in length, 
on WVEC-TV, Norfolk. '-Our grosses 
on films are greater than ever, which 
we attribute largely to television," 
Rose states. "The service a tv station 
gives us is far superior in both pro- 
motional excitement and eventual re- 
sults than any other medium." 

The exhibitor receives his tv com- 
mercials from the film producer, with 
excerpts from the picture and a tag 
for theater name and location. In 
placing the spots, he's out to come as 
close as possible to reaching an au- 
dience for which the film will have 
greatest appeal. With children's pic- 
tures, however, it's helpful to fa- 
miliarize parents with what's coming. 

An example of how this approach 



works is the campaign for Walt Dis- 
ney's "Swiss Family Robinson." For 
this film with juvenile appeal, most 
of the spots ran in the Bungles week- 
day evening children's show. Unable 
to resist the ideal tie in, the exhibitor 
also ran an I.D. adjacent to the ABC 
TV Disney Presents program on 
which the film received mention. 

An additional boost to "Swiss 
Family Robinson" came from a per- 
sonal appearance by the WVEC-TV 
personality Bungles at the opening. 
He informed his tv audience he'd be 
on hand for the morning premiere. 
It was 13 degree weather, a bit 
nippy for Norfolk, but they reported- 
ly were lined up around the block an 
hour and a half before starting time. 
By 2:30 p.m. the theater's crowd 
record for one day had been broken. 
At the last report the film was head- 
ing into its ninth week. 

As Rose sees it, one of the most 
important phases of promotion for 
new pictures is the service a tv sta- 
tion can give. "The fact that a sta- 
tion can furnish personalities to help 
us put pictures across is extremely 
important," he says. "The stations 
have built their personalities over a 
long period of time, and we consider 
their following a valuable bonus." ^ 



ALLIANCE has proven beneficial to Bryan Rose, (I), gen. mgr. of Levine Enterprises in Virginia, and Bill Barnes, a.e. from WVEC-TV, Norfolk 




CANADIAN TV: A SECOND BIRTK 



^ With the opening; of nine new major market private 
stations, advertisers now have alternatives to the CBC 

^ Here is a review of the events that made possible 
new opportunities; Weed relates them to U. S. sponsor 



#%merican advertisers in search of 
opportunities should lav their com- 
passes on the conference-room tahle 
and watch them jump around to the 
north. That's Canada up there — a 
"8300 billion challenge," according 
to a leading I . S. and Canadian sta- 
tion representative. Weed & Co. 

For in mid-March, the American 
(and Canadian I advertiser had. for 
the first time, a realistic alternative 
to network tv in the nation to the 
north due to the completion of a 
string of "second stations." not gov- 
ernment-owned, in the major markets. 

With the latest of the big city 
"free-enterprise independents" just 
gone on the air bringing the total to 
nine, the advertiser will no longer be 
forced to depend on the overcrowded 



CBC network stations to bid for his 
share of the $300 billion that Weed 
maintains will be spent by Canadians 
in the 1%0's. 

To a great extent, Canadians them- 
selves consider this a second coming 
df Canadian tv in the eight major 
markets I two new stations are in 
Montreal I . because CBC stations had 
been practically sold out, especially 
in prime time, for the past six years. 
This has kept many advertisers out 
of the medium; it has accelerated the 
trend to co-sponsorship and multi- 
ple sponsorships; it has forced other 
advertisers to work out selective 
deals with two-dozen or more sec- 
ondary markets and then use other 
media for coverage in major cities. 

Also, creation of a string of sec- 



ond stations brought about the prac- 
ticability of the first privately-ownei 
network, which has just been formed 
by Spence Caldwell. One drawback 
to the tv progress, advertisers noted! 
was that the new stations, cutting 
into the audiences of the established 
outlets, would mean a higher cost- 
per-1,000. But station men pointed 
out that Canadian tv was still a bar- 
gain at the price compared to the 50 
States to the south. 

Weed & Co. presents a facts and 
figures analysis of the new situation 
in a thick new presentation that out- 
lines the history of Canadian tv and 
the background leading up to the es- 
tablishment of the new stations. The 
stated purpose: to lure the American 
ad dollar to Canadian tv. Weed, 
which represents 29 north-of-the- 
border outlets, covers just about 
every aspect of what the U. S. adver- 
tiser should know about Canada — its 
economy, its potential, its possibili- 
ties. Among the more specific media 
questions that Weed answers: 

Do I need a Canadian advertising 
agency? Not necessarily. It is pos- 




Some basic questions about the major market private stations 



Q. What about time avails? 

A. Time can be bought — as opposed to the CBC 
crush — on the new stations: CFCF-TV, Mon- 
treal (English); CFTM-TV, Montreal (French); 
CHAN-TV, Vancouver; CJ AY-TV, Winnipeg; 
CFTO-TV, Toronto; CJOH-TV, Ottawa-Hull; 
CJCH-TV, Halifax; CFRN-TV, Edmonton, and 
CFCN-TV, Calgary. 



Q. Is CBC needed for coverage? 

A. Not necessarily, as the new independents al- 
low an advertiser to achieve nation-wide coverage 



via "selective tv" (like U. S. spot program place- 
ment). This method is made-to-order for the 
American advertiser interested in keeping ad effort 
in line with distribution. He can also buy spot an- 
nouncements; units as small as a single station. 

Q. What are rates like? 

A. The nine new "second stations" have a poten- 
tial coverage of 66-70% of Canadian tv house- 
holds. Their rates are slightly lower than the CBC 
outlets: In Toronto, class A one-time half-hour on 
CBLT is $750; on new CFTO, $690. In Vancou- 
ver, class A one-time half-hour on CBUT is $408; 




50 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



sible for a U. S. advertiser or agency 
to place business directly on Cana- 
dian tv through its U. S. offices. 

What programs are available for 
sponsorship? Programs fall into 
three categories — national, regional 
and local. National sponsorship: 
Many "proven" U. S. shows are syn- 
dicated for use in Canada, such as 
Maverick, Gunsmoke, Peter Gunn 
and Route 66. Independently pro- 
duced film programs are available 
for syndication as in the U. S., and 
Canadian produced shows are taped 
by production companies and inde- 
pendent stations. CBC live shows 
are available. Regional: With the ex- 
ception of network productions, all 
of the above are available for re- 
gional or "selected market" ( like 
U. S. spot program placement ) 
sponsorship. Local: U. S. produced 
film shows can be purchased directly 
from the individual station. You can 
also purchase locally produced shows 
— news, weather, women's features, 
etc.) 

Including time, what does a net- 
work show cost? A half-hour show 
carried on the CBC English network 
costs approximately $13,000 per 
week, assuming a net program price 
of $5,000. 




LATEST MATERIAL to alert the American advertiser to the growing potential of the 
changing Canadian tv markets has been published by Joseph J. Weed (I), president of the 
Weed organization, and Peter McGurlc, v. p. and general manager of Weed & Company 



Including time, what will selective 
television cost? You cannot compare 
network with selective television in 
this manner, since the very basis of 
selective tv is that an advertiser may 
choose the exact market lists he 
wants. 

As a guide, however, let's suppose 
your selective plan is intended to 
cover 80% of the television homes in 
English Canada. Assuming a pro- 
gram cost of $2,250 net, the total 
weekly price would be approximately 
$9,500. In addition, with a good 
property having more audience ap- 
peal than its CBC competition, your 
"80% of Canada" selective plan 



could very likely reach more homes 
per broadcast than a full network 
placement. And it would do so at 
lower cost. 

As a matter of fact, depending on 
the extent to which you use a pool of 
commercials here, you may be able 
to run them in Canada without in- 
curring any extra talent residual 
payments. Your advertising agency 
will be able to figure this out for 
you. Of course, if your commercials 
are "voice over," you can use them 
in French-speaking Canada once 
you've replaced the track. Also, many 
stations produce commercials, using 
[Please turn to page 79) 



. : 

::v::.;;;-:i:^^ 



If^^By^ 



and their availabilities, coverage, rates, and program policies 



on new CHAN, $360. Rates are set in hopes to de- 
liver as much audience as CBC competitors; sta- 
tions must also amortize huge facilities. 

Q. Are they getting audiences? 

A. The new stations have generally done well at 
capturing audience. In Calgary, Halifax and Mon- 
treal, new stations have about split audience with 
older rivals — and "total" audience has increased. 
Toronto station is in close fight; Vancouver outlet 
hasn't yet caught opposition; Winnipeg's new chan- 
nel leads in the latest report. In Edmonton, CBC 
won't have affiliate until next Fall. 



Q. Any program restrictions? 

A. You can sponsor any form of programing on 
the independent outlets. The CBC, on the other 
hand, does not permit sponsorship of news broad- 
casts or programs falling into public affairs cate- 
gory. 

Q. Any product restrictions? 

A a The situation is changing. For instance, beer 
advertising was formerly not acceptable, can now 
be run on stations in the provinces of Quebec and 
Ontario. It is anticipated that restrictions will be 
eased in other provinces as well. 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



.. 



51 



With the importance off ad effectiveness, SPONSOR ASKS: 

What makes a tv 

commercial believable? 




Norton Wolf, vice president and crea- 
tive supervisor, Benton & Bowles, Inc., 
New York 

Believability — like beauty — is in 
the eye of the beholder. To what de- 
gree is believability also in the hand 
of the creator — the writer? Let's see. 

The first thing that makes a com- 
mercial believable is whether or not 



// hat the 
writer asks 

the beholder 
to believe is 
a major 
consideration 



the writer believes in the product. 
It's not necessary or desirable to 
achieve a state of ecstasy. But you 
at least ought to figure you could 
look your dear old fifth grade teach- 
er square in the eye and tell her your 
sales story, without getting sent to 
the principal's office for either fib- 
bing or cribbing. 

The second thing that makes a 
commercial believable is what you 
ask the beholder to believe. Will it 
be something new, valuable, surpris- 
ing, and important to the most im- 
portant person of all: himself? Or 
will it be humdrum, ho-hum, old hat, 
braggy, impersonal? Lest we forget, 
no one has ever found a substitute 
for the selling idea. 

Next, how many things will you 
ask the beholder to believe? How 
glibly we say (and quickly forget) 
that it's far easier for the viewer to 
absorb and believe one idea than 
three ideas, in 60 seconds — or 60 
weeks, for that matter. 

Fourth, b) what means will you 
ask the beholder to believe? Shall 
you appeal to reason or imagination 
— or both? Will you be factual or 
fanciful, dreamy or dramatic? You 
mav soar as airily as you like for a 
perfume, and you will be believed — 
sometimes. You can be doggedly 
down to earth for a detergent, and 
you will be believed — sometimes. 

Whv sometimes ves. sometimes 



no? I'm convinced the answer lies 
entirely in the experience, judgment, 
taste and enthusiasm of the writer. 
The good writer uses his freedom to 
explore and to select. He disciplines 
himself to be simple and direct. He 
makes every word, every picture, 
everj second, every frame complete- 
ly relevant to the product, the selling 
idea, and to the beholders needs and 
experience. 

And now, before we chisel (hoc 
thoughts in stone, let us remember 
Alice who declared, "One can't be- 
lieve impossible things." To which 
the White Queen replied, "I daresay 
you haven't had much practice. . . . 
Why, sometimes I've believed as 
manv as six impossible things before 
breakfast." 

Joseph McDonough, vice president 
and associate creative director, Cunning- 
ham & Walsh Inc., New York 
The simplest way to make a tele- 
vision commercial believable is to 
have the commercial constructed by 
people who recognize the truth. When 
these people work on the commercial: 
when the writer writes a commer- 
cial he believes in . . . 
when the art director draws a 

storyboard he believes in . . . 
when the account executive sells a 

storyboard he believes in . . . 
when the client O.K.'s a story- 
board he believes in . . . 
when the agency producer pro- 
duces a storyboard he believes 
in . . . 
when each one of the above does 

what he truly believes in 
. . . then you'll have a believable 

commercial. 
In other words, when the selling 
message and the presentation is truth- 
ful .. . the commercial is believable. 
Then, once the storyboard is 
turned over to a film producer and 
. . . the actors . . . the director . . . 
the camera director . . . the set de- 
signer . . . when all the people on the 
film, believe in the film — you'll get a 
believable film. 

A television commercial that is not 



believable is like any other "phoney" 
. . . sooner or later the public rec- 
ognizes the "phoney" and they stop 
believing . . . they stop buying. 

Perhaps it's seeing on television 
the same model/actor attempting to 
sell two different products on the 
same night. Neither of these products 
are for the particular use of model/ 
actors. The model/actor does not dis- 
play any expert knowledge of either 
of the products. So ... I do not 
believe him. He's a moonlighter. 
Two jobs and no sales. 

Maybe that wild set is an art di- 
rector's dream but it doesn't even 
remotely resemble my bathroom. 
Mine's always a mess. I'd be afraid 
to use that one. Howinthehell am I 
going to get into that sunken tub? 

Perhaps it's a beer, a good beer, I 
like your beer. But it doesn't make 



When both the 
.selling message 
and selling 
presentation 
are truthful 



me laugh. Not just a sip, anyhow. 
And I don't want that much energy. 
I'm too tired to run up that beach. 
And that athletic young thing that's 
chasing him! I know she'd be too 
much for me. 

Advertising is a simple business. 
Advertising is an aid to selling. 
As such, it should put forth some 
simple, logical selling messages for 
a product. In order for people to 
accept these selling messages they 
should be presented in a believable 
way. 

Let's do it. 

Richard J. Mercer, vice president and 

creative group supervisor, Batten, Barton, 
Durstine & Osborn, Inc., New York 
A believable commercial like a be- 
lievable person has no affectations. 
It is first of all frankly what it is: a 
commercial. It doesn't try to kid 
(Please turn to page 56) 




52 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



wHsEITOMIinM 



SATURDAY NIGHT JAN.- FEB. 




ARB AVERAGE RATING -10:00-1 1:45 




KSD (Gold Award Theatre) RATING 


SHARE 


Showing "Films of the 50's" 22 


46% 


Station "B" 18 


37% 


Station "C" 6 


13% 


Station "D" 2 


4% 



The overwhelming superiority of Warner's "Films of the 50's" was dem- 
onstrated during the January 6 -February 2 survey period in St. Louis. 
During this time, these Seven Arts feature films were telecast exclu- 
sively over KSD's "Gold Award Theatre" sponsored by Beautyrama, Inc. 

They scored their high rating against two other feature film programs. 

Beautyrama will continue to sponsor the "Gold Award Theatre" and will 
continue to telecast the Seven Arts' "Films of the 50's." 

These recent films from Warner's library of big-star hits do as well 
against top network shows as they do against other feature films. Exam- 
ple: KTVU in San Francisco on Sunday night scored a smashing 36.2 
share of audience, higher by 50% than the next best station, against 
such tough competition as Shirley Temple, Lassie, Dennis the Menace, 
Walt Disney and Maverick. 

Warner's Films of the 50's . . , Money makers nf the 60's 




SEVEN ARTS 

ASSOCIATED 

CORP. 



NEW YORK: 270 Park Avenue 
CHICAGO: 8922-D La Crosse, Skokie, 
DALLAS: 5641 Charlestown Drive 
BEVERLY HILLS: 232 Reeves Drive 



YUkon 6-1717 

OR 4-5105 

ADams 9-2855 

GRanite 6-1564 



For list of TV stations programming Warner's Films ot the 50's see Page One SRDS (Spot TV Rates and Data) 



WPTF 

Raleigh-Durham 




>"1 B \\ yz rr 
ha; TWICE 

as many 
adult listeners 

1 Jtl/ijS any other station in 
the nation's 28th radio market. 

Source: 32- county area PULSE: 



WPTF 


55.1% 


Station B 


24.1 


Station C 


5.2 


Station D 


9.2 


Station E 


6.4 


^TIONTSX 
28th RADIO I 
MARKET j)L 

%. NIELSEN oj Jf r 1 """ 


A' va. "v. 



50,000 WATTS 680 KC 

NBC Alliliale lor Roleigh Durham 

and lo'.iern North Carolina 

R H. Mason, General Manager 

Gus Youngsleadt, Sales Monoger 

PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 

Notional ffcp'esei'o'i^es 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



54 






SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 



North American Philips Co., Inc., New York: Approximately 
$700,000 will be spent on Norelco's second-quarter campaign, with 

130 or more stations getting heavy weekend schedules. The first 
group of markets begins J! April for three to six weeks, depending on 
market, using around 40 spots per week per station, day and night 
60's, 20's and I.D.'s .The top 10 markets are two-station buys: all 
others one. Buyer: Boh Cogliero. Agency: C. J. La Roche Co.. N. Y, 

Ceneral Foods Corp., Perkins Div., Chicago: Going into about 
30 markets with Kool-Aid schedules this month. Kid show minutes 
and day minutes. 20's and I.D.'s are set for 10 weeks. Bu\er: Dorothy 
Framherz. Agency: Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago. 
Swift & Co., Chicago: Plans are for a new nine-week run for Pard 
Crunchers, to start late April. As with the schedules that ended mid- 
March, about 50 markets will be bought with daytime minutes being 
used. Buyer: Marianne Lixie. Agenc\ : Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. 
Inc.. Chicago. 

Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati: Placements for Zest start 4 
April and run through the P&G contract year, in about 50 markets. 
Schedules are prime and fringe minutes only. Buyers: Jim Court ney 
and Don Hotaling. Agency: Benton & Bowles. New York. 
Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York: Halo Shampoo campaign be- 
gins earl) this month in 80 markets. Schedules of prime I.D.'s will 
run for eight weeks, four to six spots per week per market. Buyer: 
Bob Lazetera. Agency: D'Arcy Ad\. Co., New York. 
Carter Products, Inc., New York: Campaign for Rise and Arrid 
starts early April for 26 weeks. Moderate frequencies of early and 
late night minutes are placed in about 25 markets. Buyer: Jeanne 
Sullivan. Agency: SSCB. New York. 

Lever Bros. Co., New York: Silver Dust Blue lineup starts 9 April 
in about 25 markets. Daytime and fringe night minutes will he sched- 
uled for six weeks. Buyer: Chuck Woodruff. Agency : SSCB, N. Y. 

RADIO BUYS 

Hekman Biscuit Co., Grand Rapids: Three-week campaign for its 
crackers starts 1 Mav in about 20 markets. Schedules of 20's to reach 
a housewife audience are being used. Buyer: Audre\ Thorelius. 
Agency : George H. Hartman Co., Chicago. 

Miller Brewing Co., Milwuakee: About 10 midwestern and north- 
western markets are set for schedules this month. Drive-time minutes 
and 30's will be used for 20 to 39 weeks, depending on market. 
Agency : Mathisson & \sso„ Milwaukee. 

Esso Standard Oil Co., New York: Its spring-summer campaign 
begins mid-April for 22 weeks. Weekend-only schedules of traffic 
minutes will be bought in 25-30 markets. Buyer: Joe Granda. 
Agency: McCann-Frickson, New York. 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



wsb-tv 
first in 
king-size 
feature 
packages 
in Atlanta ! 



jflfe# : * 





Top movies (lots of them), well programmed, result in rating leadership 
for WSB-TV. Audience interest is excited by showcasing movies like 
"High and the Mighty" and Judy Garland's "A Star is Born"- series 
like "Best of Gable"- sneak previews and color premieres! Superior 
programming that's made possible by using Warner's "Films of the 
50's", RKO's "Post-48's", MGM and Paramount libraries, Shirley 
Temple and Tarzan packages, and 20th Century Fox movies. This all 
adds up to king-size audiences for advertisers on WSB-TV. 



Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution. NBC affiliate. Associated with WSOC/WSOC-TV, Charlotte; WHIO. WHIO-TV, Dayton. 



CHANNEL 2 



wsb-tv 



ATLANTA 



SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 1961 



55 



II 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 52) 

anybod) into thinking it is anything 
else. Il is, in a word, honest. 

But honest) alone will not neces- 
sarily make a commercial believable. 



Be honestly 
commercial, tell 
the truth, in- 
volve i iei< er's 
emotion* 



For credulity on the part of the view- 
er or listener is a product not only of 
his intellect hut his emotions as well. 
Therefore while a believable com- 
mercial must first of all be truthful. 
it must convey its truth through emo- 
tional channels. This of course is a 
matter of art. 

And that is why the advertising 
business will always be peopled with 
writers and artists. It is the main 
task of these creative people to find 
the happy phrase, the fascinating 
image that makes the truth about a 
product or service more than a dull 





inventorj of facts, but an interesting, 
memorable piece of communication. 

That is win the Nearsighted Mis- 
ter Magoo sells General Electric 
Light Bulhs. Everything he says 
about General Klectric Bulbs is the 
absolute truth. But when Magoo 
says it. it's so much more fun and 
more believable, too. Why? Be- 
cause it involves the viewer. 

Another animated character, Hy 
Finn, tells the truth about Chevron 
Supreme Gasoline: it is a true super- 
octane fuel for today's more power- 
ful cars. And then, he always adds a 
further truth, such as "Chevron Su- 
preme Gasoline fits any shape gas 
tank." And sudden!) a simple sales 
message takes on a fresh point of 
view that stimulates the heart as well 
as the mind. 

Both the General Electric Light 
Bulb and the Chevron Supreme Gas- 
oline campaigns have been extremely 
successful. They are evidently then 
highly believable. They do more than 
tell the truth, they also get the viewer 
involved in it. 

What makes a believable commer- 
cial? Truth plus art. Be honestly 
commercial, tell the truth. ^ 



TOP AVAILS 

(Continued from page 44) 

heuser-Busch executives. That first 
year, 16 million 6-Paks of Budweiser 
were sold during the promotion. In 
1959, and again in 1960, 20 million 
6-Paks were moved during the two- 
month period. Expectations for the 
1961 promotion are high. Budweiser 
expects to overtake its last year's rec- 
ord. In addition to the success of 
Budweiser 6-Pak sales, said Krings, 
every package and brand in the An- 
heuser-Busch line increased beyond 
normal sales during June-July. 

Krings says that during the "Pick 
a Pair" promotion, the company en- 
courages retailers to give a little in- 
centive price break to the consumer 
in order to make the buy-two deal 
attractive. 

Although national beer sales vol- 
ume is on the rise, marketing prob- 
lems are becoming more complex for 
big brewers. Foremost among these 
is the share of market inroads being 
made bv unadvertised, private label 
brands. Bien told the reps that the 
non-advertised brands are becoming 
a major factor in the brewing indus- 
try. Sold chiefly through supermar- 
kets and grocery chains, the private 



labels account for between 30-3595 
of total sales volume, predominate!] 
in Florida and California. 

Beer ranks fifth in dollar sales in 
the grocery industry, ahead of all 
other items except fresh meats, fresh 
and fio/en vegetables and fruit. Ac- 
cording to \nheuser-Busch, there is 
a 20' i retail profit margin on beer. 
putting it well ahead of health and 
beauty aids in grocer] store profit 
building. 

Although I960 was the largest 
year in the history of American brew- 
ing, per capita consumption (15 gal- 
lons per year) is not going up. The 
increase in beer consumption is due 
to population rise . 

One marketing problem that 
brewers have not been able to over- 
come, says Bien, is the lack of ac- 
ceptance of beer as a social drink. 
Budweiser is attempting to make in- 
roads here by promoting beer as a 
with-meal beverage. 

Budweiser's advertising philosophy 
in radio and tv commercials has al- 
days been soft sell, gently emphasiz- 
ing the. "Where There's Life There's 
Bud" theme. "But for the June and 
July 'Pick a Pair' push we shout for 
the order," said John C. Macheca, 
D'Arcy v. p. and Budweiser a/e. 

In outlining Budweiser's market- 
ing objectives for this summer's 
"Pick a Pair" promotion, Macheca 
told the reps at the Florida get-to- 
gether: "We make no demands of 
you, nor do we insist on anv kind of 
merchandising support. But we do 
ask for your suggestions and \mjr 
help because we need it." 

The reps agreed that the business 
sessions, while conducted in an en- 
vironment of casual informality, were 
concentrated and intense. But An- 
heuser-Busch provided time for their 
guests to enjoy some native Florida 
attractions. Highlights of these, in 
addition to Busch Gardens and the 
brewery tour, was an exhibition game 
between the St. Louis Cardinals and 
Detroit Tigers at Al Lang Field, and 
"Pick a Pair" night at Tampa's fa- 
mous Jai a-Lai games. 

The Budweiser people expressed 
profound appreciation to the reps for 
their help in past promotions. Said 
Kring, in closing the meetings. "We 
have a deep and tremendous spirit of 
gratitude toward all of you who 
helped build up the promotion. What 
you have done has made it a standi 
out all across America." ^ 



56 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961> 



OCEANS OF RAVES 



m 

H 
X 
73 



'Edwards Shoes (Sponsor) ex- 
ited about DIVER DAN. After 
inly three programs, WCAU-TV 
ind client impressed. This show 
a winner." 

Al Fingerman, 

Ernest William Greenfield, Inc. 




Killer 
Squid 



DIVER DAN at 4:30-5:15 P.M. 
. . (period) . . . number one in 

itingS." Bob Guy, Program Director, 
WWL-TV, New Orleans 



Skipper 
Kipper 



# 



;-,;.%-^^ 
^T\ 




Kids will be fascinated by the 
nderwater movement. The ae- 
on has an hypnotic effect that 
takes you follow the characters, 
ids will love it ... We have al- 
ays been ahead of the trend. 
IVER DAN's gonna be big! It 
ill be a winner!" 

George W. Cyr, Program Manager, 
WGR-TV, Buffalo 



Finley 
Haddock 



Just a note to let you know that 
lhave heard from Ernie Greup 
| WTVD about DIVER DAN. He 
Jiys: ". . . Their (ITC's) product 
i a great one. Our children view- 
• s scream for DIVER DAN to 
ome back." 

Donald A. Pels, Controller, 
Capital Cities Broadcasting 



Baron 
Barracuda 



The new concept inherent in 
te DIVER DAN series is very ex- 
ciing ... A great success!" 

Warren Wright, Program Manager, 
WFBM-TV, Indianapolis 





Delightful . . . different . . . completely flexible 
. . . Exploits of the fearless explorer, Diver Dan 
. . . the beautiful mermaid . . . and the wonder- 
ful puppet-fish ... all part of this underwater 
live-and-puppet adventure in color and black- 
and-white. Can be shown as you see fit. One 
adventure flows into another for a half-hour, a 
15-minute series, or include 7-minutes of 
DIVER DAN in your own local program. 



2 
O 

o 
o 

Z 

3> 
D 

< 

m 

z 

H 
C 
7} 

m 



m 

73 




Already sold: New York, Chicago, 
Philadelphia, Indianapolis, Buffalo, 
Cincinnati, New Orleans, Seattle, St. 
Louis, Detroit and other top mar- 
kets. Keystations KTVI-TV, 
WKRC-TV, WGR-TV, WWJ-TV, 
KKTV-TV, WCAU-TV, WFBM- 
TV, KOMO-TV, WGN-TV, WFRV- 
TV, WNEW-TV, WJAC-TV, 
WREX-TV, WTVD-TV, etc., etc. 
For TV's newest co/or-ful entertain- 
ment-success for the whole family, 
phone or wire today. 



INDEPENDENT TELEVISION CORPORATION 



488 Madison Avenue • New York 22, N.Y. • PLaza 5-2100 
100 University Avenue • Toronto 1, Ontario • EMpIre 2-1166 




SPOT TV 

{Continued from page 15) 

tergents represented on the medium 

jumped from two to eight, compact 
automobiles from one t<> nine, cig- 
arettes from 23 to 36. 

While no sprav starches were on 
the scene back in 1950. nine were 
present on spot t\ last year. The in- 
stant potato roster rose from two to 
seven. 

fhere is an examination of share 
of spot tv expenditures 1>\ product 
category. \mong the more dramatic 



changes over the past five years is the 

household cleaners group which rose 
from 1.7' i of total spot tv dollars 
~p.nl in 1956 to 5', last year. This 
reflects the influx of competition to 
Lestoil, formerly uncontested. 

Another sizeable increase in share 
took place in household laundr\ 
products, up from 4.1'. in 1956 to 
7.395 last year. By far the largest 
share for both years comes from 
food and grocery products, off slight- 
ly from 27.1 '< 6ve years ago to 
20.7', in I960. 




YOU'RE ONLY 

HALF-COVERED 

IN NEBRASKA 



IF YOU DON'T USE KOLN-TV! 




ana|ocaP 

D DDQCIO 



3DQ 



KOLN-TV DELIVERS THE 
MAXIMUM AUDIENCE IN NEBRASKA* 

Gunsmoke 69,700 homes 

Father Knows Best. .77,700 homes 
6:00 p.m. News. . .76,000 homes 
10:00 p.m. News. .64,000 homes 

•February Lincoln NSI 



imzo-rv — BUM unDS-uuMizoo 

WHO «»oio — Mumuzoo-unii ctfa 
wjo uoio — gund iutids 

WKF-FM — CUND MPIOS KJUIUZOO 
wwrv — c»oiiut -i«»vi«S[ an 

■OIN-rV — UNC01N. NtlRASHA 




This is Lincoln-Land — KOLN-TVs NCS 
No. 3. Figures show percentages of TV 
homes reached weekly, day or night. 

Focus your attention on Nebraska's tele- 
vision markets, and you'll see there are 
just two big ones — the extreme East and 
Lincoln-Land. 

Three top TV stations compete for 
viewers' attention in the Eastern market 
— obviously dividing it three ways. Hut 
in Lincoln-Land just one station really 
covers the area— that's KOLN-TV! 

More than 57.000 Lincoln-Land homes 
tune in KOLN-TV during prime 6 to 9 
p.m. viewing time, according to latest 
Nielsen. Compare this with any other 
station in Nehraska. Then compare cost- 
per-thousand figures for nighttime net- 
work shows. 

Avcry-Knodel will give you the com- 
plete story on KOLN-TV — the Official 
Basic CBS Outlet for South Central 
Nebraska and Northern Kansas. 



K0LNTV 

CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • 10OO-FT. TOWER 

COVlli LINCOLN-LAND — NEBRASKA'S OTHH IIO MARKET 

Avry-Knoa'it, Inc., fxc/ufiva National ••pr«i«nfoftV«i 



\ ~lighi increase of share over the 
five \ear period was registered by 
cosmetics and toiletries (from <'>.0'< 
to 9.2' , i. \iuong those whose share 
declined: tobacco products (down 
from 7.0' i to 5.8$ I; dental prod- 
ucts i from 3.3' i to L.9' < i : house- 
hold equipment (from 1.9' < to 

1.1', I. 

T\ B took note of over 35 different 
associations, councils and bureaus 

that spent more than $300,000 last 
year in spot tv to promote intangi- 
bles, as opposed to a specific adver- 
tisers product. Their causes in- 
cluded coffee, tea. cement, lamb, 
wine, motor boats, cherries, seeds] 
oil heat. pine, insurance and banks. 

Among other spot tv users in the 
intangibles category last year, TvB 
cites: 34 different banks in more than 
one market: 91 insurance companies; 
116 public utilities and telephone 
companies 17 religious groups. 

Also examined was spot tv's use- 
fulness in promoting expensive items. 
In the medium last year: 125 com- 
panies offering large-ticket household 
appliances; 56 automobile makes; 
four tractors; 11 trailers; seven 
trucks; three swimming pools; five 
motor boats, and eight foreign air- 



FASHIONS 

{Continued from page 48) 
their regularly scheduled tv fashion 
shows. There are no SAG require- 
ments in these markets, keeping talent 
and production costs nominal. 

The larger stores, however, have a 
rougher, or shall we say. more intei 
esting time. In producing the sho 
in Rome. WNBC-TV and Macy 
worked under a very tight plan 
schedule, prayed for good flying am 
shooting weather, and got the whol 
show under wraps within a matter 
days. Producer-director Mel Lond 
associate producer John Dorsey, u 
manager Dick Barnhill and coordi 
tor George Pitt, arrived in Rome si 
eral days before the copies and ori 
inals were flown there from New Yo 
to set up locations, hire mobile un 
and crews. Macy's had the weath 
they hoped for, and the entire pri 
duction schedule was carried out. 

Ohrbach"s. however, wasn't so lucky 
- weatherwise. Doyle Dane Bernj 
bach's original plan was to shoot thtj 
show on Long Island's beaches, bujf 
as radio/tv director Don Trevor. -ai<i 
"after seeing that the models lookedlii 



58 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



ARE YOUR 

^MilNllTE 

Commercials 

out Ay Sea? 



LOS ANGELES is famed for inge- 
nuity—but even in Los Angeles, 
no one has discovered how to put 
a 60-second commercial into a 
20-second availability. 

Thus your minutes are forced 
to fringe times on some Los 
Angeles stations. Or, marooned 
within inferior programming on 
other stations. 

To give greater selling effective- 
ness to your minutes in Los 
Angeles, just turn the page . . . 




A 



I ONSOR o 3 ATRIL 1961 



59 



frozen, we headed back for the \\ ABC- 
TV studios and did the job there." 
The sets achieved the same desired 
effect as the location -hots, he said. 

\\ hat is the future of department 
stores in t\ ? I p to the last J ear or so 
their acti\ it\ has been limited to some 
spot t\. There is no doubt that de- 
partment stores are print-oriented. 
The) arc steeped in print tradition 
and their creative people have been 
print-trained. 

But, from all indications, they want 
to learn about t\. "M\ contact with 
stores all over the count r\ has shown 
me that retailers don't know whether 
to use spots, to lui\ a local show, to 
use direct or indirect sell. The sta- 
tions don't know what to tell the 
stores and the stores' own copywrit- 
ers don't know how to approach tv." 
said Morris Rosenblum, creative di- 
rector, advertising, for Macy's. De- 
partment stores must he educated, 
and those stores that can afford it. 
must gain experience through experi- 
mentation."' 

Rosenblum feels that stores should 
approach tv in much the same way 
that they use print, "for image build- 
ins. merchandising. s a'es and institu- 



tional messages." 

Mai \ 's itself has increased its l\ 
advertising to a very significant fig- 
ure in the last four years. The store 
has a 52-week contract for 21 week- 
ly spots woth \Y\BC-TV and also 
uses t w ■ » other New York independ- 
ent stations regular!} . 

All the stores which had fashion 
shows this spring indicated to SPONSOR 
that thej planned to return with them 
in the future. 

Vs for results, each store reported 
that in-store sales and traffic follow- 
ing the shows were hypoed tremen- 
dousl) h\ the impact of their tv ven- 
ture. 

However, the New York stores in 
particular don't expect to do better 
than break even. But as one Ohr- 
bach's spokesman said, "the long- 
term image effects of such a show 
are well worth it." 

Ohrbach's has been strictly a print 
and billboard advertiser up to now. 
One major reason for not using tv, 
savs Mark Klauser. the store's adver- 
tising and publicity director, is "we 
can't get the time spots that we'd like 
at a good cost.'' 

Tn the case of thp recent tv fashion 



show, Klauser pointed out, Ohrbach's 
was able to talk to its regular custom- 
ers as well a> potential buyers, and 
was well satisfied. 

Obi bach'- has had tremendous 
identification on tv in the past how- 
ever, as a supplier of clothes for dav- 
time and evening net tv shows. 

What about fashion -how- on the 
networks? Just before Macy's initial 
venture la>t March. NBC TA ran 
Pond's Ala Mode, a network fashion 
-bow stressing Parisian couture. The 
-bow mixed entertainment with fash- 
ion and scored "verj low ratings." 

"Fashions don't lend themselves to 
network t\.' Macy's public relations 
director Edrie \ an Dore said. "This 
is a big COUntT) and there i- no such 
thing as "the American look." In the 
south the women go for chiffon and 
(lowers, in New England, -nits and 
coats and in New York, black 
dresses," she pointed out. 

It looks like fashion show- will re- 
main a natural for spot tv. "I ntil re- 
cent years, these shows were held ir 
store auditoriums, or selling floors.' 
TvB's Abrahams pointed out. "Bi 
today we see tv is the only possibl 
medium for this purpose." 



NO.M in BOSTON 

WNAC-TV 

Between 7 P.M. and 11 P.M. 
On January 1st WNAC-TV shifted to ABC-TV and 
immediately jumped to FIRST PLACE in prime time! 




ARB Share — Sunday thru 


Saturday 7 


P.M. - 1 1 P.M. | 




WNAC-TV 


Station A 


Station B 


Dec. 1960 


31.4 


29.5 


39.1 


Jan. 1961 


37.2 


28.5 


34.3 




-j-18% 


—3% 


-12% 


Nielsen Share — Sunday thru 


Saturday 7 


P.M. - 1 1 P.M. 




WNAC-TV 


Station A 


Station B 


Nov. 1960 


30.3 


31.2 


38.5 


Feb. 1961 


39.5 


31.4 


29.1 




+30% 


- - 


—24% 



■ . ■ • 



WfiFM 



An RKO GENERAL SUtlon 



For prime availabilities contact your WNAC-TV H-R Representative 



60 



SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 1961 




. mm 

lasrSiwnHi 



minutes are "captai 
the channel on KTTV. 

In Southern California, only 
KTTV can give you this combr 
nation : 

1. Full Minute Commercials... 

2. Throughout Prime Evening 
Hours ... 

3. In An Every-Night Schedul 
of Important Programs* 

Check the shows on KTTV. Check 
the ca(iber of the accounts within 
the shows. Your minutes wilt geT 
the time . . . the treatment . . . and 
the audience they deserve or 
KTTV. 



Times- Mirror 
Broadcasting Company 
5746 Sunset Boulevard 



month), Tightrope, M-Squad, 
Cimarron City (starts this month), 
Divorce Court. 



SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 1961 



61 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional radio campaigns 



RADIO RESULTS 



OFFICE PERSONNEL 

SPONSOR: Kelh Girl Service, In,. VGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: kcll\ Girl Service. Inc., one of the 
leading temporary office services in the country, decided to 
place a campaign on K.DK A to remind businessmen and ex- 
ecutives in the Pittsburgh area of its full line of office 
help: secretaries, stenographers, typists, comptometer opera- 
tors, key punch operators and other clerical workers. Sched- 
ule was for four one-minute announcements per week on 
Rege Cordic's 6 to 10 a.m. show. Cordic and Company, 
which features comedy skits, service features and music. 
Commercials, with a clever opening to "Mr. Boss/" pitched 
>|iced and economy. Results, according to A. W. Leonard. 
Pittsburgh branch manager for Kelly: ''Our spots on KDKA 
increased our dominance in the market. We began to no- 
tice a sales reaction from the very first week of the sched- 
ule.'" After two months on the air. a careful check by 
Leonard showed that the radio advertising on KDKA 
had increased business a full 25'f for Kelly Girl Service. 
KDKA, Pittsburgh Announcements 



FOOD 

SPONSOR: Trout Foods, Inc. AGENCY : Dir« 

Capsule case history: Over the past 10 years. Troa 

Foods. Inc.. distributors of pretzels, potato chips, corn curU 
cookies and like products in Reading. York and W ilk. 
Barre. Pa., has grown from five employees and three truck 
to 28 employees and 17 trucks. The real growth period be 
gan three years ago when Trout intensified its radio car 
paign and allocated 80'/ of the ad budget to WEEU fo 
sponsorship of Paul Harvey, the station's network coo 
program, broadcast Monday through Friday from 1 :()() to 
1:15 p.m. "Almost without exception we find grocers tuned 
to our show."" sa\s Charles I). Trout, president of the com- 
pany. 'This alone is an excellent door-opener, but more 
importantly it pre-sells our products and lends tremendous 
prestige to us as distributors." With radio a kev factor in 
sales. Trout Foods' volume of business has grown 400 per- 
cent in the past years while its number of employees has 
increased five-fold, making it a leading area distributor. 



WEEU. Reading, Pa. 



Prosra 



OFFICE SUPPLIES 

SPONSOR: Roberts Office Supply Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: With many office supply firms rely- 
ing largely on direct mail, if they advertise at all. Roberts 
Office Supply Co. of Portland. Maine, has realized outstand- 
ing sales results by sponsoring classical music on WMTW- 
FM. The firm attributes its success over the fm station to 
two factors: ll A high percentage of listeners are execu- 
tives: and 2 I the station's tri-station coverage (Maine. New 
Hampshire. Vermont I. Richard Walker. Roberts' president, 
said: "WMTW-FM's coverage has given us access to new 
prospects not usually contacted by our salesmen in their 
routine calls, and has racked up for us major sales to cus- 
tomers who otherwise would never have heard of us." Re- 
cently, a new firm in the small resort village of Jackson. 
\cu Hampshire, requested a salesman and subsequentlv 
placed a substantial order, based on a commercial. Tre- 
mendous tri-state sales of this type have made the Portland 
office suppl) company's costs for advertising negligible. 
WMTW-FM, Portland. Me.-Mt. Washington, \. H. Program 



(.2 



BANK 

SPONSOR: Liberty Bank of Buffalo AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The Liberty Bank of Buffalo, New 
York, used an intensive schedule on WEBR to build traffic 
on opening day of its "Glass Bank" branch. The bank 
bought a campaign in Trafficopler Reports during evening 
rush hour. In addition, the bank ordered a special remote 
from the bank lobby the evening before the opening, the 
Hank of the Rendezvous Show, which ran from (i:"0 to 8:30 
p.m. On the basis' of past performances, the hank managei 
projected a total of 2,500 people to be expected on opening 
day. But a conservative estimate of the traffic that pas 
through was over 4,500, according to bank officials, with a 
high percentage opening new accounts. Joseph T. Frapp. 
v.p. of Libert) Bank, said: "The tremendous turnout and 
the number of new accounts was directly traceable to <>m 
promotion over WEBR. No other type of concentrated ad 
vertising could have produced these results." The BufTal* 
bank expects to continue radio advertising on the station 
Vt'KBK, Buffalo Announcements & Prog'ran 



SI'ONSOK 



3 \PRIL 1001 



From one who cared 



"I thought you would be very much moved as we 
were at CARE to read the enclosed letter* from one 
of your listeners. It certainly was a generous and 
thoughtful thing for Chris Collins to do to give up 
buying a sweater for herself and instead send $10.00 
to CARE after hearing a public service announce- 
ment over WWDC. Unfortunately, Chris Collins 
neglected to send us her address so that we could 
send her a thank-you letter on receipt. It occurred 
to me that you might want to mention this on one 
of your programs in the hope that she may want to 
communicate with us and give us her address. The 
support which WWDC gives to CARE is, indeed, 
very effective and meaningful." 

KATE ALFRIEND, Public Relations 
Washington CARE Committee 




*"This money was to have bought me a new 
sweater but, after hearing a message about CARE 
on WWDC, I decided it would do far more good 
if I sent it to you. I feel sure it will mean more to ten 
less fortunate people than it will ever mean to me." 

CHRIS COLLINS 



and many who need care 



"I want to thank you for the special service an- 
nouncements you made for the Lighthouse during 
September. They brought many inquiries, not only 
from blind persons in the District, Maryland and 
Virginia, but also from transients who did not 
know such services were also available in their 
home states. They also brought inquiries from 
the Surgeon General's Office, the USIA . . . and 
interested visitors from the Ministry of Labor in 
London and from Ghana and the Netherlands." 
ALICE HAINES, Director, Public Relations 
Columbia Lighthouse For The Blind 



. . . the station that keeps people in mind 




"Distance lends enchantment." So said the poet — 
to be precise, Thomas Campbell (1777-1844). And 
without a rhyming couplet in our body, we say 
"Amen— it sure can be true of radio." 

From the first crystal set to the tiniest new transistor, 
good radio has created a magic — an "enchantment 
of distance" — all its own. Unseen voices can become 
family friends — check our stack of fan mail. Unseen 



audiences can make themselves felt — check our 
response to public service appeals. Unseen products 
and services can make themselves SALES— check 
our list of national and local advertisers. 

It all adds up to PEOPLE, and the way you com- 
municate with them. Distance can be a distinct 
asset, if you have the magic. WWDC has it. That's 
why we're the station for you to keep in mind. 




WWDC 



Washington 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 

And in growing Jacksonville, Fla. — it's WWDC-owned WMBR 



SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 1961 



63 



SPONSOR 
WEEK 

WRAP-UP 



A TOAST to the employees in a company celebration of Tatham-Laird's 15th record year is 
made by the eight management directors of the agency (l-r): Charles Standen, vice president 
and head of contact department; George Bolas, vice president and media director; Art Tatham, 
chairman of the board; Ken Laird, president; Bob Hayes, management director, N.Y. office; Harry 
Barnhart, deputy creative director; Hal Jensen, executive art director; Jerry Birn, executive 
copy director. The company's ninth management director, Hal Frazee, is head of N.Y. office 



Advertisers 




VERY SAN FRANCISCO sour dough French bread, arrived on Madison Avenue via TWA and 
KABL, San Francisco. TWA hostess, Diana Tanger, checks over bread for distribution to N.Y. 
agencies by the services of McGavren Co. account execs (l-r): Chuck Hedstrom, Monte Lang, 
and Bob Williams. Originally, the forty-niners ate this bread made from fermented dough 




Pepsi-Cola's "Mow it's Pepsi for 
(hose who think young" theme 
got a big play in the Greenville, 
M. C. area from local bottler 

Jack !Min«ies. 

Here's what he did: 

For six weeks, he ran a teaser cam- 
paign us in<> 80 local tv spots. Then 
— for two weeks — the following 
schedule: 44 tv announcements a 
week on two local stations; 500 radio 
spots per week on five local radio 
outlets: one full newspaper color page 
insertion: and one-half page newspa- 
per insertion in each of two addition- 
al newspapers. 

As an extra fillip. Minges pro- 
claimed the theme via an airborne 
hailing banner while a public ad- 
dress system beamed down spot re- 
cordings of the new "Pepsi song" to 
the tune of Whoopee. 

Campaigns: 

• Valley Feed & Supply Co., 

Spring Valley, N. Y., is pushing its 
Poa Wild Bird Feed and Kleen kith 




:ON OF THE SOD, Shaun Murphy (born in 
Ireland), sales mgr., KTVI, St. Louis, greeted 
timebuyers in N.Y. with special shamrock 
cookies on St. Patrick's Day, which he person- 
ally delivers to Dorothy Schneider, Y&R recep. 



64 



SI'ONMIH 



3 vpril 1961 



products with spots on The Fitzger- 
alds show over WOR, New York City. 
Agency: Elmwood Advertising. Spring 
Valley, N. Y. 

• Dixie Cup, division American 
Can, has bought participations on 
ABC's Walt Disney Presents to pro- 
mote its home dispensers. Agency : 
Hicks & Greist. 

• Westinghouse's new lamp light- 
er caricature will be selling the com- 
pany's light bulbs on NBC's Westing- 
house Playhouse and a booster sched- 
ule of tv spots in major markets this 
year. 

Westinghouse Electric last week 
named four of its men to posi- 
tions in its regional apparatus ad- 
vertising and sales promotion di- 
visions. 

The men. and the posts: 

• Drayton Heard, from sales pro- 
motion manager, Northeastern region, 
to manager of apparatus advertising. 
Pittsburgh. 

• Sheldon F. Johnson, from 
manager of apparatus advertising, 
Pittsburgh, to sales promotion man- 



ager, Pacific Coast region, San Fran- 
cisco. 

• E. H. Jacobs, from representa- 
tive of apparatus advertising, Pitts- 
burgh, to sales promotion manager, 
Northeastern region. 

• R. B. Roberts, from manager 
of sales promotion, Pacific Coast re- 
gion, to apparatus advertising depart- 
ment. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Wil- 
liam L. Christensen, from market- 
ing product development division, 
Chemway Corp., to advertising pro- 
motion manager, William Pearson 
Corp. . . . W. B. Bryan, from ac- 
count executive, Foote, Cone and 
Belding. to advertising manager, 20 
Mule Team Products division, United 
States Borax & Chemical . . . George 
R. Simkowski, from advertising 
manager, to marketing manager, Web- 
cor Sales . . . Edward C. Stern, to 
Dormeyer advertising and sales pro- 
motion manager, Webcor Sales . . . 
Donald J. Dougherty, from adver- 
tising manager, Hertz American Ex- 
press International Ltd.. to director 



of advertising, Remington Rand Elec- 
tric Shaver I International) . . . 
Douglas D. Hay, from v. p. sales to 
v.p. administration, Beecham Prod- 
ucts, Inc., Clifton, N. J. . . . Donald 
F. Breaugh, from Personal Prod- 
ucts Corp., division Johnson & John- 
son, to v.p. sales, Beecham Products. 

MORE PEOPLE ON THE MOVE : 

Sanford S. Mazarin, from interna- 
tional account supervisor, J. Walter 
Thompson, to advertising and promo- 
tion manager cosmetics, Warner-Lam- 
bert International, division Warner- 
Lambert Pharmaceutical . . . Martin 
H. Molema, from assistant to man- 
ager international advertising, North- 
am-Warren (Cutex, Odorono prod- 
ucts) . 



Agencies 



K&E has bought the radio cover- 
age of the Triple Crown races 
this spring on CBS for Pabst 
Brewing. 

The events: the Kentucky Derby, 
the Preakness and the Belmont Stakes. 



INTRAVENOUS LUNCH is volunteered Jay Kerekes, sales manager 
of WEWS-TV, Cleveland, who is recovering from an emergency ap- 
pendectomy during a sales trip to New York. Donors are (l-r): Bill 
Vernon of Blair-TV, George Blinn and Sandy Gasman of the Gumbin- 
ner Agency. Nurse Margaret Davies of Leroy Hospital does the job 





LONG LOOK at new king-size posters for KNX radio, Los Angeles, is 
taken by (l-r): Bob Sutton, v.p. and gen. mgr.; Arthur Wittum, KNX 
advertising mgr.; Fred Ruegg, v.p. in chg. of CBS radio station admin. 




'SALUTE TO ITALY' was the theme on WNBC-TV, New York. To 
remind timebuyers, 500 baskets of wine, cheese, Italian bread, pack- 
aged meats, and spaghetti were distributed. Jonella Singeton, NBC 
guidette, delivers baskets to Lennen & Newell timebuyers (l-r): Bob 
Kelly, Sally Reynolds, Mike Moore, Lou Crossin, and James Alexander 



SPECTACULAR opening of 
Ringling Brothers, Barnum and 
Bailey Circus in Washington, 
D. C, was participated in by 
WMAL radio and tv. Broadcast 
stars, Pick Temple, Jackson 
Weaver, Frank Harden, Bunny 
Wneck, Jerry Strong, and Pete 
Jamerson were in opening act 
called, 'Out of this World* 



Vgeney appointments: Westing- 
house Broadcasting, i From Ket- 
clium. McLeod & Grove) and the 
\\ BC Productions, Inc., to Grey . . . 
The Maple House to Zakin, for its 
two stores, 'New York Citv and 
Scarsdale) . . . Y Dorman \ Corn- 
pan} (domestic cheeses), from Doyle 
Dane Bernbach, to Co-Ordinated 
Marketing Agency for its Dorman's 
Endeco Brand Cheeses . . . BarChris 
Construction (bowling centers and 
equipment), to Dunay, Hirsch & 
Lewis . . . American Paper Box, 
Boston, to Kay Barron. Boston, for 
its Magic Wand Paper Doll Division 
. . . Hampden Moving and Storage, 
Baltimore (North American Van 
Lines i. to Birnhaum, Brahms, 
Gerbers & \\ olff, Baltimore . . . 
Bali Brassiere Co., to Fletcher Rich- 
ards. Calkins & Hohlen . . . Midas 
Muffler, Southern California, to Tilds 
\ Cant/. L.A. . . . Chesebrough-Pond s 
Ltd., to BBD&O International, for 
its Vaseline Medicated Shampoo and 
\ aseline Hair Tonic ads in the I nited 
Kingdom. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Wil- 

Mam IL Howard, to La Roche, as 
president . . . H. H. Marshall, to 

Ogilvv. Benson \ Mather, as v.p. cop\ 
supervisor . . . William W. Mulvey, 
to McCann-Erickson as senior v.p. . . . 
Robert C. Barker, from v.p. ac- 
count supervisor. Compton. to J. Wal- 
ter Thompson as account supervisor, 
Radio Corporation of America ac- 
count . . . Norval B. Stephens, Jr., 
from marketing supervisor to account 
executive. Needham, Louis and Bror- 
h\ ... Charles J. Mowry, from as- 
sistant advertising and sale> promo- 
tion manager, residential products. 
Carrier Corp., Sv racuse, Y Y., to ad- 
vertising account executive. Erwin 
\\ase\. HuthraufT & Rvan. Philadel- 
phia . . . Richard L. Rogers, to ac- 
count executive, Knox Reeves . . . 
Muriel Franko, from account execu- 
tive. Sid DuBrofT Associates, to ac- 
count executive. Regal Advertising 
. . . Julien Field, to copv writer, 
creative department, and Bob Sal- 
lin. to broadcast supervisor. Foote. 
Cone \ Belding, L.A. . . . Francis E. 
Brennan, from art advisor. Time, to 
v.p. account director. McCann-Erick- 
son. 

They were elected v.p/s: Harry 
E. Sandford, at Doherty, Clifford. 



Steers & Shen field . . . Glenda Sulli- 
van, at Ben Sackhciin . . . John D. 
W. Barnetson, Walter K. Collins, 
II. ii <>l<l R. 1 1 nil in. in. Joseph L. 
Killeen. Jr.. Dan MacMillan, 
James J. McMahon, John J. 
O'Connell, and Mrs. Mildred 
Thomas, all at Fitzgerald Advertis- 
ing, New Orleans. 

TOTAL STATIONS ON THE AIR 
las of 1 March 1961): 

AM: 3.55t. 

FM: 839 

TV: 541 
BOUGHT/SOLD APPROVED: 

Bought: WONE and WIFE- 
FM, Dayton. Ohio, by Brush-Moore 
Newspapers, Inc., from Skyland 
Broadcasting: brokered by Blackburn 
& Company. Washington. D. C: 
price: $2 million . . . KRSI. Minne- 
apolis, by Red Owl Stores. Inc., from 
Radio Suburbia. Inc.: brokered bv 
Blackburn & Company, Washington: 
price: stock exchange amounting to 
$330,000 . . . WJMA, Orange. Va.. 
b> Archibald C. Harrison. Jr.. and 
Henrv Bovver, from Charlottesville 
Broadcasting Corp.; brokered by W. 
B. Crimes & Co.. Washington. D. C: 
price: $60,000 . . . KKJD, Pendleton. 
Ore., by Robert W. Roderick, from 
Fred Stevens and Paul Ward: bro- 
kered by Edwin Tornberg & Co., New 
York City; price: $65,000. 

Grants: Transfer of Coahoma 
Broadcasting Company. WKDL, 
Clarksdale. Miss., to Dr. Foster Mont- 
gomery, and Robert J. Mcintosh, In- 
dianapolis. Indiana. 

New On The Air: WLKW, 
Providence. R. I.. 3 April. 50.000 
watt AM, operated by Radio Rhode 
Island. Inc. Ceneral manager: Mown 
Lowe. 

Associations 

The NAB, last week, named a spe- 
cial subcommittee to recommend 
ways tv stations can get better 
representation in talent negotia- 
tions with the American Federa- 
tion of Television and Radio Ar- 
tists and the Screen Actors Guild. 

Westinghouse Broadcasting's Jo- 
seph 0. Schertler was named chair- 
man. 

The other members: William C. 



Fitts. Jr.. CBS. Y Y.: Abiah A. 
Church. Storer Broadcasting. Miami 
Beach; Charles H. Crutchfield. Jeffer- 
son Broadcasting. Charlotte. Y C. 

N \B manager of broadcast person- 
nel and economics, will serve as co- 
ordinator. 

The Broadcasters' Promotion As- 
sociation, in an effort to broaden 
its membership rosters, has 
mailed out membership bro- 
chures to some 700 radio and 
tv promotion managers and 290 
allied companies. 

A similar mailing is planned soon 
to stations and companies in Canada. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Ham- 
ilton M. Woodle, from v.p. general 
manager. WSPB, Sarasota. Fla.. to 
field representative. NAB. Washing- 
ton . . . Charles C. Bevis, Jr., from 
general manager WBIF-TV. Buffalo. 
N. Y., to assistant executive director. 
Association of Maximum Service 
Telecasters. Washington . . . Rich- 
ard Turnbull, A. A. A. A. v.p. since 
1048. appointed senior v.p. 

TV Stations 

ABC/s Hollywood stations, KABC- 
TV and KABC Radio took advai 
tage of the current rash of fasl 
ion showings and patterned tb< 
format to a clever sales presei 
tation. 

The stations put on a Show Styl 
for Spring showing to some 500 ac 
vertising executives at the Amta 
sador Hotel. 

Models in bathing suits parade 
out the stations sales-ability in foi 
segments : 

ll Place in the sun: the image 
progress; an explanation of ABC" 
growth in recognition and respect. 

2 1 Patterned for Pleasure: l\ 
story of the station's programing. 

3) Ahead of the Swim: the trend 
Inward ABC. 

4 1 Fashions of the Future: the 
shape of things to come on the sta- 
tions. 

Storer Broadcasting, in broaden- 
ing out its executive level, has 
created a new position — vice- 
president of administration — 
ami named its long-time execu- 
tive and current v.p. of radio, 
William E. Rine, to the post. 
I Please turn to page 75 i 



66 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1061 



■ ■ a 



you believe that more national spot dollars can and should be allocated to your 
market — 

you agree that your market growth-story must be told to media decision makers— 

you and other station managers in your market want to step up the national spot 
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SALES SPOTTERS can help you. This company, recently formed by a group of 
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by every media director and supervisor, in the New York area. Our intent is to 
represent a limited number of markets ... to properly sell your market ( by a 
presentation which we will prepare) to major spot advertisers and their agencies. 

No one is actively doing this for you on a regular basis. No one is currently con- 
centrating on getting more spot dollars for your market. 

Sales Spotters, through a unique plan, will present your market story to the people 
who pick the spot markets and decide the budget for each. 

Obviously, we must limit our list of markets, so the time to act is 



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after they have been allocated for your market), then let's discuss details. 

For extra spot dollars contact 



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SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 1961 



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Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

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Wha^s happening in U. S. Government 
tliat affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



Full-scale Congressional probes of the rating services appeared to have suffered 
a serious setback because of the study made for Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.) and 
his House Commerce Committee. 

Harris, himself, certainly now plans no such investigation. He has, however, left the door 
open just a little bit for a possible probe of the way in which networks use the ratings to place 
or displace programing. 

The report on the study made by a committee of statistical experts was technical enough 
to discourage any lawmaker. While it did contain some conclusions and recommendations, 
they were not of a nature to shake the structure. 

Major recommendation was for a single industry-supported agency to study methods and 
uses. There was a conclusion to the effect that ratings are often in error with respect to small 
stations and small areas, but it was acknowledged that no better efforts could be supported. 

While methods on a national scale were said to have many shortcomings, the report 
said the results are pretty accurate, and again lack of financial support was cited. 




The situation at the FCC with respect to toughening regulation continues to 
grow more threatening every day. 

With an average of 1,700 station licenses coming up for renewal each year, it has now 
been revealed that some 700 are in a "deferred" status. 

Both statements were made at political complaint hearings held this week by the Senate 
Watchdog subcommittee, and the author of both was Joseph Nelson, chief of the Renewals 
Branch, Broadcast Division. 

The development occurred a few days after KORD, Pasco, Wash., became the station with 
the dubious honor of being the first to get into trouble on purely programing 
grounds. Others have had payola, technical violations, and such things as alleged fraud as 
the moving factor in their difficulties, though programing has sometimes entered into it. 

KORD was charged with promising farm programing, locally originated programing, etc., 
and not delivering it. It was charged with greatly exceeding the number of commercials il 
had promised, and in some cases in 25-minute periods of having almost nothing but spots 
back-to-back. 

Even so, the vote was only 4-3 to hold renewal hearings. In this case, Ford was one of 
two doubtful commissioners who crossed over to vote with the Minow-Lee-Bartley lineup, 
which will be voting this way consistently. The other doubtful vote, Cross, went with the 
Hyde-Craven lineup, which will be voting consistently the other way. 

Both the outcome and the way the individual commissioners voted were significant in as- 
sessing what will happen to many of the some 700 "deferreds." 



FCC Chairman Newton Minow gave the Senate Watchdog subcommittee (actual- 
ly a subcommittee of the Senate Commerce Communications subcommittee set up to 
keep tabs on the industry during the recent campaign) a glowing picture of indus- 
try performance politically. 

He quoted President Kennedy's statement that "broadcasting's performance in the criti- 
cal election year of 1960 was a great step forward in the democratic process." He stopped 
short of asking that the 1960 temporary relaxation of equal time requirements for presi- 
dential and vice-presidential candidates be made permanent. 



SPONSOR • 3 APRIL 1961 



71 



^ 



3 APRIL 1961 

Copyright I9fil 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



72 



Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



MCA's eagerness lo jump into selling full-hour off-network re-runs, and now a 
half-hour one as well (Staccato) may signify a continued hiatus from first-run 
production. 

It's been more than a year since MCA brought out a trio of first-run syndicated shows 
(Shotgun Slade, Johnny Midnight, and Coronado 9) and still nothing new for syndication i: 
foreseen from MCA for the immediate future. 

By contrast, MCA has five off-network shows which have gone on sale in recent 
weeks, four full-hours and now Staccato, 27 half-hour episodes of which have been sold t 
WNEW-TV, New York; KTTV, Los Angeles; WTTG, Washington; WTVH, Peoria; KOVR, 
Stockton, and WTVP, Decatur. 

With its biggest regional client, Falstaff, electing to drop syndication next year, MCA has 
apparently decided that station sales of off-network re-runs are its most lucrative pos- 
sibilities in the present syndication market. 

Syndicators last week were holding their breath waiting for a chain reaction 
of network and regional sales to start itself off. 

Several were sweating out word regarding "on the fence" network program proposals. 
Others were out making an early play for big regional accounts. 
This feeling was in the air: a lull before the storm. 

It's not expected that too many of the shows which went into a second year 
production for the current season will try for a third year next season. 

Except where such shows have the insurance of continuing regional backing, the distribu- 
tors involved would rather sell the 78 episodes as re-runs to stations than build up an added 
inventory in continuing first-run station sale. 

At one time it was axiomatic that a show never went into a second year of production 
without major regional backing, but this is no longer so. Now, shows that successfully go in- 
to a second year, mostly via station sales, seem to be drawing the line on a third year, a 
new axiom replacing the old one. 

A show to watch this fall will be Father of the Bride on CBS TV. 

Based on an MGM property, the pilot was financed by General Mills (BBDO) some time 
ago. MGM-TV "will make the series and Campbell's will co-sponsor. 

The show will be watched closely for two reasons: to see how client-hacked pilots 
work out, and also to test the success of series based on movie properties. 

The production order for the show, incidentally, marks an all-time high in tv activity at 
MGM-TV. making two hours. Dr. Kildare and Cain's Hundred, in cooperation with NBC TV, 
and another hour. Asphalt Jungle, for ABC TV. 

Banks and financial services seem to be the most rapidly growing group of 
syndication sponsors at the moment, reports a Ziv-UA study. 

This type of advertiser is currently spending at the rate of &2 million a year for just the 
first-run shows of the one syndicator. 

Factors behind banking growth in syndication sponsorship are 1) the change of image 
in recent years banks have undergone from conservative, impersonal institutions to modern, 
personal ones, and 2) banking's inherently local-regional character, lending itself 
readily to syndication program sponsorship. 



srtmsoK • 3 April 1%1 







FILM-SCOPE continued 



Cartoon shows are becoming one of the best types for the international market. 

Screen Gems has reason to believe that Huckleberry Hound — the first regular half-hour 
animated tv series — may also become an international tv best-seller. Sold in 25 countries, the 
show has been dubbed already into French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, and Japanese. 

This is the most extensive dubbing ever done for a tv cartoon series. 

Following in Huckleberry Hound's footsteps in the international tv market are Quick Draw 
McGraw and The Flintstones. All of the shows are produced by Hanna-Barbera and distrib- 
uted by Screen Gems. 

Up to now action-adventure has been the most universal tv program type, easy to follow 
and not too hard to dub, especially where voice-over is prominent. But the cartoons seem 
even easier to dub; regional dialects can be used, and material can be readily re- 
written if needed. 



Not all of the network casualties of any season end up in local re-runs. 

A variety of legal and economic factors will keep many of this season's off-network shows 
in the vault, perhaps permanently. 

In a few cases rights may be owned by original sponsors who have no further interest in 
seeing the show on the air again in any way. 

In other cases re-run rights reside with a producer with no experience in re-run syndi- 
cation, who must make distribution agreements with existing syndicators. 

Still other shows, clearing the legal hurdles, stay out of re-run syndication for eco- 
nomic reasons : talent repayments and sales expenses can at times mount to $10,000 per epi- 
sode, a prohibitive re-investment. 

The best re-run shows are the same as the best network shows: programs with 
long network runs, good ratings track records and sponsor histories — and there are few of 
these. 



There's been a new interest in imported video tape shows lately. 
KHJ-TV, Los Angeles, had its highest Nielsen morning ratings with a Mexican- 
made series of soap operas video-taped in Spanish. 

Each program has 50 episodes for ten-week Monday-through-Friday telecasts. Titles are 
Mortal Sin, Shadows in White, and Maria Guadalupe. 

Programs were distributed by Teleprograms de Mexico, a subsidiary of Telesistema, 
S. A., Mexican tv center. 

The Mexican shows, locally sponsored, will be also seen shortly in other markets in the 
southwestern U. S. The shows are also distributed in Latin America. 



Although many commercials producers have eyed the cartoon program produc- 
tion field as a likely adjunct, very few have actually gone into it in recent seasons. 

The outstanding exception of the current season is Video-Craft Productions, a New York 
film commercials house, which made and sold New Adventures of Pinocchio, a series of 130 
five-minute color cartoons. 

Among the 26 stations sold are KTLA, Los Angeles; WGN-TV, Chicago; KPRC-TV, 
Houston; KLZ-TV, Denver; KRON-TV, San Francisco; WAGA-TV, Atlanta; WIIC, Pitts- 
burgh; KIRO-TV, Seattle; KRLD-TV, Dallas; CKLW-TV, Detroit; KROD-TV, El Paso; 
KARD-TV, Wichita, and WDSU-TV, New Orleans. 

Note that Video-Craft's effort is exceptional on two counts: 1) it was a tv film commer- 
cials house that expanded into cartoon program production, and 2) it undertook syndica- 
tion distribution of its own product. 

• 3 April 1961 73 










3 APRIL 1961 

Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 






BBDO brass last week paid a visit to Pittsburgh Plate Class for what might be 
described as an eleventh-hour effort to keep the $2.5-million account in the fold. 
Meantime, there's been plenty of pitching from other agencies. 



be 



NBC Acceptance says it's operating under very strict rules when it conies to 
taking merchandise from manufacturers to use as giveaways on its game shows. 

The rules, in brief: 

• The middleman submitting the stuff must have a letter of authorization from the 
manufacturer. 

• The donor can't be guaranteed the minimum wordage that will be used to describ* 
his contributed prize. 

• A flash-card picturing the merchandise will be used only when the prize itself isn'i 
exposed during the program. 

(See 20 March SPONSOR HEARS on how the "middleman" solicits agencies.) 



Speaking of unusual coincidences, there's one prevailing at the moment at Comp 
ton and JWT. 

They're both pitching all-out to snag a gasoline account. 
Compton, to make up for the loss of Mobiloil; JWT, Shell. 






Blowing the whistle on a competitor caught in a triple-spotting situation ha 
lately become a business-wooing device among a few stations in certain tv market! 

The finger-pointer usually operates through his rep, who, to help make the thing sticl 
urges a buyer to check with the other two agencies involved in the triple spot. 

In one such recent case all three agencies notified the culprit that they would not hoi 
or any bills dating back to the advent of the triple-spotting, citing the fact that the 
contracts specifically ban the practice. 

A trend that seems to be taking on momentum in the rep field : groups makin 
it mandatory that a rep accept newly-acquired properties in secondary markets 
he is to be assigned a big revenue station. 

The tie-in can prove embarrassing from two angles: 

1 ) The rep relinquishing a competitive station with which he has maintained ha 
pj and fruitful relations. 

2) The manager of a sold property finding himself forced to abandon a rep that h 
done a consistently good job for him. 

There's a difference between agencies and reps in the matter of adjusting ma ■ 
power when a source of commission goes out the door. 

An agency can lop off the account group without fear of arousing other clients, buti 
rep has no choice but to retain his full contingent of salesmen. 

These salesmen have been supplying all the stations with business, and in the event oil 
cutback, the other stations are bound to protest it's unfair to make them take 1 1 
rap in reduced manpower. 



74 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL ISt 



WRAP-UP 

(Continued from page 66) 

In his new assignment, Rine will 
be chairman of the company's profit 
sharing trust fund, and will super- 
vise the Storer owned Miami Beach 
Sun Publishing Co. as well as the 
handling of other administrative mat- 
ters. 

Storer's director of radio opera- 
tions Lionel F. Baxter has been moved 
'up to fill the vacated Rine spot. 

WABC-TV, New York City, v.p. 
and general manager Joseph 
Stamler, speaking before the 
Donnell Library Television Infor- 
mation Office class last week, 
credited tv advertising with pro- 
viding economic change and im- 
provement stimulus. 
Excerpts of his talk : 

• Advertising has increased from 
,a $5 billion business annually in 1959 

to almost $12 billion in 1960. Tele- 
vision advertising revenue has grown 
ifrom $58 million in 1949 to more 
than $1.5 billion in 1960. 

• While the pros and cons of ad- 
vertising as a marketing tool has 
stirred many a heated controversy 

lover the years, there are few econo- 
mists today who would refute its 
dynamic power in moving goods and 
sen ices. 

• Advertisers discovered long ago 
3 that television advertising like all ad- 
vertising is to make the story known 
>to the greatest number of prospects 

possible at the least cost in the most 
persuasive manner. 

Thisa 'n' data: WFAA-AM-FM- 

TV, Dallas, marked the opening of 
! its new communications center with 
la contest for agencies and their cli- 
.ents . . . TvAR's newest audience di- 
mension survey discloses that pet 
• owners watch more tv than non-pet 
owning families. The figures: 19% 
more for dog owners and 16% more 
for families owning pets of any kind. 

New quarters : KMSP-TV, Minne 
I apolis, adding additional office space 
:to its present site 15 June. 

'Kudos: KWTV, Oklahoma City, 
named first place winner in the $5,000 
to $10,000 category, Oklahoma Ad- 
vertising Federation's annual direct 
mail leaders campaign. 



PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Shaun 
F. Murphy, from national sales man- 
ager to v.p. and general sales man- 
ager, KTVI, St. Louis . . . Philip D. 

Marella, from sales staff to local 
sales manager, WIIC, Pittsburgh . . . 
James Stevenson, from publicist to 
national sales service representative, 
WBBM-TV, Chicago . . . Gene Reilly, 
from sales manager, Fruit Dispatch 
Co., to sales coordinator, WFGA-TV, 
Jacksonville. Fla. . . . Robert Strei- 
der, from account executive, KCFM, 
St. Louis, to account executive, KPLR- 



TV that city . . . Joseph R. Briscoe, 

Jr., from account executive and an- 
nouncer, KWRE, Warrenton, Mis- 
souri, to account executive, KPLR- 
TV, St. Louis . . . Art Seabolt, from 
producer-director to promotion man- 
ager, WTVD, Durham-Raleigh, N. C. 
. . . Richard J. Wright, from Pa- 
cific National Advertising, Spokane, 
Wash., to publicity and promotion 
director, KGW-TV, Portland, Ore. 

MORE PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 
Robert Nashick, from advertising 



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and promotion director to manager 
advertising, promotion and publicity, 
and Janet Byers, from advertising 
and publicity manager. KFWB, L.A., 
to associate director publicity, both 
KLTA, Hollywood . . . Doug Har- 
ris, from assistant promotion direc- 
tor, WLOS-TV, Asheville, N. C. to 
promotion director. WRDW-TV, Au- 
gusta. Ga. . . . Paul E. Yoakum, 
from producer-director to operations 
director. WBNS-TV, Columbus, Ohio 
. . . Theodore H. Walworth. Jr., 
from station manager and director of 
sales, WRCV-TV, Philadelphia, to 
general manager. WNBC-AM-FM and 
WNBC-TX. V-w York City. 

How to best explain and sell the 
$20 billion Negro market will be 
surveyed later this week (10-11 
April) by the hoard of the re- 
cently organized Negro Radio As- 
sociation in meetings at the 
Roosevelt Hotel New York City. 
The group includes 58 Negro-ap- 
peal radio stations under the chair- 
manship of Francis N. Fitzgerald, 
WGIV, Charlotte, N. C, who said his 
seven man board will discuss: 

1) Implementation of the group's 
original organizational blueprint. 

2) Possible research tactics which 
can deliver more and authentic Ne- 
gro market information for agencies 
and advisors. 

3) Suggested setting up of a New 
York office. 

Ideas at work : 

• WHK, Cleveland, played up the 
official coming of spring by giving 
away a $100 prize to the first woman 
who presented herself at the studio 
door after the 3:30 p.m. beginning of 
spring time, wearing a bathing suit 
and carrying a rose clutched between 
her teeth. 

• KALL, Salt Lake City, invited 
ite advertisers to a luncheon and cock- 
tail partv and gave away rifles, ra- 
dios and appliances as door prizes, 
and a grand prize of a new car. The 
reason for the Operation Sponsor 
tribute: "for making it possible for 
management to pay employees." 

• WQTE, Detroit, for the past 
two weeks, has been airing comments 
from local automobile dealers dealing 
with the subject — Why this is the best 



time to buy your new car. Some 48 
dealers in all, at the rate of four-per- 
day are being heard during a fifteen 
minute segment of the station's morn- 
ing show — Chuck Dougherty t'ro- 
gram . 

Sports sales: The Brown Derby 
Restaurant chain. Akron, Ohio (Stalk- 
er Agency) has bought sponsorship 
of the racing results broadcasts ovei 
W< I E, Akron ... Oak Park Fed 
eral Savings and Loan Associatior 
(Connor Associates, Aurora, 111.) ; 
G. Heileman Brewing (McCann-Erick 
son, Chicago) ; and Magikist Serv> 
ices (D. A. Greenwood, Cicero. 111.) 
to sponsor Chicago Cubs schedule 
over WGN. Chicago . . . WGN, Chi- 
cago, Lead-Off Man sponsored by On 
Cor Frozen Food Products (Wright, 
Campbell & Suitt), Bauer Buick and 
Mathieu Building (both Perry Badg- 
ett) ; Scoreboard sponsored 1>\ G. 
Heileman (McCann-Erickson) . . . 
Atlantic Refining Company (Ayer) 
has bought one-half sponsorship of 
New York Yankee baseball games 
over W-TEN, Albany and WKTVj 
Utica. 

Kudos: KBOX, Dallas, recipient of 
1961 National Headliners Club Award 
for Journalistic Achievement, for con- 
sistently outstanding coverage of lo- 
cal news events on radio . . . WFBC, 
Greenville, S. C, distributive educa- 
tion program feature, D. E. Spotlight. 
won first place in the state-wide com- 
petition . . . WIP, Philadelphia, re- 
cipient of special "tribute from the 
grateful City of Philadelphia" on the 
occasion of the station's 39th anni- 
versary, 16 March . . . KQV, Pitts- 
burgh, general manager John D. 
Gibbs. named member advisory com- 
mittee National Foundation. 

Happy anniversary : KFBB, Great 

Falls, Montana, program Farmers 
Noon Hour on the air since 1922. pre- 
senting 12.000 consecutive broadcast 

7 April. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE : Waj J 

D. Costner, from commercial man- 
ager, KYSN, Colorado Springs, to 
commercial manager, k IT \. Pueblo, 
Colo. . . . Althea Line, from media 
director. Coleman-Parr. to account 
executive. KDAY, Los Angeles . . . 
George S. Milroy, from account 
executive to sales manager. WDTM, 



76 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



. 



Detroit . . . Gregory Reeser, from 
sales manager, WLAV, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich., to mid-west sales represen- 
tative, Community Clubs Awards, 
Westport, Conn. . . . Robert J. Mc- 
intosh, elected president and gen- 
eral manager, WKDL, Clarksdale, 
Miss. . . . Dale Morgan, to program 
director, KHOW, Denver Colo. . . . 
Dave Abrahmson, to account exec, 
WABC, New York City . . . Reb 
Foster, KICN, Denver air person- 
ality to KYW, Cleveland. 

The 12 fm stations which com- 
prise the San Francisco Bay Area 
FM Broadcasters joined forces 
last month to turn the spotlight 
on fm programing by running 
an FM Month promotion. 

The stations - - KAFE, KBAY, 
KBCO, KEAR, KJAZ, KPEN, 
KPFA, KPGM, KRON, KRPM, 
KSFR, KWME — spent something 
like $50,000 in a multi-media drive 
which included tv spots, hi-fi dealer 
tie-ins and over 3,000 spots on fm sta- 
tions during the month-long promo- 
.tion. 

The theme: Everything sounds bet- 
ter on fm radio. 

Fm programing: WFBM-FM, In 

dianapolis, scheduling This Is Steve 
Allen twice daily — 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. 
Monday through Friday . . . KFAB, 
Omaha, Neb., inaugurated a six-hour 
nightly program of stereophonic 
broadcasting, from 6 p.m. to mid- 
night. 

<&> 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Gene 
Hull, from sales staff, WICC, Bridge- 
port, Conn., to account executive, 
WJZZ-FM. Fairfield, Conn. 

Networks 



Net tv sales: General Foods (Benton 
p Bowles) to sponsor CBS-TV's new 
animated cartoon series, Alvin and 
the Chipmunks, next fall . . . Gillette 
(Maxon) has bought co-sponsorship 
.of ABC-TVs 1960-61 Fight of the 
{Peek . . . Eastman Chemical Products 
has bought weekly participations in 
CBS-TV's The Millionaire (6 April- 
27 September) and / Love Lucy (10 
April-27 September) . . . Block Drug 



to sponsor The Groucho Show begin- 
ning this week . . . Union Central Life 
Insurance to sponsor NBC-TV's two 
Project 20 series (biographies of 
Grant and Lee). 

Net tv renewal: Prudential (Reach, 
McClinton & Company, New York 
City) of CBS-TV's The Twentieth 
Century, 52 weeks beginning next 
fall. 

New affiliates: KCIJ, Shreveport, 
La. and WLEU, Erie, Pa. with CBS 
Radio. 

Kudos: NBC executive v.p. for news 
William R. McAndrew recipient of 
Villanova University's St. Augustine 
Award for "distinction in the field of 
communications journalism." 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE : Sigrid 
H. Pederson, former J. Walter 
Thompson attorney, to legal depart- 
ment, ABC . . . Charles H. Barris, 

from daytime programing depart- 
ment to manager, tv daytime pro- 
graming, ABC TV . . . Bill Eames, 
from reporter-assignment editor, CBS 
News, to newly created post, assistant 



to the television assignment editor 
CBS News . . . Thomas K. Fisher, 
appointed v.p. and general counsel, 
CBS . . . Jack Dolth, from assistant 
director sports, to sports director, 
CBS TV . . . Jack Purves, to sports 
sales coordinator, and John Hamil- 
ton to director business affairs, CBS 
TV. 

The networks will launch their 
own men into space — in the Cape 
Canaveral area — to cover the 
launching and hoped-for return 
of the country's first astronaut. 

Mutual reports that the seven net- 
works will send out news crews to 
various vantage points and that 
all are on the alert for Project Mer- 
cury. 

Actual launching date is top secret. 

Elaborate broadcast plans have 
been made in Washington for full 
coverage. 



The Katz Agency will take over 
the representation of WAVE-TV 
and WAVE Radio from NBC 
Spot sales as of 4 June. 



America's new economic 
strength lies in the South. 

A proven leader 
is the Jackson 
TV market area." 



Past President, American 
Muncipal Association 

ALLEN C. 
THOMPSON 

Mayor, Jackson 




WLBT 



Hollingbery 



Serving the Jackson, Miss., Television Market 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



77 



WRGB 

puts your 
MESSAGE 

WHERE 

THE SALE 

BEGINS 

The number 1 voice and picture 
in Northeastern New York and 



Western .New England. 



CHANNEL 
A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 
ALBANY. SCHENECTADY. TROY 



992-11 



6 



Rooms e 
Suites 

^*T. . to please the most 
discerning at the BELMONT 

Overlooking Lake Michigan and 
Belmont Yacht Harbor. 12 min- 
utes from the loop— direct busses 
at the door. Spacious parking. New 
Banquet and Meeting rooms accom- 
modate up to 400 persons. 
Charming, new Mansion House 
Dining Room and unique Cocktail 
Room-The Dam Site. 

700 Rooms & Suites »=3>5Wk. V^ 
TRANSIENT 
& PERMANENT 

Full Hotel Services 
Singles . from $9 
Doubles, .from $13 

r. 1. PETITM AIRE 
General Manager 

BITTERSWEET 8-2100 
3172 NORTH SHERIDAN ROAD 




Katz at a later date will assume the 
representation of \\ FIE-TV, which is 
owned l>\ the same management, from 
the Paul Raymer Co. 

\\ \\ I Radio's been with NBC 
Spot Sales since L933 and WAVE-TV, 
since 1948, while \\ TIE-TV came to 
Raj mei in L953. 

Adam Young, speaking before 
the annual Tele-Broadcasters 
meeting in New York City last 
week, said a radio station's pros- 
perity was dependent, not on the 
nation's economy, but on these 
three factors: 

1. The station's product — its pro- 
graming — and how salable it is. 

2. What the station does with the 
product — how well will it he sold. 

3. Image — will the station do the 
myriad other things that will give 
it acceptance. 

Rep appointments: KTHT, Hous- 
ton. Texas, and WTAC, Flint. Mich., 
to Robert E. Eastman. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Mi- 
chael A. Wiener, from ABC TV 
sales development, to assistant direc- 
tor sales promotion. H-R . . . Ben 
Margolis, from business manager, 
CBS Television Spot Sales, to TvAR 
as administrative assistant to the gen- 
eral manager . . . Stuart I. Mackie, 
from sales staff, Avery-Knodel. Chi- 
cago, to manager Detroit office . . . 
William Carpenter, from ZIV-TV, 
New York City, to account executive, 
H-R . . . George R. Swearingen, 
Jr., from account executive, CBS 
Television Spot Sales. Atlanta, to 
manager that office. 

Film 

American advertisers are invest- 
ing more heavily in American tv 
shows seen in other countries. 

Central American Tv Network, for 
example, a five station network sub- 
sidiary of ABC in El Salvador, Guate- 
mala, Nicaragua. Honduras, and 
Costa Rica, reports a flurry of U. S. 
orders there. 

They are: 

Corn Products (Foreign Advertis- 
ing and Service) purchased Circus 
Boy. 



Scott Paper (JWT) and S. C. John- 
-"ii will sponsor Star Performance. A 
third sponsor. Super-Det, is a Central 
American detergent 

Pan American World Airways 
i JWT) will sponsor Markham. 

Other American sponsors already 
on CATVN are Goodyear, Parker, 
\ irk. and Nestle. 

Sales: Seven Arts' Films of the 50's 
to KWWL-TV, Waterloo; KOLO-TV, 
Reno: WHEN-TV, Syracuse; WINK- 
TV. Ft. Myers; WISH-TV. Indianapo- 
lis; KOCO-TV. Oklahoma City; 
KLRJ-TV. Las Vegas, and KGHL- 
TV, Billings . . . Seven Arts special 
features to WISH-TV. Indianapolis; 
WHEN-TV. Syracuse, and CKLW-TV, 
\\ indsor. 






Commercials: Van Praag Pro- 
ductions to make industrial film for 
food products on New York restau- 
rants in connection with coming NeJ 
York World's Fair . . . Internation- 
al Video Tape of Beverly Hills in 
association with Unit Ten Video 
Tape Productions to make Miles 
product commercials (Wade) . . . 
Playhouse Pictures commercial 
for Ford dealers (JWT) awarded 
New York Art Directors Club medal 
for best tv spot of the year . . . Jack 
Denove Productions completed sec- 
ond series of commercials for Camp- 
bell's barbecue beans (NL&Ri. 

Promotion: Trans-Lux reports un 
usual success of Felix the Cat promo-j 
tions by WNEW-TV, New York; 
WRGB.' Schenectady; \\ 'HEN-TV. 
Syracuse: WFAA-TV. Dallas; WFRV 
TV. Green Bay; WBZ-TV, Bostoj 
and WROC-TV, Rochester. 

Ratings: KSD-TV, St. Louis, scortj 
22.0 ARB to lead time period witl 
Seven Arts Warner's Films of the 50V 
in Gold Award Theatre, sponsored by 
Beauty rama . . . NTA's Third Man ii 
Januarv-Februarv ARB reports scorec 
29.5 on WOW-TV. Omaha; 21.5 oi 
WTVJ. Miami, and 23.5 in New \ 01* 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Car 

Miller added to ITC's Western sale 
division . . . Dick Jacobs promote* 
to v.p. of completion services a 
Filinex. New York . . . Norton T 

Gretzler appointed t\ commercial cc 
ordinator for On Film. Princeton. N.J 



78 



SPONSOR 



• 3 APRIL 196 



' 



Speakers at AFA's 57th conven- 
tion scheduled for Washington's 
Sheraton-Park Hotel 27-31 May, 
will cover many of the problems 
faced by advertising as well as 
practical and current ad trends. 
Two of the speakers: General Al- 
fred M. Gruenther, president, Ameri- 
can Red Cross, and former NATO 
chief; and Dr. Neil H. Borden, Har- 
vard advertising professor. 
Other trade dates : 
13-14 April, 12th Atlanta Advertis- 
ing Institute. Dinkier Plaza Hotel, At- 
lanta, Ga. 

3 May, Station Representatives As- 
sociation fourth annual Silver Nail 
Timebuyer of the Year award, Starlite 
Roof, Waldorf, New York City. 
5 May, Eleventh Annual Radio-Tele- 
vision Guild Conference and banquet, 
San Francisco State College, San 
Francisco, Calif. 

1-5-6 May, Western States Advertis- 
ing Agencies Association, 11th annual 
conference, Shelter Island Inn, San 
Diego, Calif. 

7-10 May, National Association of 
Broadcasters 39th annual convention, 
Washington, Shoreham and Sheraton 
Park hotels. ^ 



CANADIAN TV 

(Continued from page 51) 

Canadian talent and geared particu- 
larly to appeal to the Canadian con- 
sumer. 



What do syndicated programs 
cost? A film show shot in Holly- 
wood for the use of the U. S. net- 
works normally recovers its produc- 
tion cost and earns a profit out of 
the price the U. S. sponsors pay. 
This means that foreign sales — after 
selling and distribution costs abroad 
are paid for — are "gravy" to the 
show's owner. This, in turn, means 
that the price you pay for Canadian 
rights to a film show merely reflects 
supply and demand on one hand and 
your agency's negotiating ability on 
the other. 

If five sponsors want the Canadian 
rights to Gunsmoke, for example, the 
one willing to pay the highest price 
is likely to get the show. In such a 
situation, he'd pay approximately 
$3,500 to $4,000 an episode for na- 
tional rights. 

On the other hand, and more real- 
istically, the distributor is likely to 
have available a long list of good 
U. S. shows but not nearly enough 
sponsors to go around. In this case 
you are most likely to get the show 
you want for $2,000 to $2,500 an 
episode. Moreover, if you buy two 
or more shows from the same distrib- 
utor, you have a good chance of get- 
ting them at less than $2,000 each. 

This scale of pricing simply re- 
flects the fact that Canada is a buy- 
er's market. With only one station in 
most markets, a maximum of two in 
major markets, and a quota system 
that holds down United States pro- 
graming to 45 9^ of the station's total 
schedule, Canada simply cannot ab- 
sorb the massive output of film from 



United States syndicators and net- 
works. Network prices, for the aver- 
age show produced by the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corp. of one-half hour 
in length, will be upwards of $5,000 
an episode to the sponsor. 

What about time availabilities on 
network affiliates? Time periods on 
free-enterprise stations affiliated with 
the network can be bought outside 
of network option time, which at 
night is approximately 8 to 11:15 
p.m. in most of Canada and 9 to 
12:15 p.m. in the Atlantic provinces. 
These free-enterprise stations cover 
the balance of Canada's television 
homes. They are eager to accept se- 
lective programing since these shows 
are usually their top audience build- 
er. 

In the case of CBC owned and op- 
erated stations, a large proportion of 
time not earmarked for network pro- 
grams is devoted to news and public 
affairs shows which are not available 
for sponsorship. A few early-evening 
and late-night periods can be bought 
for selective programing, when avail- 
able. 

What is the ratings situation? Na- 
tional ratings are not relevant be- 
cause of: (1) The language prob- 
lem. Because nearly 30% of Cana- 
da's population is French-speaking, 
"national" ratings on either English 
or French shows are relatively mean- 
ingless; and (2) the enormous mar- 
ket-by-market rating differential. A 
large portion of Canada's tv homes 
are located in "extreme" markets 
(i.e., single-channel markets or multi- 
channel border markets). ^ 



T-S-T FOR TV TESTERS 

rempted to try Spot TV for your product... but not sure? T-S-T (Tele- 
vision Spot Test) is the low-coin way for qualified advertisers to test this 
?reat medium without going national. Before and after show surveys how 
/our product goes; how your copy line works. Another unique service of... 

TELEVISION ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 




SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



79 



■1 



WRGB 

puts your 
MESSAGE 

WHERE 

THE SALE 
BEGINS 



The Dumber I voice and picture 
in Northeastern New York and 
Western New England. 992-11 

WRGBp 

CHANNEL 
A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 
ALBANY*SCHENECTADY»TROY 




From lunch to late, late dinner 

Open daily, Sundays, too! 

Reservations: EL 5-9185 or PL 5-6843 

The Bistro for private parties 
Personal direction: Nino 






1 



Tv and radio II 
NEWSMAKERS 




rep firm office. Since 
Radio Sales office Det 



Walter A. Schwartz lias been named 
tional radio sales manager for the Westii 
house Broadcasting Co. He replaces Perr 
Bascom who. last month, was appointed 
general manager of WBC's Cleveland radio 
outlet KYW. Schwartz comes to his new 
post with a strong and varied background. 
He has been a performer, announcer, sales- 
man. sales manager and head of a national 
1959 he has been in charge of WBC's \ni 
ioit. He was WWJ, Detroit sales managed 




Joseph P. Dowling has been named sales 
promotion manager of Storer's recently 
formed rep firm, Storer Television Sales, 
Inc. Dowling joins Storer after five years 
with CBS Television Stations Division. His 
most recent assignment was sales promotion 
manager. CBS Television Spot Sales. Prior 
to that he was sales promotion manager of 
WHCT, Hartford. Conn. Dowling's broad- 
casting career began in the research department at ABC. He 
moved on to Headley Reed. N.Y.C., and WTOP-TV, Washington. l ( 

Blair Television Associates, in expand- 
ing its sales executive level, has elevated 
two of its sales staffers to sales-manage- 
ment positions. The duo: James Theiss 
l left ) to sales manager of Eastern stations, 
and Lloyd Heaney (below right I to sales 
manager, Western stations. Both men hi inu 
to their new posts a broad background in 
spot tv sales experience. Theiss, a graduate 
of Seton Hall University where he majored in economics and busi- 
ness administration, joined. Blair five years a»o. Prior to that time 
he spent several years in the media department of Benton & Bow le- 
as timebuyer on the General Foods and 
Procter & Gamble accounts. Heaney's ex- 
perience in broadcasting includes more 
than ten years with the Chicago Tribune 
and station WGN-TV. Four years ago, he 
resigned from the WGN sales development 
division to join Blair Television \ssoeiates 
in Chicago. He was transferred to Nev 
York City when the Blair Television As- 
sociates' sales staff was enlarged last year. Heaney's formal educatioi 
was sained at DePaul University and the University of Chicago 





80 



SPONSOR 



3 APRIL 1% 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



The practice of stations running movie films in competition with a network 
idaptation of the same story is firmly defended by Burt Lambert, vice-presi- 
lent and director of sales for WOR-TV, New York. (This independent was 
z pioneer in the practice of repeating the same movie throughout the week 
da its Million Dollar Movie spread.) Lambert argues that the practice is 
w different than one network programing a western opposite another net- 
vork's western. He also defends the practice as a competitive necessity. 




Independent tv stations must program films competitively 



■% few months ago, an incident took place that pin- 
ointed the role of the independent tv station in its pro- 
raming of films. WOR-TV presented Ernest Heming- 
ay's "The Killers." At the same time a network an- 
ounced its live version of the same story. 

Following the parallel programing a great many reports 
ere carried in the newspapers and trade journals reflect- 
ig the irritation of the network. These same objections 
ere voiced when we presented Al Jolson in "The Jazz 
inger," paralleling again a network adaptation of the 
,1m story. 

, The facts that lie behind the matter are these: WOR-TV 
b a film station has made many multi-million dollar pur- 
bases of feature films. Other independent stations 
iroughout the country have done likewise. The networks 
n the other hand have, in many cases, purchased the film 
lights to some of these film properties with intent to offer 
ive versions. Obviously, there will be times, perhaps in- 
creasingly more numerous, when feature film showcases on 
idependents will schedule films as the networks present 
leir interpretation of the same story. 

We will not argue at length the question of which ver- 
on is better. As is well known, the facilities, studios and 
roduction techniques of Hollywood are not easily dupli- 
ated in television studios. 

The independent station's point of view is rather simple. 
'e exist in a highly competitive market where success is 
leasured by pleasing the audience with the best of product 

ost of the time. Our product is film; our investment in 
ich product is a heavy one. We might here call attention 

the fact that it is, perhaps, within the power of the net- 



ONSOR 



3 APRIL 1961 



works to seek and present original material rather than 
aim for "adaptations." That, however, may well be beside 
the point. 

When the clamor arose there was the rather sad sug- 
gestion that we "shoudna' dunnit." They may as well 
clamor that the networks begin to observe each other's 
competitive programing and desist from showing a western 
on network A, when network B is going all out with horse 
operas, that news not compete with news, and that specials 
and spectaculars be programed with due concern for what 
the other part of the forest plans. 

We do not program with intent to parallel. But we face 
the same problem that any other independent station faces 
throughout the country. We move in an intense world 
where we are concerned with putting our best product 
forward. Our investment in such product makes it manda- 
tory that we program our major film properties to reach 
the widest audience at all times. As a result we offer Mil- 
lion Dollar Movie 16 times a week, at specific hours re- 
gardless of what others are programing on their outlets. 

When we depart from films, we do not buy adaptations, 
but like so many other independents in this and other mar- 
kets, we program live material using station personalities, 
or through special documentaries, reports of significance 
to the community we serve. 

Perhaps the best comment that could be made on our 
film programing is a final reference to network plans to 
use feature films for their programing. Certainly it is bet- 
ter for Goliath to acknowledge the Davids of independent 
television rather than to protest. 

In this case perhaps they doth protest too much. ^ 






» 



TTf^ir i 



81 



MMH 



SPONSOR 



Return to confidence 

For the past three weeks, sponsor editors in their daily 
checks with radio/tv agencies and advertisers have heen pick- 
ing up an increasing number of encouraging signs about the 
state ot the business. 

Advertising budgets, once locked in a winter atmosphere 
of doubt and discontent, are beginning to open up with the 
approach of spring. 

New plans, new appropriations, new campaigns are shap- 
ing up in scores of agency offices. And it looks as if spot, 
both tv and radio, will be leading the advertising parade in a 
healthy return to confidence. 

This we believe is as it should be. 

The dynamics of the air media, and the flexibility of 
radio/tv spot make them ideally suited to spearhead a new 
vigorous anti-recession drive. 

The broadcasting industry, more than any other, can pro- 
vide the emotional and inspirational lift which the American 
economy needs to start opening up those New Frontiers. 

In this connection, we want to make special mention of the 
Advertising Council's new nation-wide campaign "Confidence 
in a Growing America." 

The Council's project co-ordinator, Robert M. Gray of 
Esso Standard Oil, and his agency task forces, have put to- 
gether an impressive promotional package, including many 
fine materials for use by radio and tv stations and networks. 

We urge all-out industry support for the "Confidence in a 
Growing America" drive. 

Plan now for Radio Month 

And speaking of drives, we take our hats off too to the 
NAB's Public Relations Service for its complete and beau- 
tifully planned kit on National Radio Month. 

These kits are already in station hands, and it is not too 
early to start making plans for using them next month. 

They provide radio men with a comprehensive set of tools 
for promoting radio's image, tools that should be used and 
used aggressively by everyone who believes in the power and 
importance of the medium. Keynote of National Radio 
Month is "Radio — the best sound around." Radio, itself, can 
make this claim come true. ^ 



82 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Medium medium: Comic Gary 
Morton opens his night club act with 
"I'm working here because I'm too 
expensive for Jack Paar and too 
cheap for Ed Sullivan." 

Rare pair: Jack Douglas, working 
the 1320 show, said that Reader's 
Digest, "a trade paper in Levittown," 
has an article this month on the 
latest birth control method. "Its 
separate rooms — preferably one in 
Scuttle and one in Buffalo." 

Pour attitude: Over at \. Y.'s Fleur 
de Lis (ABC's Hurley's), someone 
said — "Some people have no respect 
for age unless it's bottled." 

Utilitarian: An evening newspaper 
carried the following tv program list- 
ing — "Late movie (1:15 a.m.. chan- 
nel 21 : Desire Me (1947—90 min.). 
Greer Garson, Robert Mitchum. A 
man not only deserts his friend but 
steals the man's wife to boot." For 
kicks, we figure. 

Promises: Gary Cooper was talking 
to 11 Guide about the television cow- 
boy stars — "These people would be 
laughed right out of any authentic 
Western town, say between 1850 and 
1890. If those people shot them- 
selves up as much as they do on some 
of these tv shows, they never u <>id<i 
hare got the West populated." 

Can do: A convivial timebuver noted 
at P. J. O'Hara's in N. Y. that the 
new Deputx Mayor had started in thi 
sanitation department and suggested. 
"That's really coming up from thi 
rank." 

Good evening, men: Washingtor 
correspondent Bill Shannon * \. V 
Post) quotes an Administration offi 
cial this way: "(My) most uncanic 
experience is to attend committer 
meetings with Edward R. Murroi 
the U. S. Information administrate! 
The chairman calls upon him ad 
there he is. just like on television 
chain-smoking and talking in th 
deep voice. I almost expect him t 
saw 'This is the nen s! 

Shock treatment: Approach the 9 
with caution, men. when tuning-] 
CBS TV's Gunslinger show. It seen 
that co-star John Pickard is the gu 
who posed for those WW II Army p 
cruiting posters and with pointt 
finger said. "He Want You!" 



i 



sI'ONMH! 



3 \I'KIL 19( 



:J 



The Nation's leading advertisers (like Colgate) are sold on SPOT . . . The only 
market-by-market mass medium with no waste circulation . . . The medium 
that lets you match your advertising effort to your sales potential . . . Bess 
Myerson sells the housewife at carefully selected times and . . . COLGATE'S 
AJAX continues to bubble up increased sales . . . Your H-R man will sell you 
now on SPOT... 



(& 



Television, Inc. 
Representatives 





^&$d> 



No gambling when you buy WBRZ in Baton Rouge . . . Baton 
Rouge as a market ranks just below Ft. Worth - Dallas, Houston 
and New Orleans. It's the 4th largest market in the Gulf South-an 
area made up of the states of Louisiana, Texas and Mississippi. 
The Baton Rouge market, with a population of 1,561,000 and 
retail sales of $1,285,000,000.00, is served completely by 
television station WBRZ. Baton Rouge is truly too BIG a market 
to be overlooked on any list. Call your Hollingbery man. 



NBC 



ABC 



WBRZ^w2 



lO APR! 
40< a copy* $8 a 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS U 






ER CARRY MORE CASH THAN YOU CAN AFFORD TO SPEND 




'961 
HBCGENti 

/ never carry 
more than 
20 in cash 



Says HARRY TURNER 
Houston Pharmacist 



?? 




\C-TV is too powerful for me. Whenever I see 
i liing advertised on that station, I want to run 
lout and huy it . . . So, to prevent that from 
'?ning. I just don't carry more than $20 in 




COURTESY OF THE 
AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY" 



PRC-TV • CHANNEL 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 

EDWARD PETRY & CO. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 




GOOD NEWS! 

SPOT IS 

ON THE MOVE! 

Record year indicated 
by current buys. '61 
forecast: tv will go 
up 7% ; radio rise, 5% 

Page 35 



What's behind 
trend to web 
cartoon series 

Page 38 






So you think 
that you buy 
saturation ? 

Page 40 



Local one-shots 
put clients 
in tv limelight 

Page 44 



9 




all measurements prove that 
Channel 10 is the BIG One... 



* 



N.S.I. AND A.R.B. METROPOLITAN AUDIENCE SURVEYS . . . NOVEMBER 1960 



HAS THE BIGGEST 
OVERALL SHARE 
OF AUDIENCE I 

CARRIES 16 OF THE 
TOP 20 FAVORITE 
TEL E VISION SHOWS! 



It's always gratifying when independent surveys or 
the Rochester Metropolitan Area see affirmatively— 
"aye to aye"— as regards the dominant position of 
Channel 10. Not only do we carry HO r 'e of the Top 
Twenty favorite Rochester shows— not only do we 
deliver the largest over-all Rochester viewer-audience 
—hut, from key executives to propmen. from facilities 
to promotion— uv have what it takes to make the spon- 
sor happy!— We also have some mighty attractive a\ ail- 
abilities. Write, phone or wire for complete details. 



4f*ftJH Mk WkM Ml K7I 



BASIC CBS 

ROCH 



AFFILIATE ABC 

, N.Y. 



WHEC-TV 



EVERETT M.KINNEY INC. 



WVET-TV 



THE BOLLING CO. INC. 



ROUND UP YOUR RUPEES! In India, rupees go a long way towards 
the downpayment on a sacred cow, the purchase of a new 
spring turban or a trip to the Taj Mahal. But in Baltimore, an/ 
advertiser gets the best run for his rupees on WBAL-RADIO, 
the DOMINANT force of this densely populated province. 
Here's why: There are no "untouchables" in the land 
WBAL-RADIO . . . WBAL-RADIO covers the entire metropolita 
area, plus 37 counties in Maryland and 4 adjacent states 
WBAL-RADIO gets you results, without rope tricks, 
providing more unduplicated coverage in this market 
than any other native station. WBAL-RADIO knows 
how to charm listeners of every age, every interest, 
with a distinctive format of Full Range Programming 
and Music for Mature Minds. . . If you want your 
advertising to purchase more sales, round up your 
rupees and reap results on WBAL-RADIO, Baltimore 

WBAL-RADIO BALTIMORE'&larylandsonly 50,000 watt station 
Associated with WBAL FM &TV/ Nationally represented by(8)Daren F. McGavren Co., inc 




SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



> I ol. IS, !\o. 75 



lO APRIL 1961 



CHANNEL 9 

WTVM 

COLUMBUS, GA. 



• A Great New Market! 

82% unduplicated audience on the 
only primary ABC station between 
Atlanta and the Gulf! 

• Top ABC Programs! 

Shows like Maverick, Cheyenne, The 
Real McCoys, Sunset Strip, Hong 
Kong, and The Untouchables. 

• The Best of NBC 

Programs like Wagon Train, The 
Price is Right, Huntley-Brinkley 
News and Bonanza . . . plus top 
syndicated programs. 



CHANNEL 9 



[JQQQ 



COLUMBUS, GA. 




Call the man trom 
YOUNC TVI 

Ask about 

availabilities on 

WTVC CH. 9 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The #1 night-time 

station in 

Chattanooga! 






SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RAOIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES: 

Spot starts to sizzle again 
35 Another record yeai i- expected for i\ and radio spot. Heavj Marcu 
buying indicates mone) held hack during slowdown was intended for spot 

Cartoons grow up: mature to web prime time 
38 -\H three networks will have cartoon series next fall. Spon-nrrd li\ 
clients looking l"i adult audience, they're scheduled in earl) evening 

So you think you buy saturation? 
40 Illinois fund producer, Brooks Foods, buys 100-700 spots a week in one 
station per market through S. E. Zubrow. five-second plugs predominate 

"Bedside Network" aids veterans 
42 Till) admen and broadcasters provide unique rehabilitation help for the 
more than 125,000 patients in 115 Veterans Administration hospitals 

Local one-shots put tv clients in limelight 
44 BBDO brings them in for Schaefer, other clients, at $5,000-70,000 for 
one market. Hour-long St, Patrick shovi beats oul two nets in New York 

Who's Raggedy Ann? Tv tells all 

46 '"'"' marketer solves brand awareness problem with spot tv schedule and 
heavy merchandising at point of -ah. Wanness doubles in one month 

NEWS: Newsmaker of the Week 6, Sponsor-Scope 21, Sponsor- Week 27, 
Sponsor- Week Wrap-Up 62, Washington Week 65, Film-Scope 66, Sponsoi 
Hears 68, Tv and Radio Newsmakers 77 

DEPARTMENTS: Commercial Commentary 10, 49th and Madi- 
son 16, Reps al Work 18, Tv Basics 47, Sponsor Asks 54, Spot Buys 57, Seller's 
Viewpoint 78. Sponsor Speaks 80, Ten-Second Spots 80 



Officers: V or man R. Glenn, editor and publisher; Bernard Piatt, ex- 
ecutive vice president; Arnold A/pert, vice president and assistant publisher; 
Elaine Couper Glenn, secretary-treasurer. 

Editorial: John E. McMillin, executive editor; Ben Bodec, news editor; 
Alfred J. Jaffe, managing editor; Jane Pinkerton, senior editor; Given Smart, 
midwest editor; Heyward Ehrlich, film editor; Jack Lindrup, Ben Seff, Walter 
/■'. Scanlon, Michael G. Silver, Ruth Schlanger, Diane Schwartz, associate edi- 
tors; Joe Csida, columnist; Maury Kurtz, art editor; Frances Giustra, produc 
lion editor: Elaine Johnson, editorial research. 

Advertising: Willard Dougherty, eastern manager; Herbert M. Martin. 
Jr.. southern manager; Paul Blair, midwest manager; George G. Dietrich, .h.. 
western manager; Jo Ganci, Shirley S. Allison, Barbara Parkinson, sales serv- 
ice production. 

Circulation: Seymour Webef, manager; l.\nn Cane, reader service; Kath- 
i \n O'Gonnell. 

Administrative: N. /'. Massimino, assistant to publisher; Fred Levine, 
accounting manager; George Becker, Michael Crocco, Syd Gottman, Wilkt 
Rich, Irene Sulzbach, Geraldine Daych. 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



© 1961 SPONSOR Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial. Circulation, and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St., New York 17, MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 
N Michigan Av. (11). Superior 7-9863. Birmingham Office: 3617 8th Av. So., FAirfax 
2-6528 Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Blvd. (28), Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 
3110 Elm Av Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada $9 a year. Other 
countries $11 a year. Single copies 40<. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd class 
postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



4 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



How WHO -radio services 

aid food advertisers in 

Americas 14th LARGEST 

radio market! 

Feature merchandising services offered 
in high -traffic food stores! 



\A/UO -Radio's Feature Merchandising Services 
if I \\J provide unmatched in-store attention for 
the products of qualifying advertisers. 

These outstanding services are performed in high- 
volume chain and independent supermarkets in every 
city and town of over 5,000 population, in 28 of 
Iowa's most heavily-populated counties. These coun- 
ties account for 46% of all retail food sales in Iowa! 

Experienced staff members make a minimum of 
480 store calls for your products over any 13-week 
period. They work with grocers to assure that your 



products get maximum facings, better shelf positions, 
50 one-week displays of suitable products, and 24- 
days of Bargain Bar participation. 

50,000-watt WHO reaches 865,350 homes in 96 of 
Iowa's 99 counties plus a number of counties in neigh- 
boring states. Only 13 other stations in America offer 
you more audience or more buying power than WHO ! 

WHO-Radio is equipped and staffed to blend your 
advertising with professional, "big market" program- 
ming. Talk to your PGW Colonel soon about WHO 
Radio and America's 14th Largest Radio Market! 

Sources: NCS No. 2 and Pulse, March, I960. 



WHO 

for Iowa PLUS! 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 



NBC Affiliate 

WHO Radio is part of Central Broadcasting Company, which also owns and operates WHO-TV, Des Moines; WOC and WOC-TV, Davenport 



*. 



Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

Robert H. Harter, Sales Manager 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., Representatives 



: SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 1961 



5 



[WDEIiVMS 
IDE NfliQNS 

NUMBER ONE 

RftiL MAI^T 

Odessa, Texas is now the na- 
tion's richest retail market with 

retail sales of $588 7.00 per 
household.* This is one of the 
big rich Texas size markets 

served by the 
TRIGG VAUGHN stations. 

PvJ also delivers El Paso, 
the nation's 46th city, and 34% 
of New Mexico. The Boiling 
Company Man has the full 
story 

KOSA®TV 

First in the 1st Market** 

KROD®TV 

First in El Paso** 

•Sales Mgmt. Survey of 

Buying Power 1961 

•*ARB Nov. '60, NSI Dec. '60 

BUY ® 
to sell West Texans . . 
Get 34% of New Mexico to boot 




3 QUALITY STATIONS 
QUALITY MARKETS, 



/1 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
THE 60LLING COMPANY. INC. 



Jack C. Vaughn, Chairman of the Board 

Cecil L. Trigg, President 

George C. Collie. Nat. Sales Mgr. 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Final lines in the organisational blueprint of a new (ill-broad- 
cast industry organization are being drawn this tveek by man- 
agement of the newly incorporated Better Broadcast Bureau. 
Headed by Clifford J. Barborka, Jr.. who resigned a fort- 
night ago as v.p. for John Blair & Co., the group moves 
into full-scale action 1 June ivith a key personnel line-up. 

The newsmaker: Cliff Barborka has a reputation as a 
whirlwind in radio sales who likes best of all to meet new and in- 
triguing "challenges." Innovator in creative sales, programing and 
production for radio with Blair, he's now converting his talents in 
these areas to a package service for subscribers at both the national 
and the local level. 

Better Broadcast Bureau, Inc., will combine his talents with those 
of several key advertising and/or broadcast pros in a partnership 
association in which each will per- 
form a highly specialized role. 
Among the principals detailing the 
BBB blueprint: a marketing su- 
pervisor for a major agency, offi- 
cers in a successful production 
company and a radio station ex- 
ecutive. 

The new company's function, 
says Barborka: "To offer to sub- 
scribers creative selling as well as 
programing and production serv- 
ices." 

But, "more than this, we will 
assume an industry posture on all 
broadcast problems." 

A composite of these services has been Barborkas forte at Blair, 
where in May 1959 he organized the Creative and Marketing Serv- 
ices division. Radio stations clients and prospects serviced by the rep i 
were advised on creative commercials, jingles a well as on the spe- , 
cifics of media buying. Production of commercials with original, 
music and lyrics is expected to be a mainstay service to agencies. 

Barborka has been with the Blair organization nine of his 11 years 
in the broadcast business, starting in the Chicago office as a radioi 
account executive in 1952. Before then he was a salesman for NBC 
Radio Spot Sales for two years following a similar two-year Mint 
with a sales consultant firm. 

He was named radio sales manager in Chicago in 1955 and two 
years later became a vice president of the company. His selling 
track record in Chicago, during which he is credited with developing 
much business new to spot radio with his creative tactics, moved 
him into the new post in New York and to concentrate on sale of the 
Blair Group Plan. ^ 




(Clifford Barborka, Jr. 



. 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 




CAPITAL TYPES #fi 

CLOCK 
WATCHER 

Fascinated by slow 
movement: cows grazing, 
goldfish and English drawing room 
comedies. Conscientiously 
reads labels on cereal boxes. 
Accident prone; once had 
ceiling fall on him. 
Quick only in turning to 
WTOP Radio, the station 
important to people 
in the Greater 
Washington area. 

WTOP 
RADIO 

Washington. D. C. 

Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 

Operated by 

THE WASHINGTON POST BROADCAST DIVISION 

WTOP RADIO Washington. D. C. 
WTOP-TV Channel 9. Washington, D. C. 
WJXT Channel 4. Jacksonville. Florida 





Who's laughing now? 

ABC's national audience— and more 
than any other network audience.* 
If the audience doesn't howl, the sponsor 
will. Hence our broad grin, as we report the 
situation comedy situation according to 
the National Nielsen, Jan. thru March*: ABC, 
as the chart happily shows, leads in average 
audience. What you're getting, in the way 
of smiling homes, is 656,600 more of 'em 
on ABC-TV than on Net Y... 3,283,000 
more than on Net Z. And for a last ha!, get 
this: 3 new situation comedies appear in 
Nielsen's top IS. Two of them are ABC's.* 

ABC Television Network 



* Source: National Nielsen TV Reports Average Audience, all evening situation comedies, 10weeksending March 5,1961. jNational Nielsen, MarchI,1961TV Report. 




COVER 
FLORIDA 



WSUN 



¥ 



LARGEST 
MARKET 

and 

29 Counties 

with 1 station 



Tampa-St. Petersburg is Flori- 
da's second largest market, 
with a metro population of 
772,453*! But that's not all! 
WSUN is the only station on 
Florida's West coast covering 
the entire 29 county area with 
1,420,007* residents. 

ADD TO THIS WSUN's 
GREAT ADULT AUDIENCE 
(97.2%)** ... the greatest 
percentage of adult listeners. 
This means ADULT BUYERS 
throughout the entire 24 hour 
broadcast day! 

REACH ALL OF FLORIDA'S 
2nd LARGEST MARKET ON 
THE ADULT STATION! 



620 KC 



TAMPA- ST. PETERSBURG 



Natl. Rep: VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL 
S.E. Rep: JAMES S. AYERS 
•1960 Census ••Pulse 6/60 



10 





by John E. McMillin 

Commercial 
commentary 

Read Rosser and be real 

\r\| week Alfred A. Knopf is publishing Ros- 
ser Reeves' Reality in Advertising, and I suggest 
that you rush out and l>u\ a copy. 

The 50-year old hoard chairman of Ted Bates. 
Inc.. has put together what is unquestionably 
one of the most important and significant books 
ever written about advertising. 

He has packed into 150 crisply paced pages, 
36 LI). -length chapters, more meat) facts, more challenging idea-, 
more hedrock fundamentals than I've ever seen in one place before. 

And I don't believe that anyone can pretend to expert knowledge of 
modern advertising until he has read, studied, and thorough!) di- 
gested what Reeves has to say. 

Reality in Advertising has had. of course, a lot of pre-publication 
publicity. Only a few weeks ago it was disclosed that officials of 
Mobil Oil. Inc.. were so impressed with an advance cop) of the book 
that the\ had switched their account from Compton to Bates. 

Since then the Reeves effort has received some fragmentary, often 
hostile reviews, in the advertising columns, and in the trade press. 

It has been attacked as a "glorification of the Hard Sell." as 
"nothing but a long sales pitch for Ted Bates." and as having been 
written "without modesty." 

All of which, I think, misses the point. 1 have been as sharply 
critical as anyone of certain Bates practices. And. as you will see, 
1 still think the agency has some things to grow up to. 

But this cannot obscure the fact that Reality in Advertising is a 
highly important book, and that Reeves, unlike most agenc) heads, 
has voiced a strong, courageous, distinctive advertising philosophy. 

Advertising as an intellectual challenge 

What Reeves recognizes land what too few insiders and almost no 
outsiders understand) is that advertising provides one of the most 
exciting intellectual challenges to be found in an) industry. 

Ours is a business of huge, murk) intangibles, and too often 
these are approached by admen with huge, mindless emotionalism-. 

Reeves, a chess player with an international reputation, has relied 
on clear logic and icv intellect to bring order out of advertising's 
chaos. And he has constructed a philosophic system of advertising 
principles which would do credit to an Aristotle or Aquinas. 

Not all the principles are new. Most intelligent admen, for instance, 
have long stressed the need for some sort of "central salespoint a- 
a focus for all campaign-. 

But what is new is the way Reeves has welded together a com- 
plete cosmos of advertising beliefs, a coherent, logical philosophy 
that is backed by the experience, research and successful case his- 
tories of a fast-growing $130 million agency. 
i /'lease turn to page 12) 



SPOVmh; 



10 APRIL 1961 



Woman's 

Wonderland 





0:00 A. M. 

EK DAYS 



Sprightly as springtime and just as welcome 

is this solid hour of personal 

service to the women of Detroit and 

Southeastern Michigan. 

"Consult Dr. Brothers" features the famous 

psychologist and her highly-prized counsel on 

problems of heart and home. 

"Ed Alkn Time" points the way to easy figure 

control and more zestful living through simple, 

living-room exercises. Handsome, clean-cut 

Ed Allen is a great local favorite. 

"Gateway to Glamour" spotlights beautiful 
Eleanor Schano — an exciting authority on 

face and fashions. 



Here, indeed, is a woman's wonderland — sixty 

marvelous minutes for selling everything she needs 

for herself, her family, her home. Call now for 

availabilities — either your PGW Colonel or your 

WWJ-TV local sales representative. 



Detroit, Channel 4 • NBC Television Network 

WWJ^TV 








NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 

Associate AM-FM Station WWJ 
Owned and Operated by The Detroit News 



SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 1961 



11 



What they see on 

WJAC-TV 




THEY BUY! 

m 




Statistics may be a pretty dry sub- 
ject, but they do show that more 
people watch WJAC-TV in the 
Johnstown-Altoona market than 
any other station. (The statistics 
are those of both Nielsen and ARB.) 
It's more important, however, to 
know that WJAC-TV turns those 
statistics into sales for dozens of 
happy advertisers. 
Whatever you have to sell, you'll 
sell it faster, and in greater quan- 
tities, to the purchasing people who 
watch WJAC-TV! 

For Complete Details, Contact: 

HARRINGTON, RIGHTER 
AND PARSONS, INC. 

New York Boston Chicago Detroit 
Atlonto Los Angeles Son froncrsco 




- 



Commercial commentary (Com. from p. 10) 



\s to the principles themselves, you'll have to read, study and 
think about Reality in tdvertising in order to understand them. 
Let me suggest, though, thai you paj particular attention to: 

1) The copy penetration-brand usage method Bates employs in 
measuring advertising effectiveness. 

2) The famous Bates U.S.P. (Unique Selling Proposition) and 
especially the waj Reeves defines it. It is far more than j n— t a 
catch) set of initials. 

3) Freudian research. His comments on the unreliability of such 
"hidden persuader" hokum are most refreshing. 

4) Video vampires — the visual effects in tv commercials which 
deplete or destroy selling effectiveness. 

5) Tfie dispersion theory in the use of tv spots and win Reeves 
places it above the arguments for frequency. 

Such solid subjects make Reality in Advertising an immensely 
valuable trade tool. By all means read it and read it thoroughly. 

Hobnailed boots in the boudoir 

Having said that, however, I must bring up some unpleasantries. 
\\ lt\ lias Bates, more than any other big agency, been so often in 
trouble with the FTC (for Colgate, Anacin. Life cigarettes, etc.)? 

Win is Bates copy so frequently criticized? Despite Reeves' 
clear logical, intellectual brilliance, is there a flaw in the approach'.'' 

I think there is. I've thought so for a long time. 

Back in the early 1940s when Ted Bates broke awa\ from Benton 
& Bowles to start his own agency, one of his first campaigns was 
a magazine series for Palmolive soap. 

I can remember Neil McElroy, then P&G ad manager, now P&G 
board chairman, coming into m\ office at Compton and askiim wheth- 
er we should change our Ivory soap strategy. 

Mac, obviously, was both fascinated and a little frightened by the 
Palmolive ads. Ted's techniques, even in those days, showed the 
unmistakable Bates stamp. 

He had taken beautiful four color photographs of loveb gals and 
underneath had spread ugly, black, shrieking headlines that prom- 
ised fast. fast, fast relief from acne and skin blemishes. 

The total effect was that of hobnailed boots in a silken, scentea 
boudoir startling, loud, sinister, and somewhat sadistic. 

You'll find this same strange strain of sadism in a good deal of 
Bates copy ( Anacin's hammer and sparks spots and Colgate's now- 
banned "Invisible shield" commercials are examples of it i . 

It is almost as if the Bates copywriters, having settled on a I .S.P.. 
said, ''Now we gotta slug the s.o.b's." 

Actually, it is a kind of Prussian arrogance, and like the Prussians] 
who are alwa\s startled to discover that, despite their logical meth- 
ods, people resent their overbearing crudeness (and plot to destroj 
them). I'm not sure that Bates understands its own attitudes. 

But this I do know. It is possible to follow Bates' sound adver- 
tising principles, without accepting the Bates maimers. 

William Esty, for instance, has done a brilliant job of stayin 
with solid cop) themes for Winston and Ballentine, without feeliruj 
am compulsion to kick their customers in the head. 

And I hope to see the day when Bates, instead of behaving like ; 
brilliant bigh-IQ adolescent who thinks he must be rude and Irucu 
lent, employs the Reeves principles with maturity and heart. 



12 



SI'ONSOl! 



10 APRIL 196 1 



Says Jack Harris: 

"When you buy feature films of this high quality, you can lead from strength in your 
programming. We have already used some of these Warner films as sponsored 

iem as Saturday night 
participating shows in prime time." 





course, as 




Warner's Films of the 50's... 
Money makers of the 60's 





SEVEN ARTS 

ASSOCIATED 

CORP. 



NEW YORK: 270 Park Avenue • YUkon 61717 
CHICAGO: 8922-D- La Crosse, Skokie, III • OR 4-5105 
DALLAS: 5641 Charlestown Drive • ADams 9-2855 
BEVERLY HILLS: 232 Reeves Drive • GRanite 6-1564 



For list of TV stations programming Warner's Films of 
the 50's see Page One SRDS (Spot TV Rates and Data). 



JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and General Manager 
KPRC-TV, Houston, Texas 




In Chicago 




14 



SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 196 



... McCormick Place, magnificent new lakefront exposition center, 
has an exhibition area equal to 6 football fields; 23 private meet- 
ing rooms; a theater with the largest seating capacity of any in 
Chicago. McCormick Place was completed this year in time to host 
the famed auto show, which set new attendance records. 




In Chicago 

WGN 

TELEVISION 



Better programming through 
dedicated community service 




For the eleventh year, WGN Television 
brought Chicagoland exclusive coverage of 
the auto show — and in color. 




WGN IS CHICAGO 

Quality • Integrity • Responsibility • Performance 



SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 1961 



15 



49th and 
Madison 



Strictly educational 

I was, to saj the least, a bit con- 
cerned I" see tlic paragraphs <>n the 
Gasoline Tax Education Committee 
program as reported in <27 March) 

SPONSOR. 

First of all. the budget figure you 

used was \\a\ nil: it reads as though 
spot radio is getting a $] million 
budget for the third phase of thi^ 
program. 

Secondly, the Gasoline Tax Educa- 
tion Committee program is not fight- 
ing "State taxes." This is strictly an 
educational campaign which, al- 
though discussing all gasoline taxes. 
distinctly refers to the Federal gaso- 
line tax. for this is where the last 
gasoline tax increase occurred — at 
the Federal level. 

Thirdh. this is not an "all-media" 



campaign. There is no television. 
Stefan F. Blaschke 
executive secretin \ 
Gasoline Tax Education Comm. 
V. ). C. 

Readable research 

I just wanted to let you know how 
appreciative we are for the fine job 
done on our daytime viewer atten- 
tiveness study, "NBC's new answer 
to an old ad question," in the 27 
March sponsor. 

I know how difficult it is to devel- 
op an interesting, readable story 
from the cold facts contained in a 
research document, but ) ou have 
clone it. 

Everybody loves to leap in with 
complaints when thev spot some- 
thing thev don't like, so I think it's 



onl\ right that we let you know when 
m e re pli ased, too, 

M. S. Ruke] ser, Jr. 

manager, business & 

trade publicity 

Sationai Broadcasting Co. 

V. ) .( . 

Gratified 

I was verj pleased with the waj that 
sponsor dealt with Johnson's Wax in 

ili.- two articles, beginning 20 Febraj 
ary, "Johnson's Wax: the radio 
years. Ilii~ was nicelj done and 
we are all most gratified. 

Douglas L. Smith 

advertising and merchan- 
dising director 

S. C. Johnson c\." Son. Inc. 

Racine, Wis. 



The) were elected: Vrthur J. 

Bellaire. and l'liili|» C. Carting, to 

i ot directors, BBDO . . . 
Theodore s - Watson, Jr.. .i direc- 
tor, Charles \\ . 1 1<>> t . . . Hm.,inl 
K. Melntyre, executive v.p, 



Hi 



derson, < !reen\ ille. S I 



Moved East 

The above item was clipped from the 

13 March issue of sponsor and was 




Revive your tired winter TV viewers 



with a fresh new springtime shot... 



G ha mpion shi i 



*■ 






Keep your ratings up with a change of pace and a show that really SELLS. 
Fill your winter TV slots now with a fresh new program of proven summertime 
ratings* . . . CHAMPIONSHIP BOWLING. Everybody knows, that this is 
the time of the year when sports out-rate all other TV. But, here's a surprise 
... did you know that CHAMPIONSHIP BOWLING, even in the summertime, 
out-rates or runs a hot second to Major League Baseball in cities all over the 
country? Now we're telling everyone that CHAMPIONSHIP BOWLING } 



Q- 



quite interesting in view of the fact 
that hoth underlined are originally 
out of Sioux City and lived within a 
block of each other. 

Lennon Kelly 

manager 

KTR1 

Sioux City, la. 

Salute 

Before another busy day passes I 
want you to know how pleased Mr. 
McCormick, our president, and our 
entire sales staff were with the fine 
piece you did for our Auto Salute in 
sponsor, 20 March. They liked it so 
much that they asked me to order 
500 reprints. 

Phyllis R. Doherty 

dir., advertising and publicity 

WNAC 

Boston, Mass. 

Attention getter 

Mr. Brown, of BBD&O, referred in 
your letters' column, 13 March, to 
the 13 February article in SPONSOR 
regarding WLW stars. His letter 
caught m\ attention. I, too, am a 
former Ohioan but have changed to 
another state just across the border. 
Believe he had reference to Harry 



Snodgrass as the pianist from the 
prison remote. Wasn't it Missouri 
though, instead of Ohio State Prison? 
Nice to hear the names of Thies 
and Cherniavsky again. George 
Troup was the trombonist with Thies 
who made the "Sometimes I'm Hap- 
py" theme famous. 

H. I). Longsworth 

manager of sales 

WOWO, 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 

For the record 

The 28 March sponsor-week lists 
the Art Directors Awards. May we 
correct you? The production com- 
pany which produced the Bufferin 
commercial for which Steve Frank- 
furt of Young & Rubicam won a 
Gold Medal was On Film, Inc. 

Morton Schaps 

television sales director 

On Film, Inc. 

Princeton, N. J. 

'Shut-In Matinee' 

The special boxed item "New wrin- 
kle: movies on radio." in the lower 
right hand corner, page 25, 20 March 
sponsor brings back memories. 
Perhaps the correct title of item 



should be . . . HISTORY REPEATS 
ITSELF . . . MOVIES ON RADIO. 

In the late 20s {about 33 years 
ago) we, at KFJB, Marshalltown, 
Iowa, had a direct line to one of the 
theaters where we originated a daily 
organ show. We also made a direct 
connection to the Vitaphone equip- 
ment of the theater and presented the 
entire opening day matinee presenta- 
tion of news, comedy, travelogue, 
and feature picture as a "Shut-In 
Matinee." Three changes per week 
gave us a regular three-time per week 
schedule. 

Gene P. Loffler 

general manager 

WTAP 

Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Accurate reporting 

My thanks again for your kindness 
in doing the story about Ideal Toy 
Corporation in 20 March "Sponsor- 
Week." You did a thorough and re- 
liable job of reporting the facts and 
statistics accurately. 

Melvin Helitzer 
director of advertising 
and public relations 
Ideal Toy Corporation 
New York, N. Y. 






*Typical summer ratings Sat. 
and Sun. afternoon periods. 

Cincinnati 12.7 

Grand Rapids - 
Kalamazoo 7.4 

Harrisburg 13.0 

Indianapolis 7.6 

Portland, Ore 9.2 

San Antonio 11.5 

Seattle - 
Tacoma 16.5 

Tulsa 11.4 

Other Nielsen and ARB ratings on request. 



the NO. 1 BUY in sports TV 

the highest rated syndicated 
low in TV history 

atures all the nation's bowlin 

ND SELLS ONE WHALE OF A 
F SPONSORS' GOODS! 



write, wire or phone 



75 East Wacker Drive, Chicago 1, Illinois 
Phone: FRanklin 2-439S 



One station, KOIN-TV, carries 

the strongest signal to people 

in Portland, Oregon and 33 

prosperous surrounding 

counties. That's important. 

But even more important is the 

enthusiastic reception this 

signal receives from people 

who depend on KOIN-TV's 

high standards of programming. 

That's the most people 

in this powerful purchasing 

market. Check the latest 

Nielsen for proof*. 

tow 

persuades 




e 



in 

Portland 




iff Highest ratings and widest cover- 
age ... 7 of every 10 homes in 
Portland and 33 surrounding counties. 
KOIN-TV — Channel 6, Portland, Oregon. 

One of America's Great Influence Sta- 
tions. Represented Nationally by CBS-TV 
Spot Sales. 

18 



Reps at work 




John R. Wright of Peters, Griffin, Woodward, New York, call 
attention to the fact that, "Over the past few \ears the spot specij 
has become an increasingl) important factor of our industry. Yoia 

remember how WPIX's "The Secret Life Of \dolph Hitler" lit ui 
the Arbitron board and hit a 49.7 average rating . . . one of th 
highest in New York's tv history 
. . . delivering half of the markel s 
5,000,000 t\ homes. Though space 
does not permit a representative 
rundown of the spot special, sta- 
tions in markets of all sizes have 
been, and will continue, to design 
excellent programing of this sort. 
These features are the normal out- 
growth of local programing and 
the professional production staffs 
that stations have developed. Be- 
cause each station has a feel for 
viewer tastes and habits in its market, each special can be tailored ti 
the local audience. In addition to delivering a large audience, to 
alert buyer and his client will realize that the spot special lend 
prestige to both the product and the company image. Furthermore 
the merchandising, promotional and publicity opportunities ar 
immense, affording unbeatable total impact for the advertisn 

Fred Lyons, director. NBC Spot Radio Sales. New York, points »u 
that "while the number one target for a radio rep must be th 
budget that's immediately available, the rep isn'l worth his weigl 
in old avail sheets who doesn't allot considerable time to getting ■ 
customers into the medium. Radio's advantages require constat 

repetition. For instance, lliei 
probabl) isn't an ad man left \\1 
hasn't noticed that an awful lot 
moving vans have been loading 
the city and unloading in the s 
urbs. This mass migration i 
vital marketing factor for all 
vertisers of consumer produc 
high priced or low. The food ma 
ufacturer suddenly finds that o\ 
half his potential is outside the I 
limits. The auto manufactu 
knows that half the new car sa 
are made in the suburbs and the better part of "second car sa 
are made there, too. It's only one of radio's trump cards, but 
must keep playing on the fact that our medium covers the whole m 
ket, cit\ and outlying counties — while the metropolitan newspap 
have failed to keep pace with suburbia's growth." 

SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 1 





The mistress of all 
she surveys. A 
gracious hostess 
waiting for her 
guests to arrive. 
The interesting 
and the interested 
will both enjoy 
the company 
of a "Metropolitan 
personality." 

METROPOLITAN 
BROADCASTING 

W5 East 67th Street. Xeir York 21.K.Y. 



TELEVISION STATIONS 
WNEWTV New York, N.Y. 
WTTG Washington.D. C. 
KOVR Sacramento- 
Stockton , California 
WTVH Peoria, Illinois 
WTVP Decatur, Illinois 

RADIO STATIONS 
WNEW New York, N.Y. 
WHK Cleveland, Ohio 
WIP Philadelphia, Pa. 

A DIVISION OF METROMEDIA, INC. 
other divisions are: 
Foster it: Kleiser 
Worldwide Broadcastina 



VVGA li-TV serves the public interest 





(<ir(t\i((, 



7(luncti, •fficadinp 

\!J(arriMurq. 




, (cOiniliu 



(hamlmilurq, / ^"/ ' 



'W'rhjhtMille, " 



/ 'UcAtmm.Her 

."'■ • k p :-. DSEICK ."■'.. 



X / 



•MONTGOMERY 



^» 







THE GREAT CENTENNIAL 

Footnotes to the Civil War in the Channel 
8 Area Every Monday Morning. Each 
program in this fascinating historical series 
features a separate community, as many 
cities and towns in the Channel 8 area were 
affected by the Civil War. Well-known 
examples: Battle of Gettysburg, burning of 
Chambersburg, Confederate occupation of 
York. This series is just one phase of 
this station's many activities dedicated to 
inspire and enlighten the viewers it serves. 




Lancaster, Pa. • NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 



Representative: The MEEKER Company, Inc. 

New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 




20 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL H 



Interpretation and commentary 
on most significant tv /radio 
and marketing news of the week 



SPONSOR -SCOPE 



10 APRIL 1961 

Copyright IMI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



• The tv networks can look for P&G's daytime pattern and philosophy to take 
some sharp turns during the coming season. 

Immersed in the further backing away from daytime in favor of nighttime expansion 
are a flock of factors. Among them : 

• As P&G keeps adding to its list of products, more and more of them are of a nature that 
have all-family appeal — and for all-family appeal nighttime's a natural. 

• Household cleansers and victual brands still constitute a colossal percentage of P&G's 
sales gross, but the toilet soaps, deodorants and hair products in the P&G stable have 
been making important headway on the share level and these call for more and more all- 
family advertising exposure; that is to say, a greater balance toward nighttime. 

• P&G is still perplexed by the character of the daytime tv audience — to just what extent 
daytime network tv is being viewed by the potential buyers of its products and whether it fits 
in with the sales pattern of its other-than-household cleanser products. For example: there 
are now 29 million homes with working wives. 

• In recent years P&G has been frustrated by the fact that it hasn't been able to get new 
soap operas solidly on the rails and its media master minds are wondering whether the 
time isn't far off when its judgment will dictate departure from its own serials and 
wholesale participation in scatter plans. The old P&G serials keep rolling, but their turnover 
of audience seem to get lower from year to year. 

• The P&G soapers not long ago got ll's and 12's, but what with three-network competi- 
tive leveling out program ratings, they're lucky now to get an 8 or a 9. 

What all this inventory -taking and soul-searching simmers down to: P&G's heart and mil- 
lions of its dollars will still remain in daytime, but the balance will continue to build for 
nighttime. 



Toni accounted for the big action of the week in spot tv : it's the annual spring 
buy of sixteen weeks, via C. E. Frank, North, Wade and FC&B. 

The campaign, involving around 50 markets and based on 100 rating points a week, 
takes in all products, including Paper Mate. Toni's newest product, Cascade hair coloring, 
is not scheduled, at least for the first nine weeks of this campaign. 

The week's conspicuous buy out of New York was P&G's Tide (B&B). 



Lucky Strike (BBDO) will be cutting loose soon with a substantial spot tv cam- 
paign that will run for 20 weeks, with all market categories included. 

Another product using a heap of markets but for only four weeks: Chun King out of 
BBDO Minneapolis. The concentration is on minutes. 



Watch for this revolution in the petroleum industry (and a consequent shake- 
up in agency affiliations) : a mounting emphasis on the image of the product. 

Agency experts in the petrol field note that this quest by the individual companies for 
distinct personalities or identity symbols for their brands goes hand-in-hand with an- 
other industry urge: to sell the consumer on far more use of his car. 

The expanded use campaign, when it breaks via the American Petroleum Institute ( JWT) 
will focus on the theme of getting more fun out of life by going places and calling atten- 
tion to the great super-highways that have been made available lately. 



• 10 APRIL 1961 



21 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 






Ford should give JWT its answer within the next two weeks to an uncommon 
ly complex plan for air media participation during the 1961-62 season. 

Key factors in the plan: (1) concentrating the bulk of the expenditure in the last 1961 
quarter and the first 1962 quarter; (2) spreading the tv network buys over multiple 
shows instead of confining the investment to a couple of series to insure maximum flexi 

hility in matching tv obligations to the seasonal sales pattern. 

Spot buying will be subject to the same philosophy. Commitments, in effect, will be on 
a 13-week basis. 

7-Up (JWT Chicago) is getting away from routine network tv participations, 
like alternate weeks and minutes, and adopting a special pattern for the 1961-62 
season. 

It will have a minimum of 26 shows made on the continent in the Friday 7:30-8:3C 
p.m. slot — circuses, miscellaneous theatrical events, etc. 

A major objective: getting a different audience from the kind it's been getting the 
past two years and having something that it can merchandise heavily among its distribu- 
tors and dealers. 

The pop maker will also use heavy flights in spot, as has been customary. 

National Carbon (Esty) has wrapped up a little earlier than usual its Septem- 
ber-December tv network needs for its anti-freeze products. 

Over the period there'll be about 60 commercial minutes spread over spot carriers 
and sports on NBC TV and ABC TV. 

The competitive division at DuPont (BBDO), which last season also bought heavily in 
spot carriers, is working on its tv network requirements, too. 

Both anti-freeze makers are perennial users of spot radio on a saturation scale. 

Evidently ABC TV won't let CBS TV remain happy over the claim to be the 
happiest of the networks. 

Acting on that recent CBS TV trade ad captioned, "Ha! Ha! Ha!," ABC last week com- 
piled the following table to show that its situation comedies garnered a bigger average 
audience this season than did CBS' situation comedies: 



NETWORK 


TOTAL SITUATION COMEDIES 


AVERAGE RATING 


ABC TV 


8 


22.0 


CBS TV 


12 


21.6 


NBC TV 


7 


15.4 






*January-February 1961 NTI. 

Note : ABC TV also claims it came out with a better score on the situation comedies 
introduced this season, striking a batting average of .500 (two out of four) as compared 
to .400 (two out of five) for CBS TV and .167 (one out of six) for NBC TV. 

There's a definite trend among midwest advertisers to combining tv and radio 
spot. 

Wrigley about a year ago took to this pattern on a big scale and this spring that type 
of mixing has been adopted by Pure Oil (Burnett) for its Firebird brand, by Amocc 
(D'Arcy), Continental Casualty (Hartman) and Red Heart dog food (Shaw). 

Another pattern getting play in that sector this spring: shorter schedules but the use of 
several stations in a market to get maximum penetration. 

Don't be surprised if CBS Radio comes up with a sponsor for the New York 
Philharmonic concerts broadcast during the 1961-62 season. 

One of the top-rung agencies has a client with a prestige-public image problem that's 
seriously interested. Package price for 28 broadcasts: $840,000. 



22 



SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 1961 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Looks like CBS TV will inherit for the 1961-62 season that $1.5-million worth 
of General Mills business now on NBC TV. 

The major reason: there'll be about $2 million in billings riding on Father of the Bride 
alone and that makes an ample base for building to a maximum discount. 



With R. J. Reynolds standing pat in its refusal to accept the new 10:30 p.m. 
Wednesday time, the chances are that I've Got a Secret will be sold for the fall by 
CBS TV on a minute basis — the unsold portion, if any, going co-op. 

Meantime Reynolds via Bates has committed itself for a total of nine minutes a week 
on the other two networks. The participations: NBC: Wagon Train, 1^2 minutes; Mitch 
Miller, l 1 /^ minutes; Saturday Night Movies, 2 minutes. ABC TV: 77 Sunset Strip, 1 minute; 
Flintstones, l 1 /*? minutes; Lawman, 1% minutes. 

Reynolds is still in the market for three or four minutes a week, and, despite the 
peeve over the I've Got a Secret time switch, Reynolds will probably wind up filling in the 
difference at CBS TV. 



CBS TV appears bent on selling the Ed Sullivan show on the basis of half- 
hour segments when the current contracts have expired. 

In terms of time, at least, it will mean 20% more income for the network. 

ABC TV salesmen last week were collecting agency reactions to the prospect of 
the network scheduling re-runs of hour tv films after 11:15 p.m. this fall. 

Price quoted: a range of $6,000 to $8,000 per minute commercial, with the exact cost 
depending on the number of times used. Discounts apply to 26, 52, 104, and 250 times. 

The Jack Paar Show now sells at $12,000 a minute, before discounts. ABC TV says its 
own stations in Paar time get a 27% share of audience. 




CBS TV will have but a slight edge over ABC TV come the fall in the make- 
'em-laugh sweepstakes. As the schedule shapes up now CBS will have 14 situation comedies 
in prime time as against 12 on ABC TV. 

For CBS it's no increase in that category, whereas for ABC it's a jump from 8 to 

12. In other words, ABC has moved up several notches in getting over the concept of bal- 
anced programing. Westerns on ABC took another slash, going from six to four. 
Here's a comparison of network types, based on shows set and tentatively scheduled : 





CATEGORY 


ABC TV 


CBS TV 


NBC TV 


TOTAL 




Situation comedy 


12 


14 


2 


28 




Westerns 


4 


6 


6 


16 




Suspense-crime 
Adventure 


8 
6 


2 
4 


5 
4 


15 

14 




Comedy variety 
Anthology drama 
Quiz-panel 
Public affairs 



1 


1 


4 
3 
3 

1 


2 
1 
1 
2 


6 

5 ' 
4 
4 




Music 


1 





1 


2 




Straight variety 
Sports 
Feature films 




1 



1 






1 


1 

1 
1 




To be set 


1 


2 


5 


8 




Total 


35 


39 


31 


105 


SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 1961 











23 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Chalk up Rexall (BBDO) as an account that has no hesitancy about moving 
with the trends in network tv usage. 

Just a few seasons ago Rexall was addicted to specials. This season it sponsored an alter- 
nate half hour (National Velvet) . As it looks now, it will be allied with nighttime network 
spot carriers for the 1961-62 cycle. To wit, a spate of minute participations. 

At the rate that the brands are being wholesaled it looks as though R. J. Reyn- 
olds snagged three out of the four top-selling brands for the first 1961 quarter. 

The top five as they shape up: (1) Pall Mall (American) ; (2) Camel (RJR) ; (3) 
Winston (RJR); (4) Salem (RJR); (5) Lucky Strike (American). 

Incidentally, not one of the 40-odd brands that made their debut the past two years 
have been able to make a solid dent in the cigarette market. 

Nielsen has apparently found a good subscription response to syndicated audi- 
ence measurement of national magazines and network tv. 

It unveiled these names as subscribers to Nielsen Media Service: Compton, JWT, BBDO, 
Burnett, Maxon, D-F-S, Tatham-Laird, NL&B, Westinghouse, P&G, Chrysler, Nabisco. On the 
magazine side: Life and the Meredith group. 

As soon as CBS TV has put the finishing touches to its deal for the National 
League football games for the fall, it will ask Shell (OBM) whether it again wants 
to be a co-sponsor. 

It's a courtesy that the network extends to all previous season's customers. 

There's a report that Shell which is now entirely out of tv, is looking at nighttime net- 
work availabilities. 

P.S.: If Shell passes up the football broadcasts, the quarter section will go to Amoco 
which has the inside track. 

The networks will find, if they'll inquire around, that there's a school of me- 
dia buyers who think that it's to the advantage of tv to spot public affairs pro- 
graming in prime time and not only at the end of the evening spectrum. 

Their view is that this is a normally good sampling device. The quintile that cottons to 
such fare may see something like this among the regularly scheduled programs and come 
back the next week. 

They suggest that for the networks to fear the over-all effect public affairs programs in 
prime time would have on the night's rating is myopic in at least one respect. It militates 
against the broadening of the tv audience. 

The expansion of rotating plans and the continued curbing of product protec- 
tion among the tv networks could, as some mediamen see it, have marked selling 
repercussions in tv spot in the not too distant future. 

Observe these agency people: if rotation plans spread much more on the networks the 
stations may be fdrced to sell away from fixed position and instead sell on a basis of 
average ratings. 

What this would do to the status of salesmen and timebuyers, they interject, would 
be highly amusing to speculate about. 



For other new* coverage In this Issue: see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Sponsor-Week, page 27; Sponsor Week Wrap-Up, page 62; Washington Week, page 65; 
sponsor Hears, page 68; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 77; and Film-Scope, page 66. 



24 



SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 1961 



- 



IDEA 
RADIO 




A good idea is one that works well for everyone concerned. 
That is why kmox Radio in St. Louis (where it started) 
and other CBS Owned Radio Stations across America (which 
followed suit with their own local interpretations) are beam- 
ing about the provocative new programming idea called 

"At Your Service." 

In San Francisco, listeners 
hear "At Your Service" on Sta- 
tion rcbs; in Philadelphia on 
wcau; in New York on wcbs 
Radio. Up in Boston, the new 
program concept is known as 
"Listen!"over Station weei. In 
Los Angeles over Station rnx it is "Story Line." And now 
.Station wbbm is planning its own show for Chicago. Wher- 
jever listeners hear it, they are reacting eagerly to a stimulat- 
ing new kind of radio, more useful than ever in their lives. 

Here's how "At Your Service" places ra- 
dio in a more active role in its community. 
[St. Louis, for instance. Top Midwest person- 
ality, Jack Buck, opens the program with a 
press conference with an unusual twist. The 
(listening audience questions the guest of the 
day by phone. Answers are spontaneous— 
without rehearsal. The other important "reg- 




"AT YOUR SERVICE" IS PRESENT AS ANTIQUE 

VIOLIN IS APPRAISED BY J F. HUNLETH OF 

HUNLETH MUSIC STORE IN ST. LOUIS 



STEVE ROWAN COVERS THE NIGHT BEAT AT 
THE CORONERS COURT 




ST. LOUIS CARDINALS AT THE BALL FIELD 



ular" on the show is St. Louis 
educator, Professor Roy Mc- 
Carthy, whose lively give and 
take with the audience has be- 
come a favorite local topic. 

Next, "At Your Service" 
travels the main streets and 
the backrooms of St. Louis. 
Well-known kmox personalities 
make the news come alive through the mobile microphone. 
The gymnasium where the Red Birds are training; the com- 
plaint department of the Better Business Bureau; the back 
of a snow-plow— nothing is off limits for this culture-with- 
showmanship program. 

The final two hours are divided into lively 5-, 1 o-, and 1 5- 
minute time-segments, each devoted to a special department 
of news, sports, or provocative feature vignettes, coordinated 
and brightened by the presence of Jack Buck. 
You find this kind of idea broadcasting 
only on the CBS Owned Radio Stations across 
America. Already sponsors know listeners are 
really listening. Because listeners are really 
buying. 

Are you selling on the CBS Owned Radio 
Stations? They are at your service, too. 



THE CBS OWNED RADIO STATIONS 
WCBS, NEW YORK • WBBM, CHICAGO 

WCAU, PHILADELPHIA 

KNX, LOS ANGELES -WEEI, BOSTON 

KCBS, SAN FRANCISCO • KMOX, ST LOUIS 



>ONSOR • 10 APRIL 1961 



25 



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Latest tv and 
radio developments of 
the week, briefed 
for busy readers 



10 April 1961 



SPONSOR-WEEK 



+ DFS denies reports of local rate deals on L&M cigarettes 

^ Pay tv gets an Eastern kick, a West coast boost 

^ Net tv billing in January rose $4 million above last year 




CROSLEY MULLING GOING INTO REP FIELD 




Crosley Broadcasting Corp. management people will 
decide on 2 May whether the pioneer broadcast group 
should go into the field of station representation, a 
move they've been considering several weeks. 

Uniike other major groups 
which have toyed with the rep 
notion, Crosley did not initiate 
the idea. The Quality Radio 
group of two dozen radio sta- 
tions is understood to have 
|K^^ asked Robert Dunville, Crosley 

f <f$k ^k president, if company would be 

* ^ interested in representing non- 

Robert Dunville Cros|ey stations after studying 

its sales concepts for area stations (established, large 
facilities covering a large region). 

Crosley, before its decision, has been offered affilia- 
tion contracts by four stations. If it goes into represen- 
tation, it would probably not accept more than six be- 
cause of its own radio properties. Management of 
"rosley, answering the suggestion of Quality and some 
individual stations, proposed ideas new to the repre- 
sentation field if it were to decide to enter it. 

Among them: 

• Representation only of leader stations with area 
oroblems and with "integrity." 

• A 15% commission on business lasting a year, no 
commissions on the same business extending beyond 
that period. 

• A 20% commission on all business exceeding cur- 
'ent billings. 

(Continued on next page) 



DFS DENIES DIRECT DEAL RUMOR 

Ken Torgerson, senior associate media director at 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, flatly denied last week re- 
ports from representative sources that the agency is 
trying to buy radio time at local rather than national 
rates for L&M cigarettes (Liggett & Myers). 

Reports to SPONSOR from three representative or- 
ganizations and several rep sales executives suggested 
that special crews of field men were dealing with small 
stations directly and bypassing reps to get the lowest 
possible local rate. 

Torgerson said no representative had complained to 
him of this situation, that "we are not buying radio on 
local rates," that L&M business is "going to Keystone 
(Broadcasting System) and through reps." He referred 
to the ruckus as "scuttlebutt." 

Reps' concern is that such an attempt could lead to 
the placing at a local rate of all cigarette business, 
which they say is one of the last bulwarks for national 
rate business. In the past, such product groups as 
beers and cars have gone from a national to a local rate 
by channeling money through jobbers and distributors. 

Reps say the L&M money was slated to travel this 
path — and thus be removed from DFS' area of commis- 
sions. Those queried by SPONSOR knew of the Key- 
stone orders but consider them a usual and "legiti- 
mate" buy at a standard national rate. 

One rep last week asked an attorney to explore possi- 
bilities of legal action. One lawyer said a restraining 
order might be the device. 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



27 



FOCUS ON THE RIGHT INCOME AND EDUCATION... 

In 1960 ARB reported -WNEW-TV reaches 100% of the greater 
NewYork market! Now, in a special qualitative study, ARB reports 
that the audience of independent WNEW-TV is comparable 
in terms of Income and Education to the audience of the leading 
network television station in NewYork. WIVE V^'TV^* 

METROPOLITAN BROADCASTING ' 



INCOME-HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 



$11,000 & OVER 



EDUCATION-HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 



HIGH SCHOOL 



HIGH SCHOOL 60.4 



io April 1961/SP0NS0R-WEEK 



,. JCFrt^&Z&i 



(Continued from previous page) 

• A 30-day cancellation for the station arrangement. 
An order calling for 52 weeks of advertising, therefore, 
would be commissionable only for 30 days if the station 
sought to cancel the arrangement with Crosley. 

• A fixed policy against any kind of rate-cutting. 
There are both pro and con factions on the Crosley 

management team, with the outcome as to whether rep- 
resentation will be added for non-Crosley stations to be 
decided 2 May at a meeting of the management plan- 
ning committee. 

Pro factors: A tightly knit, national sales organization 
for the group's stations is now active, heavily backed 
with research and promotion personnel. 

It could be a money making proposition for the sales- 
men, Crosley and the parent company, Avco Mfg., which 
is known to have approved whatever the management 
group decides. 

Con factors: Outlay for salaries and additional sales 
personnel would be expensive initially. 

Management might divert what could be considered 
too much time away from Crosley endeavors. 



Harold McCormick to B. F. Goodrich 
as advertising/promotion manager 

Long-time appliance and electronics pro Harold J. 
McCormick has been named manager of advertising 
and promotion for the B. F. Goodrich Tire Co., Akron. 
He will be responsible for activity in tires and batteries 
as well as auto and home supplies for company-owned 
stores and dealers. 

McCormick worked most re- 
cently as v.p. and manager of 
the Frigidaire appliance ac- 
count at Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample, New York, before 
which he was advertising and 
sales promotion director for 

Motorola's radios, tv sets and 
H. J. McCormick stereo hi . fj units He - S worked 

also in executive positions at General Electric. 




Yardis agency merges with Zibman 

Yardis Advertising Co., Philadelphia has acquired the 
David Zibman Advertising Co., its fourth in the past year 
and a half. Raymond Rosenberg continues as president 
Df the parent company, with Zibman as vice president 
and plans board member. 
Rosenberg says Yardis has tripled its size and billings 

n this 18-month period, during which it also consoli- 
dated with the Edward Robinson Agency, the Samue! 
faubman Agency and Flacks-Abramson Agency, the last 

n Trenton, N. J. 



Identification, reach combine to give 
Lorillard 125 million tv messages 

"Sponsor identification" and "reach" are twin goals 
in '61 tv campaign of P. Lorillard, Harold F. Temple, 
president and chief executive officer, told shareholders 
in New York last week. Latest in rash of annual reports, 
the Lorillard summary notes tv 
gets more money than any 
other medium because of its 
"dramatic and continuing 
growth, power" in sales. 

Temple backgrounded his 
decision to combine sponsor 
identification with reach in de- 
livering 125 million tv sales 
messages per week to viewers. 

"We get maximum benefits 
from both (approaches), using sponsorship on three 
shows (four and one-half commercials weekly), partici- 
pations in four (four commercials weekly)." 

Explaining complex matter of net tv costs, he told 
shareholders "We get an average cost of $3.93 to reach 
1,000 people on an hour show, $4.74 to reach a similar 
number during a half-hour." 

He said sponsorship of an hour at $250,000 is "patent- 
ly impossible." 




Harold Temple 



$250,000 CLAMORENE RADIO SPOOF 

New Glamorene radio commercials scheduled to take 
the air in 45 markets today (10) spoof some of the sa- 
cred cows of radio copywriters. 

Such standards as testimonials, obvious humor and 
over-exposure of kiddoes are dusted off with humor in 
the new series. Spot radio is getting the bulk of a $253,- 
000 budget placed through Riedl and Freede agency, 
Clifton, N. J. 

Glamorene Products of that city hits heaviest for its 
household cleaners in this spring seasonal clean-up 
time. 



PONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



16 net tv participations for Metrecal 

Mead Johnson for its Metrecal reducing aid has 
bought through Kenyon & Eckhardt eight nighttime 
minute participations equally divided between ABC TV 
and NBC TV and eight daytime minute participations 
on ABC TV. Springtime campaign is estimated to cost 
$40,000, at the rate of two network minutes weekly fa,' 
each of eight weeks. 



29 



r 




BURLINGTON 



;J Winston-Salem/TTJ, r—i , . 
Vr' 1 \ <y^ U J 1/ . . / 

\°.V. ,* r-. r' . ' High Po.ntA , . 

, v -STATESVIUE ■ i LEXINGTON | / o , '• o 

"SALISBURY ASHEBORO 

„»3£MARIE 



Spend your time more profitably 
in North Carolina where WSJS 
television gives you grade A 
coverage of a bigger retail sales 
market than any other station 



television 
Winston-Salem / Greensboro 

CHANNEL 12 




PETERS, GRIFFIN. WOODWARD- REPS 



:u) 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL I%1 



io April 1961/SP0NS0R- WEEK 

wmmmmummmmmmmmsm 




w 

Art Duram 



PAY TV: BLAST IN PITTSBURGH 
AND A PUSH IN HOLLYWOOD 

An explosive blast against pay tv was lodged last 
week at a meeting of the Pittsburgh Radio-Tv Club by 
Art Duram, senior v. p. for air media at Fuller & Smith 
& Ross. 

Pay tv made news on the 
West coast, too, as National 
Telefilm Associates announced 
its plan to manufacture and 
license a pay tv home enter- 
tainment system. 

Duram outlined the "myths" 
of pay tv, key among them: 

• "There is not a vast reser- 
voir of talent and material 
ready to silence critics, entertain public. There is prac- 
tically NO reservoir. 

• "There is not an exciting future in special events 
because free tv has and will do an outstanding job of 
giving the viewer everything ne wants. 

• "Pay tv is not an opportunity to make minority or 
intellectual groups happy with the kind of programing 
they desire." 

He warned his audience of ad and broadcast men that 
"Unless we find some meeting ground between tastes of 
masses and intellectuals, some mighty money men are 
going to take over our job of filling that 24-inch screen." 

NTA, working with Home Entertainment Co., says the 
new system for pay tv "costs 50% less to manufacture, 
70% less to install and 70% less to maintain" than 
competitive systems. 

It would offer viewers three pay tv channels, two with 
pay programing and one free with show information and 
entertainment. 



c 



ombo media plans give hypo to radio 

Reports from Chicago and New York last week point 
to a blending of radio and print in the media mix as a 
big reason for the hypo in radio this spring. 

SPONSOR'S Midwest staff reports heavy combination 
-adio-print business as advertisers, scrutinizing what 
Jheir dollars buy, take note of radio's "ability to hit hard 
oetween impressions of other high-impact media." 

Among them: Commander through Leo Burnett; Ac- 
cent (NL&B), various dog foods with the exception of 
<en-L-Ration, and most farm machinery — International 
Harvester, John Deere and J. I. Case (with the notable 
exception of Massey-Ferguson). 

In New York, Pepsi-Cola President Herbert L. Barnet 
noted in an annual stockholders report that the com- 
pany was "largest user of network radio and the fifth 
argest for color newspaper ads" last year. 



Ad Row's 'clumsy amateurs' 

"There s no business that so thoroughly punishes 
tlie clums) amateur." Charles Brown, hoard chair- 
man of BBDO. noted this fact of advertising life in 
his report to stockholders on L960's progress. 

"In a business such as ours, where hoys and girls 
become men and women rapidly, you've got to 
have a lot more than heart. You've got to have 
that — plus responsibility, sensitivity, judgment, un- 
derstanding." 



JANUARY NET TV BILLINGS UP 
$4 MILLION FROM LAST YEAR 

National advertisers spent $4 million more on network 
tv time this past January than during the same month 
in 1960, with an average dollar gain of 7.1% averaged 
for all three nets. 

So Television Bureau of Advertising reported last 
week, noting that the biggest gains were scored for day- 
time slots and at ABC TV. Latter saw a 19.9% rise in 
gross time billing, contrasted with a 9.6% gain for NBC 
TV and a 2.3% drop for CBS TV, all for comparable Jan- 
uary periods. 

LNA-BAR analysis of sales by day parts shows that 
daytime for the full week was up 21.8%, with Monday- 
Friday periods rising 28.5% and weekend slots down 
.6%. Nighttime time sales rose .9%. 

All told, gross billings for time periods sold in Jan- 
uary amounted to $61.8 million — $40.8 million at night 
and $21 million daytime. 



ABC division contributed $222 million 
of AB-PT's '60 total of $334 million 

Springtime verve and optimism were reflected in AB- 
PT's annual report to stockholders released last week. 

The ABC division contributed the bulk of the com- 
pany's income for the year — $222.4 million of a $334.4 
million total. Gains in tv were especially auspicious, 
with these summaries reported by the network. 

• "First position in share of audience during prime 
evening hours" in three-network markets; 

• Addition of 16 full-time primary affiliates, with a 
total of 115 stations giving direct live coverage of 88% 
of the nation's tv homes; 

• Share of nighttime home viewing hours went from 
32% of the three-net total in '59 to 34% in '60; 

• Gross time sales zoomed 26% above '59, "again the 
largest percentage as well as dollar increase" of the 
networks. 

Dollar billings for time moved from $20 million in 1953 
to $120-plus in '59 and $160 million in 1960. 



pt'ONSOK 



10 APRIL 1961 



More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 62 







I I 

I I 



K (*)- 



i i 

i i 



(■> 




lie laughs best (®) wlio laughs last 



3 



Some people started laughing right off the bat when they heard we planned to concentrate on comedy this season. They 
were sure it wouldn't work. These days they're not laughing so hard— but the nation's viewers are, and so are the sponsors 
of our comedy programs. The audiences attracted by the average comedy program on the three networks this season tell 
the story: Network Y— 7.3 million homes... Network Z— 8.9 million homes... CBS Television Network, 9.5 million homes.* 
Moreover, in the latest Nielsen report three of our funniest shows are in the Top 10— and two of them are brand new this 
season. t But the thing that keeps all our advertisers smiling is that the CBS Television Network attracts the biggest average 
audiences in every category of entertainment, laughs or no laughs. • Nji.onw.de Nielsen, en pm.AA.ioct . i96o-t Mar. i96i 1 1 Ma.. i96i, aa (cbs: 7 f top io> 



CBS Television Network 




OLD NEW ORLEANS 
FAVORITE. . . 



Here's how to 
make it: 












Season 6 fillets of red snapper 
(each 6- or 7-oz.) with salt and 
pepper, rub with butter, broil until 
done. 

Prepare dressing: Combine 1 
cup dry, fine bread crumbs with 1 
cup raw shrimp (peeled, deveined 
and chopped), 1 cup chopped raw 
oysters, 1 cup chopped scallions 
(green and white). Saute these in- 
gredients in 2 tbsp. melted butter 
and add 2 tbsp. fish stock. Yields 
6 portions. 

Heap dressing on brown side of 
broiled fillets. Serve piping hot, 
with garnish of your choice. 



Dinner by candlelight at The Old Absinthe House 

WWL-TV. . . new New Orleans Favorite 

Few programs in New Orleans television history have received the praise and applause — 
both on a local and on a national scale — as that received by "Channel 4 Reports," a news- 
public service feature produced by WWL-TV News Director Bill Reed. 

One "Report" show, entitled "Crisis In Our Time" and dealing with the explosive inte- 
gration disturbances which rocked New Orleans last fall, drew praise on a national scale from 
Sponsor magazine columnist Joe Csida: 

"This certainly is a prime example of the increasingly brave, socially aware attitude of 
our broadcasters . . ." 

And, locally, the editor of the 
New Orleans Times- Picayune not 
only made a personal request that 
the show be repeated but also pub- 
lished a message to the general public 
promoting the repeat showing. This 
shows the respect and esteem in 
which WWL-TV's public affairs 
programming is held even by its 
competition. 



WWL-TV 

NEW ORLEANS 



Represented Nationally by Katz 



34 



SPONSOR • 10 AI'KII. 1961 






SPONSOR 

10 APRIL 1961 



1961 spot forecast: tv up 7%, radio up 5% 

Millions 
$600 



500 



100 























—to spot— 


















— - — •■< 


-radio spot" 





















'56 



'57 



'58 



'59 



'60 



'61 



Figures from 1959-60, prepared by McCann-Erickson for "Printers Ink," refer to total client 
spending: time, talent, production and commercials (1960 based on nine-month data). SRA and 
TvB predict ; ons would make M-E's 1961 totals: radio, $220.5 million; television, $546 million 



GOOD NEWS! SPOT ON MOVE! 



^ Radio and tv spot expected to benefit most quickly 
among media to economic upturn and have record year 

^ Heavy March buying adds to feeling much ad money 
held back during slowdown was always intended for spot 



-^*pot radio and television, despite a 
slow start, can expect a record year 
in 1961. The feeling in the industry 
is that the spot media — more sensi- 
tive to the zig-zags of the national 
economy than any others — will re- 
hound quickly with bettering of eco- 
nomic conditions. 

Strong spot buying in March, after 



a slow January and February, has 
boosted media morale, and selling — 
especially in tv — is expected to be ex- 
tremely brisk for April and May. 
Most observers also agree that sum- 
mer will be about the same as last 
year and fall very heavy. Radio had 
its best 1960 period in the second 
quarter and can be expected to fol- 



low last year's pattern from now on. 

A big second quarter will also 
prove, representative and station 
sources declared, that money kept on 
the shelf by advertisers — as they held 
back to judge conditions — was allo- 
cated to spot all along. 

Because spot is so tied to the ups 
and downs of the nation's business, 
there are several factors, they pointed 
out, that have turned the 1961 ar- 
row upward: 

• Because of the short-term buys 
possible with spot, it is the first to 
benefit from the upturn as it was the 
first to feel the pinch last summer. 

• Because of the market-bv-mar- 
ket nature of the spot media, they 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



35 



are ideal i<u the introduction of new 
products. In tlic 1960's, big adver- 
tisers will have to come out with 
more and more new products to keep 
up their profit margins. This has al- 
ready been evident. The value of 
spol to the smaller firm (the clas-i< 
t\ example being Lest oil) is well 
documented. 

• Because auto buying and pro- 
duction usually reflect quickly on 
spot billings, an expected upturn 
this summer should help spot. Auto 
production means a steel pick-up, 
and all of this spurs a lot of adver- 
tisers. i:ets a lot of complementary 
industries moving. 

• Because newspapers are giving 
headline treatment to \arious in- 
quiries into air media — especially 
ratings — there is a feeling, articu- 
lated mostly in the mid-West, that 
some advertisers may divert money 
into spot rather than sponsor the 
public-service type programs that will 
evolve, programs that Congress and 
the FCC wants hut which onlv a 



small segment of the population 
watches. Instead, advertisers are ex- 
pected to latch on to adjacencies of 
popular shows wherever possible. 
This thinking is based on the theory 
that tv money lost to the network is 
most likely to end up in spot. 

Hut reps and station men saw sev- 
eral good signs that indicate that 
most stations can expect a good year. 
lii-t. not many of them expected a 
verj good March and April, and this 
was reversed. Second, in tv especial- 
ly even when things fell off at the 
beginning of the year there was no 
unusual "chiz-biz" — i.e., no selling 
off at local rates. This indicates 
soundness in a medium, they said, 
when it has held the line. Third, 
salesmen were pretty much on the 
jump at mid-March, getting quick 
availabilities and confirmations, and 
are, to all appearances, hepped upon 
making it a big spring. 

Radio had been slow until March, 
which was as brisk as the weather — 
particularly in Chicago. "Radio," as 



Larry Webb, managing director o: 
the SRA, put it. "depends on tlx 
economy. If things continue to picl 
up generally, we have high hopei 
that radio will. 

"Under these conditions, then i: 
no reason why radio shouldn't be ; 
good deal better than in I960. Th< 
second quarter, in fact, should he i 
good deal better than last year. an< 
that was our best 1960 quarter. Over 
all. I'd say we'll hit $200 million.' 
(SRA estimates are based on timi 
sales; for 1960, SRA estimated spo 
radio at $191 million.) 

Television's 1961 outlook is variei 
depending on which markets one ii 
judging. The major markets, accon 
ing to Larry Israel, president o 
TvAR, are in for a record year. "\\'i 
had a very good first quarter." h< 
declared. "Major markets make th< 
difference. The medium is picking uj 
now; with a new wave of spot buy 
ing it's definitely increasing in tem 
po . We are hopeful for a better thai 
average or at least a normal summer 



What sellers say about 1961 prospects for spot tv and radic 




MAJOR MARKETS, says TvAR's Larry Is- 
rael (left), should have a good year, but no 
particular "boom" should be expected. There 
will be some spotty periods, but over-all he ex- 
pects a record year for his firm's represented 
stations. G. Richard Swifl (right) of Boil- 
ing says smaller markets may be exceptions 
to the record year, "due to the fact that net- 
work participation schedules have diverted 
money that would ordinarily have been allo- 
cated to spot television in the small and 
in some medium-sized markets. 

RADIO WAS BRISK in March, says Larry- 
Webb ilejt) of SRA, and "if things continue 
to pick up generally, we have high hopes that 
radio uill" for the whole year. He predicts 
a 5'f increase over the record spot radio 
billings of I960. George C. Lindsay I right l . 
director of TvB's midivest bureau, thinks that 
spring and summer "look very good," and 
notes that tv-vieuing hit an all-time high in 
February, and neiv I\ielsen-TvB data, refut- 
ing the summer audience fall-off, should en- 
tourage the advertisers." 




36 



SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 196 



New, improved brands are boosting spot tv. Here are 25 

Description Client Agency 



Brand 



ivlin 


cough remedy 


Chesebrough-Pond's 


Compton 


Allrest 


allergy control 


Pharma-Craft 


Papert, K&L 


Brim 


calorie control 


General Foods 


Y&R 


Choice 


hand soap 


Colgate-Palmolive 


Ted Bates 


Gainesburgers 


dog food 


General Foods 


Y&R 


Green Giant 


new frozen food line 


Green Giant Co. 


Burnett 


Johnson's Shoe Poltsh 


for men, women, children 


S. C. Johnson Co. 


B&B 


Knoor Soups 


packaged soups 


Corn Products 


L&N 


Life 


high protein cereal 


Quaker 


JWT 


Lifebuoy 


green soap 


Lever Bros. 


SSC&B 


Mayonette 


low-calorie mayonnaise 


Frenchette-Carter 


Ted Bates 


Micrin 


oral mouthwash 


Johnson & Johnson 


Y&R 


Millbrook Bread 


bread 


National Biscuit 


McC-E 


Mrs. Butterworth' 's 


Maple Syrup 


maple syrup 


Lever Bros. 


JWT 


"New" Rinso Blue 


improved detergent 


Lever Bros. 


SSC&B 


"New" Premium Duz 


improved detergent 


P&G 


Compton 


Post Top Three 


cereals 


General Foods 


B&B 


Quaker Puffed Grains 


for adult weight watchers 


Quaker 


Compton 


Reward 


all-purpose detergent 


Lever Bros. 


JWT 


Rit Tints & Dyes 


new line for garments 


Corn Products 


SSC&B 


Sego 


900-calorie formula 


Pet Milk 


Gardner 


Starlight Shampuff 


shampoo in pads 


Lever Bros. 


JWT 


Summer Country 


margerine 


Lever Bros. 


SSC&B 


Trenton Cake Mix 


cake mixes 


Trenton Milling 


Adams & K 


Jim 


detergent 


Lever Bros. 


OB&M 


Waterman Pens 


new line 


Waterman-Bic Co. 


Ted Bates 



''There will, of course, be a great 
ariance from market to market,'' he 
dmitted, "but by and large, the ma- 
or markets should have a good year, 
t's not fair, however, to predict any 
ig boom, as there will be some spot- 
f periods. But overall, we expect a 
etter year in 1961 for our markets 

and 1960 was a record year for 
s." 



G. Richard Swift, president of The 
Boiling Co.'s tv division, noted that 
while the big March selling brought 
first quarter spot up to or above 
1960, there were a number of mar- 
kets which have felt some drop. 

"The biggest exceptions have been 
the smaller markets," he said. "They 
have not enjoyed as much dollar vol- 
ume primarily due to the fact that 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



network participation schedules have 
diverted money that would ordinarily 
have been allocated to spot television 
in the small and in some medium- 
sized markets. 

"Despite the siphoning of national 
spot dollars." he predicted, "we are 
looking for greater development of 
new advertising in the third and 
especially the fourth quarters of this 



37 



year thai >% i 1 1 more than offset losses 
and put llu> L961 total dollar figure 
ahead of last yeai 

"To %% luii degree," Ik* added, "ia 
nut immediatel) discernable, but a 
favorable climate lias been forecasl 
for overall business and this can be 
expected to reflect further increases 
in national ad dollars.' 

In the midwest, optimism i- run- 
ning high for the immediate future 
of spot — both radio and t\. Main of 
the factors making for Chicago s rosj 
attitude are the same as in New 
York: new products using spot, gen- 
eral economic upturn trends, hopes 
for an improved auto buying year. 
An added factor is increased market 
penetration. Several recent buys 
have been on a multi-station per 
market basis. 

Spring and even summer look 
"\cr\ good" for spot tv at TvB's 
midwest division. Director George 
C. Lindsaj noted that "tv viewing 
hit an all time high in February, and 
new Nielsen-TvB data, refuting the 
summer audience fall-off. should en- 
courage the advertiser awareness of 
television's summer potential. " 

Part of the bright outlook stems 
from the feeling that the network 
spot carriers will not drain as much 
mone\ from the midwest as they will 
from the east this year. Thomas S. 
Buchanan, v.p. in charge of midwest 
sales at Everett-McKinnev. supported 
this theorx. and said that "as a re- 
sult, we see every indication that the 
third and fourth quarter spot radio 
and tv orders placed from here will 
again break records this year. Spot 
radio and tv," he said, "are ideal 
media for the main regional mid- 
west advertisers whose distribution 
does not need network coverage." 

Dwight "Doc" Reed, executive v.p. 
of H-R. Chicago, noted that some ad- 
vertisers were placing shorter sched- 
ules this year, but, despite this, spot 
income will be greater than in 1')(>(I. 
The reason: "Accounts are concen- 
trating more in market participation, 

more stations are being used in each 
market, and this will increase total 
spot revenue." 

But the talk i about spot t\ i in 

New "York was concentrated on new 

products. Putting the situation verj 

aptl\. Halsev Barrett, The kal/ 

i Please turn to page 58 > 



38 






WHAT'S BEHIND THE 

^ All three nets will have prime time cartoon serie 
in 1961-52 paid for by advertisers with adult product 

^ Seven shows are set for the tv webs. The cartooi 
trend also hits national spot and syndication programing 



f^ show to watch this season. The 
Flintstones — first half-hour regular 
prime-time cartoon series on tv — has 
come through in two ways. 

First, good Nielsens put it in the 
circle of new hits of the year. This 
led to renewals by Miles Lahs and R. 
J. Reynolds. 

Second -and much more impor- 
tant — the show seems to have 
touched off a programing trend to- 
ward cartoons for 1961-62. It could 
be the biggest trend since the West- 
erns. ABC TV ma\ he the prime 
mover in cartoons as it was in 
\\ esterns at first. 

There'll be seven cartoon shows on 
the networks, possibly one or two 
more. Every network has at least 
one, hut ABC TV has the most. 

ABC TV will be represented with 
two new cartoon series and two re- 



newals: Top Cat and Calvin and th 
Colonel are new and Flintstones an 
Bugs Bunny are in the renewal cat* 
gory. 

CBS TV has one new series, Alvi 
and the Chipmunks. 

NBC TV's two shows are in coloi 
Each is refurbished but not total! 
new. They are: Walt Disney's Wot 
derful World of Color and Bu 
Winkle. 

Paralleling the network cartofl 
vogue is the trend in national spl 
besides Kellogg's three series. Poi 
cereals has Dick Tracy. There ai 
also a spate of syndicated cartoo 
shows. 

\\ In a cartoon vogue? \\ In now 
Who is it for? Who watches? Wh 
are the sponsors? I low big can th 
trend get'r' What, if any, are il 
natural limits? 



FIRST of the regular nighttime half-hour tv cartoon series and one of the ratings hits i 
the present season is 'The Flintstones' on ABC TV, renewed by Miles and R. J. Reynolds fi 
ne^t year. Show is by Hanna-Barbera, who began with three others for Kellogg in national sp< 







xl'ONsnl! 



10 APRIL \9( 



TREND TO NETWORK CARTOONS 



Until a few years ago cartoons 
leant one of two things: animated 
haracters in commercials, and Hol- 
ywood cartoons made for theaters 
nd shown by stations. There were 
ome network cartoons, but they 
^ere either brief segments, like Rufj 
nd Ready, or short-lived, like Boing- 
'oing. 

Then a cartoon revival occurred — 
ut still not on the network level. 
Kellogg put one, then two, finally 
bree cartoons into national spot: 
fucklebei'ry Hound, Quick Draw 
IcGraw, and Yogi Bear. All were 
lade by Hanna-Barbera, through 
'creen Gems. The made-for-tv car- 
jon was slowly replacing its an- 
estor. the theatrical cartoon. 

Finally last fall ABC TV decided 
) take a chance. It put a regular 
lalf-hour cartoon series into the 
rime-time schedule: The Flintstones. 
dso out of the Hanna-Barbera shop, 
ne show was scheduled at 8:30 p.m. 
riday. 

1 The Flintstones was one of the 
«its among the season's new network 
pows. Its Nielsen average for the 
!;ason is 23.6 ( average audience) 
nd 38% share. The latest Nielsen 



puts it 15th among shows for aver- 
age audience with a 41.9 share and a 
25.4 rating. The 17 March 24-city 
Nielsen gives Flintstones a 31.4 rat- 
ing and a 50 share. 

ABC TVs other regular cartoon 
series this year, Bugs Bunny, made 
by Warner Bros., was also a rating 
success. 

For fall ABC TV has sold two new 
series: Top Cat, produced by Hanna- 
Barbera (Wednesday at 8:30 p.m., to 
Bristol-Myers and Kellogg) — the lat- 
ter the most experienced advertiser 
with cartoon shows on tv today. 
ABC also sold Calvin and the Colo- 
nel to Whitehall and Lever Bros, for 
Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. 

CBS TV's new cartoon series is 
Alvin and the Chipmunks, made by 
Format Films, scheduled at 7:30 
p.m. Wednesday, and sold to General 
Foods and probably General Toy. 

NBC TV's Walt Disney's Wonder- 
ful World of Color is sold to RCA 
and to Eastman Kodak, a full hour at 
7:30 p.m. Sunday, preceded at 6:30 
by Bull Winkle for General Mills, 
also in color. 

Today's cartoon vogue clearly has 
several aspects, all important. Pro- 



graming has graduated from chil- 
dren's fare to family fare, but many 
of the producers started in juvenile 
entertainment. Hanna-Barbera. War- 
ner Bros., and Walt Disney all went 
into tv cartooning with a heavy 
emphasis on younger viewers. 

All of the cartoons are scheduled 
in early evening. All leave the air by 
9 p.m., and most of them by 8 p.m. 
From the network viewpoint it 
means catching the younger viewers 
relatively early in the evening and 
attempting to use their influence to 
control the set into the middle part of 
the evening. 

Advertisers in the shows are inter- 
ested in adults, not children. With 
the exception of Kellogg, General 
Mills, and General Toy, these adver- 
tisers all have adult products: Miles, 
R. J. Reynolds, Bristol-Myers, Gen- 
eral Foods, RCA, and Eastman 
Kodak. 

Some insiders see an eventual con- 
flict between the producers and net- 
works, who are interested in a chil- 
dren's audience, and the advertisers, 
who want adults. But no problems 
have cropped up yet. R. J. Reynolds 
( Please turn to page 58) 



HEATRICAL PRODUCERS are stepping up tv cartoon production, 
'arner Bros.' 'Bugs Bunny' is renewed on ABC TV; Disney switches 
iom ABC TV to NBC TV, goes to color and to a full hour in the fall 




IN PREPARATION is tv's greatest crop of new cartoons to date. 
Storyboards are from 'Top Cat' on ABC TV; others include 'Calvin 
and the Colonel' on ABC TV and 'Alvin and the Chipmunks' on CBS TV 




i'ONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



39 




MAPPING OUT super-saturation campaigns is a joint project at Zubrow. Here vice president 
and account executive Bill Drutt (hand on ear) discusses new strategy with (I to r) timebuyer 
Yolanda Tini, art director Ed Macon, merchandising director Ted Stein and other staff members 



SO YOU THINK YOU 
BUY SATURATION? 

^ Illinois food producer, Brooks Foods, buys 400-700 
spots a week per radio station through S. E. Zubrow 

^ Brooks' sales are up considerably since its crash spot 
radio effort began last year in three midwest markets 



"Y 



oianda, buy 600 spots on 
WMAQ, Chicago, for the week of 
the 4th, for Brooks." You heard it 
right. The man said 600, for just 
one week, on one station, in one 
market. 

The man in this case is Bill Drutt, 
vice president and account executive 
at S. E. Zubrow, Inc., Philadelphia 
agencj for Brooks Foods. Yolanda 
is Zubrow's timebuyer Yolanda Tini, 
and it is nothing for her to buy any- 
where from 400-740 spots per week, 
per station in a given market on be- 
half of Brooks. She bu\s these in- 
tense radio saturation campaigns in 
-i\- to eight-week flights. 

These crash buys are made four 
times a year in three markets — Chi- 



cago, Indianapolis and St. Louis — 
on behalf of Brooks' three most pop- 
ular specialty items: catsup, barbe- 
que sauce and chili hot beans. 

"When you're competing for sales 
with giants like Heinz, Hunt's, Del 
Monte, you've gotta do some fast 
thinking," explained Drutt. "They've 
got the extensive advertising budg- 
ets and can go all-out in tv, radio, 
print, billboards, you name it," he 
said. 

When Zubrow took over the 
Brooks account about a year ago, it 
decided to concentrate its low six fig- 
ure budget in one medium, in 
just a few select markets, and for just 
three of their major products. (The 
other products are tomato juice, pork 



and beans and a variety of soups.) 

"\\ ith Brooks 1 limited ad budget! 
we built their advertising campaign 
on two principles: (1) concentration 
of the advertising dollar b\ market 
territory, and (2 1 integration of ad- 
vertising, sales promotional elTml 
and -ale- elTort." said Drutt. 

Out of Brooks' 33 mid-western 
marketing territories, Zubrow select 
ed Chicago. Indianapolis and St 
Louis for this concentration. 

"After selecting radio as the Iks! 
buy for Brooks, we decided we would 
completer) dominate those station* 
we'd use in these three markets w itli 
from 400-700 spots per week," said 
Bill Sherry. Zubrow media director, 
"In some cases we were on ever) I 
minutes, round-the-clock, on a givoj 
station," he said. 

Stations which received this ex- 
tensive business last vear included 
WMAQ and WLS, Chicago: WIBC. 
Indianapolis, and KWK and KXOE, 
St. Louis. 

On the creative end, Drutt and hi? 
staff extended the concentration prin- 
ciple by building all of the Brooks 
copy around a single theme: "There's 
a sizzle in the flavor of Brooks' tanfl 
catsup (barbeque sauce or chile hoi 
beans)." 

Fi\e-seeond and minute spot- were 
bought, primarily the former. In the 
case of minutes, the five-second spot 
was used as a lead-in to live copy 
prepared for local announcers. 

Meanwhile, Brooks' own chiel ex- 
ecutives, Glen Knaub, vice presides! 
and general manager, and Josemi 
Butts, general sales manager, got be- 
hind the campaign by generating en 
tbusiasm among the sales force, brok 
ers, and production personnel 
through a series of presentations. 

In terms of the integration princi 
pal, all merchandising was tied ir 
with the advertising. "To get tin 
fullest utilization of this advertising 
the promotional and dealer allow 
ances in markets where we used sat 
uration was less than in market' 
where we bought considerably light 
er radio," said Drutt. 

In addition, the agencx recom 
mended the use of a "Brooks Broad 
cast Bonus Plan." Inder this setup 
Brooks spots were shared with ke; 
chain and independent grocers in ex 
change for displays and promotion 



40 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 196 



of Brooks products in stores. 

What about results? In the first 
10 months of the campaign (April 
1960-January 1961) Brooks' sales 
were running 20% ahead of the pre- 
ceding year in markets where the ra- 
dio concentration was used, Drutt re- 
ported. Total company sales, includ- 
ing all Brooks products wherever 
they are sold, are running about 10% 
ahead of the previous year, he said. 

The number of key advertising 
markets for the present fiscal year 
has been increased to five, the two 
newcomers being Detroit and Cleve- 
land. Brooks' total advertising budg- 
et has been increased by 35%. This 
is due to the increase in sales, Drutt 
pointed out. 

Needless to say the client is de- 



lighted. "We have together devel- 
oped a smooth team effort in the first 
year of our relationship," said Glen 
Knaub. "Our agency, sales manage- 
ment and general management meet 
in regular joint sessions for budget- 
ing and objective planning. In addi- 
tion, the sales management and 
agency work together at the opera- 
tional level — that is, in the field as 
well as at the plant." 

Brooks' plant is in Collinsville, 111. 
The company has been in operation 
for over 50 years. In 1959 it merged 
with Ritter food products of Bridge- 
ton, N. J. 

This concentrated use of spot ra- 
dio is "representative of the philoso- 
phy of operations of Brooks and 
Zubrow," said Bill Sherry. "In to- 



day's competitive environment the 
small advertiser can make effective 
use of his advertising budget to get 
sales increases," he said. 

"The entire economic scene has 
changed in the last 10 years," Shern 
pointed out. "Ten years ago, people 
were 'buying, buying, buying.' But 
today with unemployment and the 
changing structure of the economy, 
the little companies and the big com- 
panies have to compete for the same 
sales dollar. We do it with con- 
centration." 

But why such intense concentra- 
tion? "You have to tantalize the 
housewife, penetrate her mind and 
emotions," said Bill Sherry. "You 
have to create a state of mind in her 
(Please turn to page 60) 



AGENCY ANSWERS THREE PERTINENT QUESTIONS 



Why does Zubrow buy so many spots for Brooks? 

ZUBROWS THEORY is that when a low budget advertiser is competing with giant corporations he 
must concentrate his buying in one medium, in a limited number of markets. In order to create a state of 
mind in the potential buyer, who has been using a name brand, Zubrow believes in monopolizing a sta- 
tion and pounding away at the listener. Copy line is also concentrated and repetitious. 

How does the agency find all those availabilities? 

THE AGENCY has learned that to find 700 or so availabilies it must do its buying months in advance. 
Stations are reluctant to sell such huge blocks of time. It is fairly unprecedented and it might tend to 
alienate other customers, say the stations. Zubrow is willing to wait for a long period of time to put 
through its desired super-saturation orders. 



What is the cost discount in these situations? 

THERE IS no set pattern or framework which stations go by in buys of this quantity, Zubrow has found. 
Stations are not prepared for these buys in their rate structures. Therefore discounts are negotiated sep- 
arately in each case. In one instance Zubrow found a 1,000 time discount but used it up very fast, and 
had to renegotiate with the station. 



« 



BEDSIDE NETWORK" AIDS VETS 



^ 400 admen and broadcasters provide unique rehabilitation help through VHRTC 
for the more than 125,000 patients in 1 15 veterans hospitals aeross the eonntrj 



I his week marks the thirteenth an- 
niversary of tin* "Bedside Network, 
a unit) Lit- cooperative endeavor <>f the 
broadcasting, entertainment and ad- 
vertising industries that is bringing 

hope and pleasure to thousands of 

the nations hospitalized veterans. 

The "Bedside Network" is the 
"brand name" of the Veterans Hos- 
pital Radio and Television Guild, a 
group of more than 400 professional 



advertising men. actors, writers, di- 
rectors, engineers and musicians who 
volunteer their services to aid in the 
rehabilitation of 126.001 patients in 
115 Veterans Administration hos- 
pitals across the country. 

Lending their talents in an) way 
possible from directing performances 
in locked menial wards to typing 
scripts and raising money, these 
dedicated volunteers from Madison 



\\enue and Broadwa) encouragi 
and train the hospitalized veterans t< 
produce and perform in the all 
patient shows which are taped fo 
broadcast over the hospitals' closed 
circuit radio and T\ networks. 

I he idea, as it was conceived hi 
the VHRTG's co-founder, A. Car 
Rigrod, a vice-president of Donahui 
& One advertising agency, is to teacl 
the patients to entertain themseha 



VOLUNTEER members of VHRTG help veteran patients to produce and perform in closed circuit radio/tv shows at hospitals. Below, Nane 
Moore, actress and writer, patient, William Kaufman, NBC Sales, Wallace Green, editor Western Publishing Co. at work on a typical projec 




42 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 196 




BEDSIDE NETWORK' members meet to discuss fund-raising drive. (I. to r.) Lawrence Ker- 
itein, chmn. VHRTG Committee for Admen's Post of American Legion, Richard Salant, pres. 
CBS News and RTES, Anne Seymour, actress, and Joe McDonough, v. p. Cunningham and Walsh 



hospitals in 48 states. Writers also 
volunteer their skills in preparing 
the scripts for use by the hospitals. 

To carry on its work, the "Bedside 
Network" must rely on voluntary 
contributions solicited entirely in the 
New York area. It receives no finan- 
cial aid from Federal or state govern- 
ments and operates on a tight budget 
of $25,000 a year. 

Another chronic need is for volun- 
teers — anyone who can answer a tele- 
phone, type a news release, operate 
a tape recorder or carry a tune. The 
work is often tedious and difficult, 
but the rewards are as obvious as the 
smile on a paralyzed veteran's face. 

Returning from a visit to a hos- 
pital ward reserved for quadrapa- 
legics, VHRTG member Bill Kauf- 
man, of NBC sales, shook his head 
and said: 

"I'd like to take every guy on 
Madison Avenue and walk him 
through that ward. I defy anyone to 
look at those men and not be moved 
to help." ^ 



*nd at the same time to involve them 
n a group activity which has proved 
o have a valuable therapeutic effect, 
specially on mental patients. 

From the beginning, the "Bedside 
Network" has had the support of the 
eaders of the advertising and broad- 
asting industries, as well as veterans' 
md service groups. Members of the 
\d Men's Post No. 209 of the Amer- 
can Legion and the American Red 
^ross act as drivers for the teams of 
volunteers who visit VA hospitals in 
he New York area four nights a 
.veek. 

Arthur Hull Hayes, president of 
BS Radio, and Stanley Adams, 
resident of the American Society of 
Composers, Authors and Publishers, 
serve on the VHRTG advisory coun- 
cil. On the organization's board of 
overnors are Claude Barrere, execu- 
ive director of the Radio and Tele- 
vision Executives Society, and G. 
Thaine Engle, manager of NBC's na- 
ional advertising department. 

The networks and individual writ- 
ers donate radio and television 
scripts to the "Bedside Network's" 
'Script-Kit Service" — a lending li- 
brary of scripts which is used by 99 




MEMBERS of a 'Bedside Network' team re- 
hearsing radio script with a veteran patient 
for a closed circuit program (I. to r.) pa- 
tient, Bill Weyse, WNBC writer-producer-di- 
rector, and Julie Christy, tv and stage actress 



ACTING as tape recorder 'engineers' on a 
'Bedside Network' location job are Terry 
Ross, senior sound effects artist of ABC, and 
Bud Collyer, m.c. of To Tell The Truth' 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 





PLANNING in new projects at 'Bedside 
Network' headquarters are Nancy Moore, 
actress, Dick Foorman, copywriter, William 
Esty, Douglas Parkirst, tv actor-writer, pres. 
VHRTG, and William Kaufman of NBC Sales 



VHRTG keeps a 'Scriptkit Library' of scripts, 
sound effects, music records for use in veter- 
ans hospitals shows. Below, CBS writer 
Elizabeth Pennell, and Nancy Moore, actress 





ONE-SHOTS CAN PUT REGIONAL 



^ BBDO brings them in for Schaefer, other clients, 
at $5,000 to $70,000 for one market, clears prime time 

^ Hour-long St. Patrick show, with only 20 seconds 
of commercials, beats out two nets in N. Y. showing 



local-level programing available to 
them did not meet their require- 
ments." (Foreman feels that with the 
exception of locally-produced news 
and weather franchises, much of the 
read\ -made programing within reach 
on a local or regional basis is not at- 
tractive to such advertisers.) 

Back in 1960 BBDO blanketed a. 
20-state sales area with a one-shot 
for Gamble-Skogmo. Inc.'s mid-West 
retail chain. That was a prime-time 
operation on 70 stations affiliated 
with one network or another. An- 
other multi-market special, particu- 
lars not yet for publication, is forth- 
coming from BBDO. 

In the case of Schaefer, Foreman 
describes an extremely competitive 
situation, especially in New York, 
with most of the battle being fought 
on tv. To gain notice you have to 



low does a regional or local tv 
advertiser, up against the glamor of 
network series and specials, manage 
to stand out ? 

BBDO tackles this problem for 
Schaefer beer and other clients by 
means of local specials. The agency 
develops the program idea, plays an 
extensive co-production role, nego- 
tiates for advantageous station slots, 
and promotes the way a network 
would within the markets covered. 
Production costs dip as low as $5,000 
for one market, which allows for the 
occasional splurge which can hit 
§70,000. 

BBDO executive v. p. -creative di- 
rector Bob Foreman sees the local 
special, with careful attention to 
quality, as a natural for "advertisers 
of pride and taste who may have 
shied from tv because the\ fell the 



do something different, points out 
Foreman, so Schaefer is supplement- 
ing its hefty tv schedule of sports- 
casts and announcements with these 
specials, on a frequent basis. 

Most recent of the Schaefer one- 
shots was "The Story of St. Patrick! 
presented in four markets on the eve 
of St. Patrick's Day. The hour-loifl 
show, narrated by actor Myron Mc- 
Cormick and illustrating the storj El 
means of filmed paintings and other 
works of art, ran in prime time over 
WNEW-TV. New York, and also wf 
aired in Boston, Philadelphia and 
Albam. 

Commercial material consisted "I 
three mentions that Schaefer was |'i'' 
senting the program— which took up 
about 20 seconds of the hour. It win 
assumed that this commercial re- 
straint, in keeping with the religious 
nature of the show, would be appflB- 
ciated by the viewers, maru of whom 
represent an important beer-drinking 
group, the Irish-American market. 

In New York the show's Nielsei 
average hit 12.7, nosing out two ol 
the network presentations that ran 
simultaneously . Other sources of 
satisfiaction for advertiser and agtffl 



11 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 







How Schaefer local specials were 
produced and placed in station lineups 

11 FEBRUARY— "Now . . . Nigeria," first of the Schaefer Circle of Special 
Programs, was filmed by independent producer William Alexander, with BBDO 
contributing some writing, structuring and basic editing. Scene from show 
(I) is from a Nigerian school. A time slot was opened by pre-empting Schae- 
fer's regular Saturday night musical variety show on WABC-TV, New York. 

16 MARCH— "The Story of St. Patrick," was seen on the eve of St. Patrick's 
Day over WNEW-TV, New York, and in Boston, Philadelphia, and Albany. For 
this hour-long film depicting the story via paintings and other works of art, 
BBDO was responsible for research, format, and introductory writing prior to 
turning the script assignment over to WNEW-TV's Mel Bailey. Scene (c) 
shows narrator Myron McCormick and St. Kill ian's boys choir. 

2 MAY (Tentative) — Willie Davis pictorial will show his early days in Califor- 
nia and current experiences as a Los Angeles Dodgers rookie in spring train- 
ing in Florida. Davis is shown in picture (I) with academy award winning 
cameraman, James Wong Howe, who is doing the filming. Project was 
assigned to producer David Wolper. Negotiations are on for four markets. 



CLIENTS IN THE TV LIMELIGHT 



|Cy were favorable reaction by the 
inewspaper tv critics and warm let- 
ters from viewers. Additional mile- 
age from the show, brought in for 
minimal production costs, is poten- 
tially endless since expectations are 
;it will develop into a perennial pres- 
entation. 

Foreman cautions that agencies 
earn their money "the hard way" 
when they build this kind of show. 
BBDO people originated the idea, 
did the research, developed the for- 
mat, and had the writing well under 
way before turning the project over 
[to Mel Bailey of WNEW-TV. He 
adds that agency and advertiser can 
^ake great pride in the quality of the 
jend product, as can the tv station 
that carries it. 

And, from a purely practical stand- 
point, these programs can be spread 
lover a number of areas and clients. 
BBDO plans to make its local spe- 
cials available to clients of the agen- 
c) s 18 branch offices throughout the 
U. S. wherever possible. 

While Schaefer 's local specials are 
designed to be of interest to as wide 
an audience as possible, especially 
among beer-drinking males, most of 



them still seem to have a little extra 
appeal for one important segment of 
the market. With the St. Patrick 
program, it was the Irish-American 
market, especially in New York and 
Boston. Some other Schaefer specials 
indicate to the trade that the brewer 
is making a special pitch to Negroes. 



Back in February Schaefer pre- 
sented "Now Nigeria" to New York 
over WABC-TV, preempting its own 
Saturday night variety show time 
slot (11-11:30 p.m.). BBDO relied 
on independent producer William 
Alexander, himself a Negro, to bring 
{Please turn to page 60) 



Why BBDO likes the local tv special 

BOB FOREMAN, executive v.p.-creative 
director, BBDO, strongly favors the spot 
special as a means for regional or local 
advertisers to stand out in their mar- 
kets against network and other com- 
petition on the tv screen. He points 
out it's a lot of work for the agency, but 
well worth it in terms of impact and 
achieving quality programing. Other- 
wise, according to Foreman, there's no 
ready-made one-shot program material 
and as for series, he feels that the advertiser of pride and taste is 
hard put to find what he wants among what is available at the 
local level beyond station-produced news and weather. 




'SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



45 









3 '500,000 onT 
■'000,000 



500,000 



on RADIO 
NSWSPapebs 







EXTRA OOMPH for Raggedy Ann spot tv drive comes from hefty 
in-store merchandising that includes shopping bags (I) with cut-outs 
of animated characters. Merchants also got Ip (r) describing drive 



Who's Raggedy Ann? Tv tells all 






^ Food marketer's brand awareness problem alleviated 
by spot tv lineup heavily merchandised at point of sale 

^ Phone survey shows number unaware of brand down 
75% after month; number in know more than doubles 



I oo many people in Chicago con- 
tinued to associate the term Raggedy 
Ann only with dolls after a number 
of years of outdoor and newspaper 
advertising by Raggedy Ann Foods, 
marketer of over 75 products. 

To boost brand awareness. Rag- 
gedy Ann last fall launched a heavily 
merchandised spot tv schedule on 
WBBM-TV, Chicago, its first entry 
into the medium. 

The animated spots, in a humorous 
vein, are spread over the station's 
Monday-Friday schedule. In-store 
merchandising material includes free 
shopping bags with a cut-out tv set 
and a strip of cartoon characters 
from the commercials which children 
can pull through the cut-out "screen" 
and thereby run their own commer- 
cials. The' bags have "WBBM-TV, 
CBS" printed on the sides. 



Those stores that sign up for the 
display program (over 500 have) re- 
ceive for a small fee window blow- 
ups of the "Special of the Week," 
which also is featured in each week's 
tv spots, plus bulls-eyes and "tv spe- 
cial shelf signs." In addition, a long- 
playing phonograph record describ- 
ing the entire campaign was made 
by WBBM-TV personality Lee Phillip 
and mailed to all retailers taking part. 

To test the effectiveness of this 
two-fold effort. Raggedy Ann ar- 
ranged a brand awareness telephone 
survey at its start and one month 
later. Among the findings: 

• Number of respondents unaware 
of Raggedy Ann as a brand name 
was down 75% (from 38 originally 
to 10 for the second surve) I 

• Concept of Raggedy Ann as 
only one product was almost elimi- 



nated (down from nine to one) 

• "Total of those cognizant of Rag- 
gedy Ann as a line of several food 
products more than doubled (up 
from 30 to 65) 

• Those who associate Raggedy 
Ann strictly with dolls, comic strip 
characters or storybooks were re- 
duced in number nearly 50% (from 
21 to 12) 

In assessing the results of the tv 
campaign and accompanying mer- 
chandising program Bill Olendorf, 
marketing v.p. of Raggedy Ann's 
agency, Tobias, 0'Neil & Gallay, had 
this to say: "The brand has been en- 
joying an increase in consumer 
awareness and movement that had 
never been achieved before when we 
were using just newspapers and bill 
boards." 

As for tangible sales results, field 
trips made to retailers during the 
campaign are reported to show that 
merchants who promote the "Special 
of the Week," featured in the t\ 
spots hike sales of the spot-lighted 
item by at least 300%. One store re- 
ported an increase of 2,000$ on the 
sale of a "Special" item. ^ 



46 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



TV BASICS /APRIL. 



Tv viewers are financially secure 



^ Income study of tv households based on top ten shows 
reveals high percentage reporting middle-upper incomes 



The wage bracket of most televi- 
sion households is between $4,000 
and $6,999. Slightly over half— 51', 
of all respondents — are within this 
income range. Ironically, the remain- 
ing 49'y are divided virtually equal- 
ly between brackets under and over 
this category. Twenty-four percent 
earn less than $4,000 and, as men- 
tioned previously. 25$ make more 
than $7,000. 



I ore than three-quarters of all 
tv's viewing homes have a gross an- 
nual income over $4,000, the Ameri- 
can Research Bureau indicates in a 
recent national report. 

Based on the top ten network pro- 
grams, a highly representative sam- 
ple, the survey shows that a high per- 
cent of these homes reported yearly 
earnings better than $7,000. This 
category represents 25 °/c . 



With the exception of the lowest 
and highest dollar categories, there's 
no extensive variation in the range 
of incomes viewing the various pro- 
grams falling into the Top 10 category. 
The highs and lows are as follows: 
A, 10-4%; B, 19-12%; C, 54-46%; 
D. 20-14%; E, 10-6%. 

The rank of the top ten by the per- 
cent of viewers earning more than 
$7,000 looks like this: 1) Untouch- 
ables; 2) Bob Hope; 3) Gunsmoke; 
3) Have Gun, Will Travel; 3) Perry 
Mason; 3) Rawhide; 7) Ed Sulli- 
van; 8) Chevy Show; 8) Wagon 
Train; 10) Real McCoys. ^ 



PERCENT OF HOMES VIEWING TOP TEN BY ANNUAL INCOME 



PROGRAM 



Under $2500 






WAGON TRAIN 


10% 


GUNSMOKE 


8 


BOB HOPE 


10 


CHEVY SHOW 


8 


HAVE GUN 


6 


PERRY MASON 


9 


ED SULLIVAN 


10 


UNTOUCHABLES 


4 


REAL McCOYS 


8 



B 

$2500-$3999 



RAWHIDE 



8 



17% 



15 



15 



18 



16 



15 



12 



19 



$4000 - $6999 



50% 



51 



48 



51 



52 



50 



46 



54 



18 



53 



$7000 - $9999 



16% 



16 



19 



14 



16 



16 



16 



20 



48 



14 



16 



$10,000 UP 



7% 



10 



10 



10 



10 



10 



16% 



51% 



16% 



9% 



| Average % 8% 

Source: American Research Bureau, Nov. 1960 

Ilium iiiiiiiuiiitiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i iiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiii i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin illinium imuuiii miiiiiumiii iiiiiiimiiiiiumiiiiiimin iminiii iiiimiiiiiiimiiiimmiiiiim imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

1. THIS MONTH IN NETWORK TV 

Specials scheduled during four weeks ending 7 May 



PROGRAM (NETWORK) 



COST SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 



Bell & Howell Close-Up! (A) 

Pat Boone Show (A) 

Bell Telephone Hour (N) 

Cry Vengeance (N) 

Face the Nation (C) 

Family Classics (C) 

Hall of Fame (N) 

Bob Hope Buick Show (N) 

John F. Kennedy #2 (N) 

Ernie Kovacs Show (A) 

Las Vegas Golf (N) 



\ 30,000 

225,000 

285,000 

50,000 

265,000 

275,000 

320,000 

40,000 

75,000 



Bell Howell, 4/18, 4/27 
4/20 

AT&T, Ayer, 4/14, 4/28 
Purex, Weiss, 4/18 
4/6 

Breck, R.,McC, 4/6 
Hallmark, FC&B, 5/5 
Buick, McCann, 4/12 
P&G, B&B, 4/11 
4/20 

Kemper, Wilson, Frank, 
Mithun, 5/7 



PROGRAM (NETWORK) 


COST 


SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 


Dean Martin Show (N) 


250,000 




The Million $ Incident (C) 




U. S. Time, 4/21 - 


NBC White Paper (N) 


50,000 


Timex Vi, Doner, 4/16 


Omnibus (N) 


120,000 


Aluminum, Thompson, 
4/16 


Oscar Awards (A) 


950,000 


4/17 


Our American Heritage (N) 


230,000 


Equitable, FC&B, 4/22 


Jane Powell Show (N) 


225,000 


Pepsi, BBD0, 4/28 


Purex Special (N) 


50,000 


Purex, Weiss. 4/13 


Sing Along With Mitch (N) 


40,000 


Ballantine, Esty, 4/21 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



47 




2. NIGHTTIME 



C O 




P A 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



I Love Lucy 

Clalrol (FCAB) 

Block Drug 

(3SCB) 



Meet The Press 

co-op 

II M.500 



ABC News 

•ust. 



ABC News 

lust 



AB( 



Walt Disney 

Presents 

Derby (McC-E) 

Gen Mill! 
Norwich (BAB) 

Dixie Cup 
(Hicks & Oreist) 
A- F 194, OM 



Twentieth 

Century 

Prudential 

(R-McC) 

D-F $35,000 



People Are 

Funny 

Squlbbs (Dont 

hue A Coe) 

Burlington Mills 
(II. $24,000 



No net service 



D. Edwards 

News 

Amer Home 

(BatM) 

N-L 39,500tt 



Huntley- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Texaco I CAW i 

ML $8,50(r" 



D. Edwards 

News 
Am. Home 

I Bales i 
Schlltr (JWT) 

ILL u.awtt 



Huntley- 
Brinkley Rep. 
Texaco (CAW) 

ILL maun 



Walt Disney 
Presents 

(6:80-7:30) 

Canada Dry 

(Ma thee) 

SlmonU (DFS) 

Campbell 
(X.L&B) Quaker 



Lassie 

Campbell Soup 

(BBDO) 

A-F $37,000 



Shirley Temple 

(7-8) 

Nabisco (Mc- 

Cann) 2/J 8 

B-Nut Ufa 

Savers (YAB) 

Dr-L $70,080 



Ne net service 



D. Edwards 

News 
Amer Home 
("meat BMttl 



Huntley- 
Brinkley Rep. 

Teiaoo 
'-rnnat read) 



Exa>editi«n 
Kalaten iOMIi 

a r $i*.eoe 



Ne net service 



D. Edwards 

News 
Am. Home 
alt SehllU 

t r a p aa l f aa ri ) 



Huntley- 
Brinkley Rep. 

Ten co 
(rapaal IsssaH 



Maverick 

(7:30-8:30) 
Kaiser Co ( YARI 
Noxema (88CB) 
Du Pont (Ayer) 
W-F $82.00( 



Dennis The 
Menace 

Kellogg (Burnett) 

Beat Foods 

(C1B&BI 

Be -F 836.000 



Shirley 
Temple 



Cheyenne 

(7 30-1:30) 
Mennen (Grey) 
Brlllo (.IWT) 
Pepsi (BBDO) 
Brls-My (OBM) 
W-F 887,000 



T* Tell The 

Truth! 

Am. Home (Balaa) 

B.J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

8eF 818.000 



The Americans 

Block 

(7:30-8:30) 

Dow (N.CAK) 

Max Factor, 



Bugs Bunny 
O. Fda. (BAB) 
Oelgate (Bataa) 



No net service 



Laramie 

(7:30-8:30) 

Am Oaa (LAN) 

Reynolds (Esty) 

QllleUe (Maxon) 

Gold Seal 

(C-MJthun) 

SL£ UftjiDA 



Hoi 

(7: 

Kali. 
Arm oi 

Brill 
A-F 



Maverick 

R.J. Reynolds 

(Eaty) 

Armour (FCAB1 



Ed Sullivan 

(8-9) 

Colcatt (Batea) 

alt Kodak (JWT) 

V-L 885.800 



National 
Velvet 

Rexall, G. Mill 

(BBDO) 
A-F 837. M0 



Cheyenne 
R. J. Reynolds 

(Eaty) 

PAG (BAB) 

Du Pont (Ayer) 



Pete and Cladys 
Goodyear (TAR) 

Carnation 

(MWRB) 
Sc-F 837.000 



The Americans 

Mead-Johnson 
(K&E) 



The Rifleman 

PAG (BAB) 

W-F 838.000 



Father Knows 
Best 

Scott ( ) 

Gen. Fds 

(OBM) 
Lever (BBI)O) 
W 834. U00 



Laramie 
B-Nut Lite Savers 

(YAR) : Pitt. 
Glass (BBDO) : 



Hoi 
Derby 
l/)rtlli 



Lawman 

R. J. Reynolds 

(Eaty) 

Whitehall 

(Bataa) 

W-F 841. 0OC 



Ed Sullivan 



Tab Hunter 

P. Lorlllard 

(LAN) Weet- 

clox (BBDO) 

Dr-L 838.000 



Surfside 6 

(8:80-9:30) 

Bm A Wmsn 

(Bataa) 

Pontile 
(MaeMJAA) 
JAJ (TAB) 
A-F 887.600 



Bringing Up 

Buddy 

Scott (JWT) 

Sc-F 835.000 



Welti Fargo 

Amer Tobacco 

B-Nut 

(S8CB) 
W-F 847.MO 



Wyatt Earp 
Gea Mllli (DF8) 
alt FAO 
(Caaatao) 
W-F 840.000 



Dobie Cillis 

Plllabury 

(Burnett) 

alt 

Philip Morris 

(Burnett) 
te-F 837.800 



Alfred 

Hitchcock 

Fard (JWT) 

Bevlon (Grey) 

My-F 805.000 



Dixie 

Koda, 
Co 

(» 

rJc-F 



The Rebel 
PAG (TAR) 
LAM (D.F.S.) 
| W-F 841.5041 



C. E. Theatre 

Gen Electric 

(BBDO) 

Dr-F 851.000 



The Chevy 

Show 

<lt/» S) 

(9-10) 

Chevrolet 

(Carap-E) 

VI. 8120. 04 



Surfside 6 

Whitehall 
(Bates) 



Danny Thomas 
Sao. Fda. (BAB) 
Sc-F $47,500 



Acapulco 

(L 4/24) 
R. J. Reynold 

(Eaty) 

(Vamer-Lambertt 

A-F $85,000 



Stagecoach 
West 

(•-10) 
B A W (Eaty) 

Miles (Wade) 
W-F $88,000 



Tom Ewell 

Qua ker O ata 

(JWT) 

PAG (Burnett) 

JcF 838.000 



Thriller (9-10) 
AH State (Bur- 
nett) ; Glenbrook 
(DFS); Am. 
H. Curtis 
(K&E) 
Heed Johnson 
<K*E> 



Haw. 

18:! 
Carte 
[ieechi 
W 
Mt-F 
Corn 1 



Asphalt Jungle 
LAM (Mc-B). 
I'nlon Carbide 

(Esty) 
Cluett Peabody 

(LAN) 
A-F $84,000 



Jack Benny 

Lever (BSCAB) 

State Farm 

(NUB) 
VI. $80,500 



The Chevy 
Show 



Adv. In Paradise 

(0:80- 10:80) 

Naxzoma(SSCAB) 

Mennen (Grey) 

Union Carbide 

A-F $92,900 



Andy Criffith 
Gaa Faods 

(BAB) 
Mu-L $47,500 



Dante 

8. Culver (Wada) 

Singer (TAR) 

My-F $37,000 

Concentration 

(4/17 S) 

P. Lorlllard 

(L&N) 



Stagecoach 
West 

Gen. Fda (OBM) 
lalstan (Gardner) 
Slmonlz (DFS) 
Dinette (Maxon) 



Red Skelton 
Show 

B. C. Johnson 

(F.CAB) 
: F $54,000 



Thriller 

B-Nut Ufa 

Savers (TAR) 

Tobacco (8SCB) 

((My-F $85,000 



Haw 

Am 

( 

xriHi 

Lever 



Asphalt 

Jungle 

Bpetdel (CM-E 

Prod.) 

Beecham (K&K) 

Pepsi BBDO) 



Candid Camera 

Lever (JWT) 

Brlstol-Myan 

(TAR) 

AuP-L $34,000 



Loretta Young 

Tool (North) 
lit Warner Lam 
(Laxa A Faaaley) 
Dr-L 148.800 

NBC White 
Paper #5 • 
(10-11; Apr. IS) 



Adv. In Paradise 
LAM (MrO-E) 
J. B. Williams 

(Parkaon) 
Whitehall, Am. 
Chicle (Bates) 



Hennesey 

Lorlllard (LAN) 

O. Fda (TAR) 

Sc-F $39,000 



Barbara 
Stanwyck 
Theatre 

l. Culver (Wada) 
Amer. Gaa Co. 

(LAN) 
Dr-F $41,000 



Alcoa Presents 

Aleea (FBB) 
Dr-F 838.000 

Close Up' • 
(10-10:30; 4/18) 



Carry Moore 
Show 
(10-11) 

'I y mouth (Aver) 
S. C. Johnson 

(NLAB) 
elarold (DDB) 
-L $115.000 



NBC Specials 

(10-11) 
Various sponsors 



Nit 

( 

lerby 

JuPoi 

ll 

(Tt 

lly-F 



Winston what'. Mv Line 

Churchill's Th« What_s__My Line 



Valiant Years 

Ed. Dslton 

(KAE) 

I Dr. $50,000 



Kellogg 

All-State 

(Burnett) 

Q-L $32,000 



This Is Your 

Life 

Block (Gray) 

&uP-L $24,000 



Peter Cunn 
Bristol-Myers 
(DOBS), R. J. 
Reynolds (Esty) 
My-F $39,000 
Oscar Awards 
(10:30-12; 4/17) 
• 



June Allyson 

Show 

Dupont (BBDO) 



'Jo Net Service 



No Net Service 



Carry Moore 
Show 



NBC Specials 



Nal 
Br' 

Tlrn 

w.l 



am Special*. 

ttOeart la per segment. Pricei do not include sustaining, partieipat- 
Lng ear co-op programs. Costa refer to average show coats including 
talemt and production. They are gross (include 15% agency commission). 



They do not include commercial* or time charges. This chart covers 
10 April-7 May. Program types are indicated as follows: (A) Adv 
(An) Audience Partieipatien, (C) Comedy, (D) Documentary, 



perio> 

enture 

(Dr 



48 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



iGRAP 




10 APR. - 7 MAY 



INESDAY 

• NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 








ABC News 

sust 






ABC News 

sust 






I | 








































D. Edwards 

News 

PhlUp Morris 

(Burnett) 

alt Schlltz 

(JWT) 

N-L $9.500tt 


D. Edwards 

News 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

alt Amer. Home 

(Bates) 
N-L $S.50Ott 




irds 

t 

Bates) 
Batei) 
'.SdPtt 




Huntley- 
Brinkley Rep. 
Teiaco (C&vt i 


Huntley- 
Brinkley Rep. 
Texaco (C&W) 
<J-L tft.lSOfttt 


Huntley- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Texaco (C&W) 

N-L $6.500tt 




•rvice 






No net service 






No net service 


No net service 










irds 

s 
ome 

ter 

mil ... 


D. Edwards 

News 
Philip Morris 

alt Schlltz 


D. Edwards 
News 

Parliament 
alt Amer. Borne 




Huntley- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Texaco 


Huntley- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Texaco 


Huntley- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Texaco 




Run 

130) 
&B) 
gates) 
UN) 

■M) 
1*7,000 


Wagon Train 

(7:30-8:30) 
Revlon (Grey) 
W-F S88.00C 


Cuestward Ho! 

Raliton (OB&B, 

Gardner) 

7-TJp (JWT) 

Sc-F $38,000 


Ann Sothern 
S. C. Johnson 

(B&B) 
Gen. Fds. 

(B&B) 


The Outlaws 
B&W. Plllsbury 

(C-Mlthun) ; 
W-F $88,000 


Matty's Funday 
Funnies 

Mattel 
(Carson Roberts) 
Sc-F $10.00« 


Rawhide 

(7:30-8:301 
G. Fds (B&B) 
DTaeket (T&R) 
P. Morris (B&B) 
B-Myers (T&R) 
Colgate (L&N) 
W-F $80,000 


Happy 
B&W (K.M&J) 

C-F $28,000 


The Roaring 20's 

7:30-8:30) 

Gillette (Maxon) 

CornPdts (L&N) 

B&W (Bates) 

W. -Lambert 

My-F $83,000 


Perry Mason 

(7:30-8:30) 

Colgate (Bates) 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

My-F $80,000 


bonanza 

(7 30-8:30) 

P&G (B&B) 

W-F $78,000 




Run 
Ml 

)) 

^yer) 


Wagon Train 

B. J. Reynold! 

(Bity) 

Nat'l Blie. 

(Me-E) 


Donna Reed 
Campbell 
(BBDO) 

alt 

Johnson & J 

(T&R) 

Sc-F $40,000 


Angel 

(L 4/13) 

S. C. Johnson 

(B&B) 

Gen. Fds. 

(B&B) 

B. Myers, Top 

Value 


The Outlaws 

B-Nut Life Savers 

(T&R) ;War-L«m 

(L&F); Coif at* 

(Bates) 


Harrigan & Son 
Reynolds (Frank) 
CC-F $39.00(1 


Rawhide 
Nabisco (Mc-E) 


5 Star Jubilee 

Massey-Ferguson 

(N.L.B) 

Whispering 

Smith 

(5/12 S) 

Mead-Johnson 

(K&E) 


The Roaring 

20's 

Derby (Mc-E) 

Am. Chicle 

(Bates) 

Beecham (K&E) 

Simonize 

(D-F-IS) 


Perry Mason 
Sterling (DFS) 
Dracket (T&R) 
Moores (B&B) 


Bonanza 

segs open 

RCA (JWT) 

Am. Tob. (BBDO) 




1— 

•Alive 

ro&B) 

UtM) 

(39.000 
Man 

E 


Price Is Right 
Lever (OBM) 

Q-L tn.soo 


The Real 

McCoys 

P&G (Conptoa) 

Sc-F $41,000 

Pat Boone 

Show 
(8:30-9:30; 
4/20) a) 


Zane Crey 

Theatre 

S. C. Johnson 

(BAB) P. Lorll- 

lard (L&N) 
W-F $45,000 


Bat Masterson 

(9/29 S) 
Sealtest (Aver) 
W-F $39,000 


Flintstones 
Miles (Wade) 

alt 
R. J. Reynold! 

(Eety) 
CC-F $44.<HM1 


Route 66 

(8:30-9:30) 

Chevrolet (C-E) 

Sterling (DFS) 

PhlUp Morris 

(Burnett) 

A-F $85,000 


Westii ghouse 
Pins. 

(McCann) 

Hall of Fame 

(8:30-10; 5/5)0 

5 Star Jubilee 

(5/12 S 


Leave It To 
Beaver 

Ralston (Gardner, 
GB&B) 

Colgate (Bates) 
Sc-F $30,000 


Checkmate 

(8:30-9:30) 

Bm. & Wmsn. 

(Bates) 

alt. K. Clark 

(F.C&B) 

My-F $80,000 


Tall Man 
R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) ; 

Block (SSCB) 

W-F SSt.tOfl 




1 

B&B) 

Pds. 


Perry Como 

Kraft (JWT) 

v~-I. 1125.000 

Buick Show 
(9-10; 4/12) 


My Three Sons 
Chevrolet (C-E) 
Se-F $49,500 


Cunslinger 

9-10 p.m. 
Lever (BBDO) 
W-F $87,000 
Family Classics 

(9-10; 4/27) f) 


iachelor Father 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

alt Am Tob 

(Gumblnner) 

9c-F $38,000 


77 Sunset Strip 

(9-10) 

Am. Chicle 

(Bates) 

My-F $85,000 


Route 66 

The Million 

Dollar Incident 

(8:30-10; 4/21) 

• 


Bell Telephone 

Hour (9-10) 

AT&T(NW Ayer) 

V-L $175,000 

Sing-Mitch # 

(9-10; 4/21) 

Lawless Years 

(5/12 S) 


Lawrence Welk 

(9-10) 

Dodge (Grant) 

J. B. Williams 

(Parkson) 

Mu-L $45,000 


Checkmate 

Brn. & Wmsn. 

(Bates) alt 

Lever (K&E) 


The Deputy 

Bristol-Myers 

(T&R) 

Gen. Otg. (T&R) 

W-F $39,000 




t a 

ft 

Esty) 

'yen 

■) 

*7.0O0 


Perry Como 


Untouchables 

(9:30-10:30) 

Armour (FCB) 

L&M (Mc-E) 

Corn Pdts (L&N) 

My-F $90,000 


Cunslinger 
R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 
Sillette (Maxon) 


Tennessee Ernie 
Ford Show 
Ford (JWT) 

r-L $45,000 


77 Sunset Strip 

R J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

Whitehall 

(Rates) 

Beecham (K&E) 


Way Out 

L&M (DFS) 

A-F $37,000 


Bell Telephone 

Hour 

Westinghouse 

Plhs. (5/12 S) 

Westinghouse 

(McCann) 


Lawrence Welk 


Have Cun. Will 

Travel 
Whall (Bates) 
all Lever (JWT) 
W-F $40,000 


The Nation's 

Future 
Our American 

Heritage # 
(9:30-10; 4/22) 




l\ Hr 
(0-11) 

eel 

» 

SO. 000 

r 


Peter Loves Mary 

P&G (B&B) 
S<-P 138.000 


Untouchables 
(Vhitehall (Bates) 
Beecham IKtE) 


CBS Reports 

alt 

Face the 

Nation 

(10-10:30; 4/6) 

• 


Croucho 
Marx 

Block (SSC&B) 

Tonl (North) 
AuP-L $30,000 


Robert Taylor 

in The 

Detectives 

P&G 

(B&B) 

My-F $45,000 


Twilight Zone 

L&M (McCann) 
Collate (McC) 
A-F $36,000 


Michael Shayne 

(10 11) 

Oldsmohlle 

Brother 

My-F $78,000 

Jane Powell 
(10-11; 4/28) 4J 


Fight-Week 
Gillette (Maxon) 

Miles (Wade) 
Sp-L $45,000 


Cunsmoke 

L&M (DFS) alt 

Sperry-Rand 

(T&R) 

W-F $42,000 






teatre 
(0-11) 

itng 
» 
«0.»00 


No net service 


Silents Please 

Dutch Masters 
Camp. Quaker 
Dr-F $45,000 
Ernie Kovacs*) 
(10:30-11; 4/20) 
Close-Upt • 
(10:30-11; 4/27) 


CBS Report 

alt 

No Net Service 




Law & Mr. 

Jones 
P&G (B&B) 

Lorillard (Grey) 
Simoniz (DFS) 
A-F $41,000 


Eyewitness to 
History 

Firestone 

(C-E) 

P.A $25,000 


Michael Shayne 
(Brother) Max 
Factor (K&E) 

xrillarJ (L&N) 
Dow (NCC) 


Make That 

Spare 

Brn. & Wmia. 

(Bates) 
Gillette (Maxon) 


No net lervice 


Man From 

Interpole 

Sterling (DFS) 

A-F $25,000 





?™ m \ ( p ) Film. (I) Interview, (J) Juvenile, (L) Live. (M) Mi»c. 
Ma) Musie, (My) Mystery, (N) News, (Q) Quiz-Panel, (Sc) Situation 
^medy, (Sp) Sports, (V) Variety, (W) Western. tNo charge for repeats. 



L preceding date means last date on air. S following date means starting 
date for new show or sponsor in time slot. tPrice not available. 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



49 



". . a total commitment 
designed to 
enslave a total world" 




Jefferson Standab 



CMARLCS M.CBUTCMriELO 

IXCCUTlVC Vict PftCS.OCNf 

AMD wCNCRAl MANAOIR 



O 



HOAUC AST1NCI COMPANY 



CHARLOTTE O. NORTH CAAOviNA 



March 10, 1961 



Mr. Norman R. Glenn 

Editor & Publisher 

SPONSOR 

40 East 49th Street 

New York 17, New York 

Dear Norman: 

Enclosed Is an exact copy of a letter which a young Communist 
sent to a friend of his back in the United States. 

The letter appeared in "Presbyterian Survey" - - a very fine 
publication of the Presbyterian Church. In reproducing it, 
the editor made one of the most profound and thought-provok- 
ing observations I've ever read. He said, "We think this 
letter shows more graphically than any editorial what total 
commitment means." He went on to say, "Are we as committed 
to the truth as this young Communist and millions like him 
are committed to an empty hope?" 

To a great majority of people in the Free World, particularly 
people in America, this kind of dedication is unheard of. 
They simply cannot believe that the architects of Communism, 
Karl Marx, Lenin, et al, could possibly have such influence 
on any human being. I feel that to defend and protect free- 
dom as we know it today, it is imperative that all people in 
the Free World understand the inner feelings of those who are 
determined to destroy it. I am hopeful, therefore, that you 
- - through your widely read publications - - will give the 
enclosed letter as much publicity as you see fit. 

We simply must convince Americans and as many of our friends 
in the Free World as possible that Communism is by no means 

just another political party. It is a form of religion 

a complete dedication a total commitment designed to 

enslave a total world. 



Sincerely yours, . 



yOUng COmmiinist WriteS . . . "What seems of first importance to you is to 
le either not desirable or impossible of realization. But there is one thing about which I 
m in dead earnest — and that is the socialist cause. It is my life, my business, my religion, 
ly hobby, my sweetheart, wife, and mistress, my bread and meat. I work at it in the day- 
me and dream of it at night. Its hold on me grows, not lessens, as time goes on. I'll be in 
the rest of my life. It is my alter-ego. When you think of me, it is necessary to think of 
ocialism as well, because I'm inseparably bound to it. 

Therefore, I can't carry on a friendship, a love affair, or even a conversation without relat- 
ig it to this force which both drives and guides my life. I evaluate people, books, ideas, 
nd notions according to how they affect the socialist cause and by their attitude toward it. 

have already been in jail because of my idaas, and if necessary I am ready to go before 
firing squad. A certain percentage of us get killed or imprisoned. Even for those who 
scape these harsher ends, life is no bed of roses. A genuine radical lives in virtual pov- 
erty. He turns back to the party every penny he makes above what is absolutely necessary 
i keep him alive. We constantly look for places where the class struggle is the sharpest, 
(plotting these situations to the limit of their possibilities. We lead strikes. We organize 
smonstrations. We speak on street corners. We fight cops. We go through trying experi- 
ices many times each year which the ordinary man has to face only once or twice in a 
fetime. 

\nd when we're not doing these more exciting things, all our spare time is taken up with 
jII routine chores, endless leg work, errands, etc., which are inescapably connected with 
inning a live organization. 

Radicals don't have the time or the money for many movies or concerts or T-bone steaks or 
ecent homes and new cars. We've been described at fanatics. We are. Our lives are 
aminated by one great, over-shadowing factor— the struggle for socialism. Well, that's 
hat my life is going to be. That's the black side of it. Then there is the other side of it. 
e Communists have a philosophy of life which no amount of money could buy. We have 
cause to fight for, a definite purpose in life. We subordinate our petty personal selves 
ito a great movement of humanity. We have a morale, an esprit de corps such as no 
ipitalist army ever had; we have a code of conduct, a way of life, a devotion to our cause 
tat no religious order can touch. And we are guided not by blind, fanatical faith but by 
igic and reason, by a never-ending education of study and practice. 

And if our personal lives seem hard or our egos appear to suffer through subordination 
i the party, then we are adequately compensated by the thought that each of us is in his 
nail way helping to contribute something new and true, something better to mankind." 



reprinted from the 
PRESBYTERIAN SURVEY 

A SERVICE OF SPONSOR 




1ZZ 



^ 



<r 



DAYTIME 



C O 




P A 



ABC 



SUNDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



MONDAY 

ABCt CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABCt CBS 



NBC 



. 



Lamp Unto M i 
Feet 

SUSt 



Sponsors 

A. K Staley 

Armour: niork 

B n Ami ; 

Itai.bitt 



I Love Lucy 
Kellogg 

1'lun) 



Say When 

Sterling alt lust 



Sponsors 
lirillo; Carter"! 

Little Pills: 
B. Myers; Better 
Vision; Ki Lai; 



I Love Lucy 

Lever 
Lipt/m (HP) 
Kellogg (RP) 
French (RP) 



Say When 

sust 



Si 

Genei 
Put 
Pcp| 



Look Up & Liv > 
suit 



liv .M.nt. Tinlal 
cont'd Tues. 



Video Village 

S. C. Johnson 

alt Lever 



Play Your 

Hunch 

sust 

alt 



Colgate 



Filbert; ch. 

Ponds; Campana 

Corn Pots. Cal- 

gon, Prlto. 

i rand 



Video Village 
S. C. Johnson 

tm. Home Pdts. 
alt sust 



Play-Hunch 
sust alt 
Colgate 

Sterling alt 
SlmonU 



llartx; 
Johns 
conl 



UN in Action 
sust 



Morning Court 



Double 

Exposure 

S. C. Johnsor 



Price It Right 

sust. 

Sterling 
alt 



Morning Court 



Double 

Exposure 

sust 



S. O. Johnson 



Price Is Right 

sus t alt. B-N ut 

sust alt Lever 



Morn 



Camera Threi 
sust 



Love That Bob 



Surprise 

Package 

sust 



Concentration 

Culver alt 

Lever 



SP 

sust 



Love That Bob 



Wennen alt Mile 



S. C. Johnson 
Vlck alt. suit 



Concentration 

Frlgldalre 
alt sust 



A. Culver 
alt Learning 



Love 



Meet the 
Professor 



Wash Conver 
sation 

sust 



Camouflage 



Love of Life 

•ust 

Amer Home Pro I 

alt sust 



Truth or 
Consequences 

Miles alt sust 



Camouflage 



Love of Life 

•ust alt. Quaker 

OaU 

Am. Home 

(»kly) 



Truth or 
Consequences 
N abisco B-N -it 

Culver alt 
Colgate 



Car 



The Piper 

Gen Mills 



Accent 



Number Please 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

PAD 



It Could Be Yot 
Culver alt sust 



Number Please 



Search For 

Tomorrow 

PAO 



It Could Be You 

sust 



Cuiding Light 
PAO 



News (12:55-1 
Gen. Mllli 



Cuiding Light 
PAO 



TAG 
News 02:55-1) 



Numl 



Direction 61 
sust 



About Faces 



Midday Report 



News 

(1-1:05) 

rast 



No net service 



About Faces 



Midday Report 



News 

(1-1:09) 

rait 



No net service 



No net service 



Abo 

Midd 



Frontiers of 
Faith 
•uit 



World Turns 

PM 

Llptom alt 

H. Curtis 



No net service 



World Turns 

PAO 

Sterling alt 

Quaker 



No net service 



Scv 



Major League 

Baseball 

(to concl. } 

(4/16 S) 



Seven Keys 



Face the Fact 
sust 



|an Murray 
Show 
•ust 

sust alt Whltehal 



Seven Keys 



Face the Facts 

Lever (L 3/28) 



■ust 



Jan Murray 
Show 

Slid alt sust 

Tonl alt sust 



Scv 



Art Linktetter 

Chicken of the 

Sea alt 
J. B. Willia ms 

Kellogg 



Baseball Came 

of the Week 

(4/16 S) 

(Part.) 



A, Busch 'i rcg 
Sohlltz Vt reg. 

Mllll 1 
Major League 
Baseball 



Seven Keys 



Art Linkletter 

Wlms. alt sust 



Loretta Young 

sust alt B-Nut 



Williams alt 
S. C. Johnson 



P&G alt sust 



Seven Keys 



Loretta Young 

Miles alt sust 
Borax alt sust 



Scv 



To- 



Malone 

■ust 

Glenbrook alt 

PAG 



Baseball 



Major League 
Baseball 



Queen For a 
Day 



Millionaire 
Johnson alt su 



Nestle alt sust 



Young Dr. 
Malone 

P&G alt sust 



Queen For a 
Day 



Millionaire 

Lever alt sust 



Qur 



Quaker alt sust 



Baseball 



Major League 

Baseball Who You Trust 



verdict is Your 

S. G. Johnson 

alt sust 



From These 
Roots 

sust 

alt Silcx 



Who You Trust? 



Tonl alt B&B 



/erdict Is Yours 



From These 
Roots 

FHto 
alt Slmonlze 



Who 



Lever 



Roundup U.S./ 



Baseball 



Major League 
Baseball 



American 

Bandstand 

Strldex 



Brighter Day 

Lever alt sust 

Secret Storm 

Amer Home Pro 



Make Room For 
Daddy 

sust 



American 
Bandstand 

Strldex; B-Nut; 

Gillette. Food 

Man. 



Brighter Day 



Secret Storm 
Quaker 
alt lust 



Make Room For 
Daddy 

sust 



PAG 



Am 
B N 

w. 



Issues & 
Answers 



Baseball 



Amer. Band. 
Int. Shi 
asll, 9i 
Lambert, N. 

Warren 



Edge of Night 
PAG 

H Curtis alt 
Virk 



Watty's Funda 

Funnies 

Mattel 



Amateur Houi 
Williams 

N. Y. 



Las Vegas 
Coif 

Omnibus 

1/16) 



American 

Bandstand 

•o-op 



Rocky & 

Friends 

G Mills. Am 

Chicle. P. Pau 



College Bowl 
GE 



Chet Huntley 
Reporting 

Mutual of Oman 



Rin Tin Tin 

Gen. Mills. 

Sweet* 



Here's Hlywd. 

Simnniz 

alt Campana 

Colgate 

alt Jergens 



Amer. Band. 

MAM; Lever; 

Tonl; Noxema; 

Goodrich 



Edge of Night 

PAG 

Sterling 

lit R. T. French 



Here's 
Hollywood 

Whitehall alt 
sust 
Colg. 



Am 
W 

C.ile 



American 

Bandstand 

ee-oo 



Rocky & Friends 
Gen. Mills. 

Goodrich 

C.en. Foods 

Sweet* 



Lor 

• ;• 



tNote: ABC Mon.Fri. daytime sponsors rotate on a weekly basis and are not regularly scheduled for any particular shows or time periods. Alphabet 

HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S The network schedule on this and preceding pages (48, 4,9 

NFTWORK TFI FVimnN includes regularly scheduled programing from 10 Api 

COMPARAGRAPH 



7 May, inclusive (with possible exception of chang' 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly sche 1 



i 



G R A P 




lO APR. - 7 MAY 



NESDAY 

NBC 



MB 

ucy 

tP) 
P) 



THURSDAY 

ABCt CBS NBC 



To 



ABCt 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Natl. Biscuit 

Remco, Am Doll 

Cracker Jack, 

Pruwitt 
Baker's Choc, 



rsp- 

it 

ison 
5. T. 



Say When 
sust 



Sponsors 
Minute Maid 

Lehn & Fink; 

Northahwaren 
Morton; Old Lon 



: M&M: Alys 
tic Tape Minn 
Mining 
cont'd Fri. 



i Love Lucy 

Lever (Itl'i 
Eastman (HP) 

French (Rl>) 
Kellogg (HP) 



Say When 

sust all Bon 
Ami 



String 



Sponsors 

Sterling Drug 

Welch 

Uncle lien's 

Whitehall 



I Love Lucy 

Lever 
Bon Ami (RP) 
Kellogg (HP) 
French (RP) 



Say When 
B-Nut alt sust 



Captain 
Kangaroo 



Play-Hunch 
Frito alt Sweet 



Colgate 



Video Village 

R. T. French 

Alt Best Foods 

Borax alt AHP 



Play Your 

Hunch 

Colgate alt 

Nabisco 

Miles all Heinz 



END 



Video Village 
S. C. Johnson 



Play-Hunch 

sust alt. 
Colgate 

Colgate 



(ing Leonard 

Short Subjects 

Gen. Mills, 

Sweets 



Price Is Right 

Sterling alt susl 
Heinz alt Culver 



Morning Court 



Double 
Exposure 

Best Fds. alt 

S. C. Johnson 



Price Is Right 

Silex (4/13- 

5/25) alt Gold 

Seal 

Miles 



Morning Court 



Double 
Exposure 

sust alt 
S. O. Johnson 
S. C. Johnson alt 



Price Is Right 

Lever alt sust 

Culver alt Ton! 



Kellogg Magic 

Land of 

Allakazam 



Fury 

Miles Nabisco, 
Sweets 



Concentration 

Lever alt Gen. 

Mills 

Nablico alt 

Jergens 



Love That Bob 



SP 

sust 



S. C. Johnson 
alt Borax 



Concentration 
G. Mills 
alt Lever 
Heinz alt 
Whitehall 



Love That Bob 



SP 

sust 



Concentration 

Lever 



sust 
Lever alt sust 



Simoniz alt 
Miles 



Roy Rogers 

Nestle 



Lone Ranger 
Gen. Mills. 



Life 
Prod 



Truth or 
Consequences 

Heinz sust 



Camouflage 



Love of Life 

B. T. French 
alt sust 



Truth or 
Consequences 

sust 



Camouflage 



Love of Life 

Borax alt sust 



sust alt 
Nabisco 



Truth or 
Consequences 

Frig, alt sust 



Sky King 

Nabisco 



P&G alt 
Whitehall 



My True Story 
Glenbrook 

Dow alt Simoniz 



or 



Could Be You 

Whitehall 



Heinz alt TonI 



Number Please 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

PAG 



It Could Be You 
Mile* alt Nabisco 



ight 



News (12:55-1) 
G. Mills 



Cuiding Light 
PAG 



P&Q 

J>lews (12:55-1) 
Q. Mills 



Number Please 



Search for 
Tomorrow 

P&Q 

Guiding Light 
P&Q 



Could Be You 

?ampana alt sust 

P&G alt sust 



Pip the Piper 
Gen. Mills 



Jews (12:55-1) 
ft M '"» 



Mighty Mouse 
Plhs. 

sust 

Colgate alt sust 



)etective Diary 

Glenbrook 
alt sust 
Simoniz 



No net service 



About Faces 



News 

(1-1:05) SUSt 



About Faces 



Midday Report 



No net service 



No net service 



Midday 
Report 



News 

(1-1:05) 

lust 



No net service 



No net service 



CBS News 
sust 



Mr. Wizard 
suit 



No net service 



Seven Keys 



As the World 

Turns 

P&G 

Plllaburj 



No net service 



Seven Keys 



World Turns 

Best Food! 

Carnation alt 

R. T. French 



No net service 



Ian Murray 
Show 

Borax alt sust 

(4/6- 

sust 



: acts 



|an Murray 

Show 

sust 

R. Digest alt 

Colgate 



Seven Keys 



Face the Facts 

Best Fds. alt 

Lever 



Bon Ami 
6/1) alt 



Seven Keys 



Face the Facts 

sust 

Best Food! 



Jan Murray 
Show 

Whtehl alt. sust 



Major League 
Baseball 

(to concl.) 
(4/15 S) 



Lorefta Young 
aust 

Frigidaire 



Seven Keys 



Art Linkletter 
i.ever alt Drackett 



Plllsbury 



Loretta Young 

P&G alt sust 



Seven Keys 



Art Linkletter 
Lever Broa 



Loretta Young 

Frito 
alt G. Mills 



Baseball Came 
of the Week 



Heinz alt P&G 



»&G alt G. Mills 



jen. Insurance 
(Regional) 
i alt. Suns. 

\. Busch % reg. 
Mills 1 min. 



Millionaire 

Quaker alt 
R. T. French 



TOW!" 

Dr. Malonr 
Mennen alt sust 



re 
ison 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

Plough. G. Mills 



Heinz 
Lever (4/12 S) 



Queen For a 
Day 



Millionaire 

Kodak 

Drackett alt 

Best Fds. 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

Miles alt Culver 

P&G alt G. Mis 



Queen For a 
Day 



Gerber alt. Nab 



Glenbrook alt 
Jergens 



Baseball 



Major League 
Baseball 



^ours 
alt 



From These 

Roots 

Purex (L 5/3) 

a lt Q. Mil ls 

Nabisco 



Who You Trust? 



Verdict Is Yours 

Sterling alt Lever 

S. C. Johnson 
alt R. T. French 



From These 
Roots 

Simnz alt. Heinz 



Who You Trust? 



Verdict Is Yours 

Quaker Oats 
alt S. C. Johnson 



Purex; Dow alt 
Purex 



From These 

Roott 

Colgate alt 

Borax 

Sweets alt B-Nut 



Baseball 



Major League 
Baseball 



iDay 



Make Koom tor 
Daddy 



>rm 
Prod 



Heinz 
alt sust 



Amer. Band. 

B-Nut, Welch, 
Lehn & Fink. 
Gillette, Lever, 
Ctrer's Lambert 



Brighter 1 Day 

Drackett Borax 



Secret Storm 
A. Home alt 
R. T. French 



Make Room For 
Daddy 

sust alt Frito 



sust alt 
Frigidaire 



Amer. Band. 
Welch. Lever. 
Toni. Noxema. 
Gillette Carter 



Brigrirer uav 

Lever alt Best 
Fds. 

Secret Storm 

Am. Home alt 



Make Room For 
Daddy 



Baseball 



Major League 
Baseball 



sust alt Culver 



ight 
alt 



Here's 
Hollywood 

Gold Seal alt 

Jergens 

Culver alt Toni 



Ame. Band. 
Toni, Strldex 
Northam War- 
ren, Minn. Min 
ing, Goodrich, 



Edge of Night 

P&Q 

Plllabury 



HerVs 
Hollywood 

B-Nut alt G. Mis 



neinz alt 
Whitehall 



Amer. Band. 

B-Nut. Tnt'l 
Shoe, Block 



Edge of Night 
Quaker Oats 
alt. Dracket 



Amer Home alt 
Sterling 



Here's 
Hollywood 
G. Mis alt. 

Simoniz 
Dow alt Colgate 



Baseball 



Major League 
Baseball 



mm s r a r urn 

(L 4/22) 

Reynolds Metals 

Armour 

Gen. Mills 



American 

Bandstand 

eo-op 



Purex Soecial 

(4-5; 4/13) • 



American 
Bandstand 

co-op 



Bowling Stars 

(4/8-5/6) 
Cen. Mills % 



Rocky and 

His Friend; 

Gen. Mills. 

Sweets 



Rin Tin Tin 

Gen Mills 

Goodrich, Gen. 

Foods 



laptain Gallant 

alt. G. Mills 



S of accounts begins 10 a.m. Monday and concludes 10 a.m. Friday. *These are package prices and include time, talent, production and cable costs. 



ijsd programs appearing during this period are listed 
i well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 
jams not listed are: Jack Paar, NBC, 11:15 p.m.-l a.m., 
[jOnday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday News 



Special, CBS, Sunday, 11-11:15 p.m.; Today, NBC, 7-9 
a.m., Monday-Friday, participating; News CBS, 7:45-8 a.m., 
8 :45-9 a.m., Monday-Friday and Today on the Farm, NBC, 
7-7:30 a.m., Sat. All time periods are Eastern Standard. 



With musical tastes widening, SPONSOR ASKS: 



What's the next trend 

in pop music? 




Stephen H. Sholes, RCA Victor man- 
ager, Artist & Repertoire, popular records, 
\ eta ) ork 

Predicting the next trend in Pop 
Musk- is like predicting the Stock 
Market. If you're right, you're hailed 
as a wizard. If you're wrong, you 
ain't nuthin" hut a hound dog. 

Crystal-balling is all but passe in 
the recording industry today. 

Some basic reasons for the de-em- 
phasis of "calculated guess-work" 



Trend is to a 
keener pursuit 
of the possibil- 
ities in all musi- 
cal areas 



are: A rapidk broadening musical 
taste in America, the tremendous 
growth of an international market, 
and the drop in the age level of the 
average pop disk consumer to that 
between eight and 14 years old. 

A more varied musical product is 
an absolute must. 

The young buyer of recordings ex- 
pects something new each time out, 
and, subsequently, we, the producers, 
attempt to work in much closer con- 
tact with the market. Disk jockeys, 
radio program directors, record li- 
brarians and distributors are now 
playing a larger role than ever before 
on the recording scene. Their collec- 
tive opinions are invaluable in our 
efforts to pinpoint our public's pulse. 
Extensive research projects are now 
Standard Operating Procedure in the 
industry; much more so than in the 
past. 

It is our response, then, to the ex- 
istent diversity of taste: our efforts 
to appeal to and satisfy a fluctuating 
consumer market, that suggests a 
trend. An operational one, however, 
rather than any new surge to Calyp- 
so, Answer Songs, Foreign Imports, 
etc. 

We, the Artist and Repertoire man- 
agers, must be infinite!) more aware 



of and attuned to the re-actions of 
consumers, today. That taste range 
is vast; interests move around — to 
lush-stringed instrumental, novelties 
(which have popped up out of no- 
where, suddenly, throughout record- 
ing history), movie themes, country 
songs, folk fads, comedy tracks, Ca- 
lypso, and even the spoken word. 

The trend is to a keener pursuit of 
the possibilities in all of these areas, 
even to the point of employing "spe- 
cialists" to fit the particular talents 
of individual artists. The trend, too, 
is to a much wider search for record- 
ing material. And. finally, the cur- 
rent trend runs to the contracting of 
a plethora of young artists, contem- 
poraries of the youthful consumers 
with whom an all-important rapport 
can more easily be established. 

Entertainment values on Pop sin- 
gles are rapidly approaching these on 
long-playing albums. We are only 
now beginning to explore, to the full- 
est, our industry's capabilities. 

By doing so, we hope to make 
trends — rather than wait for them to 
"happen." 

Don Costa, director, Artists & Reper- 
toire, I nited Artists Records, New York 
Forecasting the new trends in our 
business can be most hazardous, but 
these forecasts are vital if the indus- 
try as a whole, and an individual 



A rather unin- 
hibited R&R 
sound using 
standard tunes, 
name artists 



company, are to continue to progress. 
Right now. it would appear that 
we are going to see a marked shift 
toward the Latin beat, not in the 
form we now know and hear, rather 
through the use of smaller orchestras 
and combos who specialize in this 
type of rlnthni. The swiftness with 
which the Pachanga-Charanga ar- 




rived is one indication of this, the 
wide acceptance by the younger rec- 
ord fans of pop tunes with a Latin 
beat is another. 

M < >~t of us are agreed that Rod 
and Roll is now an established part 
of the music field. I believe we will 
see a move to the sound of three or 
four years ago in this area, a com- 
bination of the rather uninhibited 
sound plus the use of more so-called 
standard tunes. An example would 
be the combination of sound plus 
the old hit. Blue Moon which would 
appear to be the forerunner of this 
trend. 

I believe the full Sounds employe^ 
by the singers like Steve Lawrence 
and Eydie Gorme, for example, will 
continue to increase in popularity, 
and that the trend towards best-sell- 
ing motion picture themes, per- 
formed as instrumental, will also be 
on the upswing in the months to 
come. 

Over-all, I look for a resurgence 
of the record business at most levels, 
with the stress on sound plus the use 
of the best-possible names and songs 
to accentuate the recordings. 

David Kapp, president, Kapp Records, 
New York 

An\ man who stays in the record 
business for an extended period of 
time must attempt to anticipate the 
kind of music to which people will 
respond. I don't know what the 
next trend will be, because trends are 
not necessarily planned. As a matter 
of fact, like "Topsy" most of them 
"just growed." No one planned the 
rock 'n roll craze. The tag actually 
appeared long after the music itself 
was accepted. 

The time of the year, to an extent, 
determines the kind of recording- m 
plan. If I were to predict the kind of 
music people would be buying from 
November to February. I would think 
of the kind of music they listen to 
indoors: the music that is most suit- 
able for the time of the year when 
night comes very early. As we pre- 



54 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



■* 




pare for the releases during the 
spring and summer months, I think 
in terms of music which has a bright- 
er feeling. For example, we record- 
led Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow 
Polka Dot Bikini in May, for I be- 
llieve it is easier for people to sing 
"Itsy etc." than Gloomy Sunday 
while driving on the open road with 
(the top down. Our hope is that we 



Public will be 
looking for pop- 
ular inspira- 
tional themes 
such as 
'Exodus' 



lean properly guess where the people 
will go to satisfy their musical appe- 
tites and what these appetites will be. 
;My guess, at this point, is that peo- 
ple will be looking for inspirational 
music and inspirational themes in the 
days ahead of us. 

They are already responding to the 
film and music of Exodus, which 
! represents the struggle of a people 
for freedom. This struggle for free- 
dom of expression and faith con- 
tinues in Africa and within many 
lother nations whose goals are the 
'same. It is mirrored in the message 
of our new President Kennedy, and 
las more people join the "movement," 
|so will they want the songs to sing. 
1 1 think they will be looking for songs 
i which will mean to them what "Bat- 
tle Hymn of the Republic" meant in 
its day and still means today. 

This does not necessarily mean 
that the demand will be for "tri- 
umphal marches." It will mean only 
that there is an awakening and when 
ithere is an awakening there must be 
|a song to tell the story. It is easier 
to sing God Bless America than it 
lis to say "God Bless America." Peo- 
ple can put an emotion into a song 
i which they can never put into a 
ispeech. 

One of the most important records 
we ever issued is In Jerusalem sung 
,by Jane Morgan. People hear it and 
|are inspired. I think there will be 
other songs which will instill in peo- 
ple the power of faith and devotion, 
iand I hope they come soon. 



Clyde Otis, Artist & Repertoire mana- 
ger, Mercury Record Corp., New York 
Anyone who assumes that he or 
(Please turn to page 60) 




« ARTHUR FREED '*»««*. mi«n 



SELL 




'J*-. *• 



MUSIC 
LEROY 



WD 



RICHARD RODGERS OSCAR HAMMERSTtiN 

HOWARD LINDSAY • WlSSft CHOOSE 



HUE OF THE 1AU g MN8WEB B»UET SEJtf Mil 
flDOU-HOBLE if' S1IUBAN8 ^ SLEIGH RIDE - 

T« SYNCOttTEO C10H SOW OF TK KUS • 
fQ&OIJEN WElMSf J 'HE FIRS! Oil OF SPfflNS 
Bltt TINC8 THE MNNTWHISTU SOKG £ 



& ^ VINCENT - MKHW • ® 



& $ 





1260 AM 
102.1 FM 

33 Great Songs 33 






V* 



, SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



CLEVELAND'S NO. 1 INFLUENCE 

WDOK, 1515 Euclid Ave., Cleveland 15, Ohio 

MAin 1-2890 • TWX: CV 158 

Fred Wolf— President & General Manager 

National Rep.: H-R Representatives, Inc. 

PLaza 9-6800 

55 




One of the superior productions through which 
creative talent and community leadership are 
continually building new vision into Television 
on stations represented by 



BLAIR-TV 



"Today's youth is tomorrow's citi- 
zen. Invest in him today— train him, 
teach him, employ him today— and 
the community will be proud of 
him tomorrow. That principle has 
inspired WABC-TV's youth project 
—a continuing scries of varied pro- 
grams, designed to uplift the values, 
raise the standards and stimulate 
the ambitions of today's young 
people." 

Joseph Stamler 
Vice Pres., W ABC-TV 



56 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 19( 



Priceless Asset 

The needs of New York youth are a 
tllenge to WABC-TV. Specifically, it 
is, what are these needs? And what is 
i ng done to meet them? 
^robing for answers, the station has 
uck a rich vein of program material. 
: r example, "Expedition: New York," a 
|ies presenting the sights, sounds and 
nple of the world's greatest metropolis. 
'Expedition: New York" was launched 
October 1960. Presented. in prime time, 
t ppeals strongly to all age groups-yet 
lays spotlights the traditions that help 
nth better understand the New York of 
;ay-and tomorrow. Outstanding pro- 
ims include Sloan Wilson on "It's a 
:at Place to Learn"; Sam Levenson on 
lucation: Tailor-Made"; Myron Cohen 
"The Fabulous Five Streets"; the 

I aid Tribune editorial board on "The 
Uspaper Game". 

Vhen mail count for a single program 
jeeds 4,000, when an average of 350 

Jents submit essays on each telecast- 
si a station can truly be said to have 
i eloped "a winner." 

Guarding a community's priceless asset 

I I \outh— does not begin and end with a 
::le series. It is a continuing campaign: 
'nith: A Summer Crisis?," examining 
iblems of teen-agers with time on their 
ids: "High School Sports," emphasiz- 
i fair play and leadership; "Salute to 

Jth," presented in cooperation with the 
C Commerce Department; and a "Jobs 
Youth" campaign with the NY State 
ployment Service. 

To Blair-TV, creative community- 
rest programming by great stations 
WABC-TV is a real source of inspi- 
on. We are proud to serve more than 
ore of such stations in national sales. 



BLAIR-TV 



Televisions' s first exclusive 
national representative, serving: 

WABC-TV-New York 

W-TEN-Albany-Schenectady-Troy 

WFBG-TV-Altoona-Johnstown 

WNBF-TV-Binghamton 

WHDH-TV-Boston 

WBKB-Chicago 

WCPO-TV-Cincinnati 

WEWS-Cleveland 

WBNS-TV-Columbus 

KTVT-Dallas-Ft. Worth 

WXYZ-TV- Detroit 

KFRE-TV-Fresno 

WNHC-TV-Hartford-New Haven 

WJIM-TV-Lansing 

KTTV-Los Angeles 

WMCT-Memphis 

WDSU-TV-New Orleans 

WOW-TV-Omaha 

WFIL-TV-Philadelphia 

WIIC— Pittsburgh 

KGW-TV-Portland 

WPRO-TV-Providence 

KGO-TV— San Francisco 

KING-TV-Seattle-Tacoma 

KTVI-St. Louis 

WFLA-TV-Tampa-St. Petersburg 




National and regional bays 
in work now or recently completed 



PHUYS 
summit ^MB^ IN ^NHBB*^ 



TV BUYS 

Swift & Co., Chicago: Campaign for Allsweet margarine begins 
this month in about 45 markets. Schedules of day and night 60's run 
till forbid. Buyer: Mary Lou Ruxton. Agency: Leo Burnett Co., 
Chicago. 

General Foods Corp., Post Div., Battle Creek: Kid show minutes 
begin this month on Post's Alpha-Bits and Sugar Crisps. Schedules 
are for four weeks, in 25-30 market. Buyer: George Simko. Agency: 
Benton & Bowles. New York. 

Rust-Oleum Corp., Evanston, 111.: Staggered start dates have been 
set for this month and next on its rust-preventive products, with the 
southern states opening up first. Sixty top markets will get 13-week 
schedules using night minutes and 20's or programs, depending on 
market. Buyer: Marilyn McDermott. Agency: O'Grady-Anderson- 
Gray, Inc., Chicago. 

Minute Maid Corp., Orlando. Fla.: Approximately 75 markets are 
lined up for its Hi-C fruit drinks. Day and night schedules begin 17 
April for 13 to 17 weeks in about half the markets; 1 May in the rest. 
Buyer: Dorothy Medanic. Agency: Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, N. Y. 

Berkshire Knitting Mills, Reading. Pa.: Two-week campaign for 
its women's hose starts 15 April in about 25 markets. Moderate fre- 
quencies of day and fringe 60's are being used. Buyer: Henry Cleeff. 
Agency : Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, New York. 

Procter & Camble Co., Bleach Product Div., Cincinnati: Going 
into about 50 markets with new schedules for Clorox 24 April. Early 
and late night minutes will be placed for 10 weeks. Buyer: Clarice 
McCreary. Agency: Honig-Cooper, Harrington & Miner. San Fran- 
cisco. 

RADIO BUYS 

Fisher Body Div., Ceneral Motors Corp., Detroit: Its Body By 
Fisher campaign starts 24 April for two weeks, in 54 markets. Sched- 
ules are traffic minutes and 30's, ranging from 40 to 100 per week per 
market. Buyer: Maria Carayas. Agency: Kudner Adv., Inc., N. Y. 

American Oil Co., New York: Spring-summer campaign for Amoco 
gas starts 24 April for 12-26 weeks, depending on market. Traffic 
minute schedules are being bought in about 60 markets, two-station 
buys in the top markets. Agency: D'Arcy Adv. Co., Chicago. 

Burgermeister Brewing Corp., San Francisco: Campaign for its 
beers begins this month in about 25 western markets. Placements are 
for 13 weeks, Monday-through-Friday traffic and day minutes. 15 to 
25 per week per market. Buyer: Mary Liz Loeber. Agency: BBDO. 
San Francisco. 



^SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



57 



SPOT AGAIN 

{Continued from page 38) 

Vgency's director » > f sales develop- 
ment, stated: "This will be the new 
products decade, and spot t\ is the 
medium for new products." 

Barrett lia~ jusl released a presen- 
tation to advertisers and agencies 
eailed. "The L960's: Your Products 
and National Spot Television," which 
documents, among other things, the 
success of new products introduced 
via the medium (French's instant 
potatoes. Folger's coffee, Vmsco 
sponge cloth. Sara l.ee frozen chick- 
en, and Comet cleanser among 
other- i . 

Explaining the reason for the 
Stud) at this lime, he pointed out that 
"big companies are looking for 
something fresh -to steal a march — 
like Metrical. Products such as 
Listerine, old and established and 
with a •">()', share of the market, are 
faced todav with sudden competition. 
We count five or six companies go- 
ing alter the oral antiseptic market. 

"The challenged leaders are going 
to have to advertise more. Even if 
they hold their share, and that's 
doubtful, their profit margins are go- 



ing to be squeezed out. New prod- 
ucts will give them fresh new profit 

margins. Metrecal, the original ex- 
ample, is now faced with perhaps 100 
competing brands, counting all the 
private labels." I See, "A booming 
new industry watches Metrecal."' 

sponsor, 9 Januarj 1961. i 

Flexibility and balance are two 
other major attributes of spot tv. 
The Katz presentation quotes a 10 
October I960 Sponsor-Scope item to 
the effect that "It is this superior 
flexibility thai makes it possible for 
an advertiser to plug up the com- 
petitive weak spots within two weeks 
after the issuance of a Nielsen Groc- 
er) Index." This makes media huv- 
ing for packaged goods ""more and 
more of a hand-to-mouth process." 

Most of the excitement in the in- 
dustry in the past few weeks has been 
in spot tv — although the networks 
are doing exceptionally well. too. 
New ^ork business included: P&G's 
Duz (Compton), \von cosmetics 
i Monroe Dreherl. Palmolive soap 
f Bates), American Homes Instantine 
(Compton) and Sani-Flush I Bates). 
Ivor) liquid (Compton). Calumet 
Baking Powder (FC&Bi. Post Toast- 




NO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1,520.100 Drug Sales $ 10,355,000 

Households 123,600 Vutomotive Sales - 299,539,000 

Consumer Spendable Income General Merchandise S 148,789,000 

Jl, 761 ,169,000 total Retail Sales f 1,286 ,255 ,000 

Food Sales | 300,486,000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 71% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to November, 1960 ARB we average 71 % share of audience from 
9 a.m. to midnight, 7 days a week. 



KNOE-TV 

Channel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 



CBS • ABC 

A James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 



ies (B&B). El Producto and La Vera 

cigars I Compton i . General Mills 
Twinkies (D-F-S), Maxwell House 
instant and Yuban coffees (B&Bl 
Jack Frost sugar (Y&R), Carta 
Products — various (SSC&B). Best 
Food's Hellmann's mavonnaise and 
Dash l D-F-S i. Zest (B&B), and 
Bumble Bee tuna f Manor! I. 

Radio business out of New ^oik 
included: Beech-Nut coffee (Chas. 
Hoyt). Hills Bros, coffee (Aver). 
Seabrook Fauns i \1 Paul LeftonJ 
DeCaf (McCann-E). and Ohio Oil 
( \ver). 

Spot tv business coming out ol 
Chicago since mid-March: Mr. Clean 
(Tatham -Laird), All-State (Burnett I 
S. C. Johnson's Holidav (FC&B| 
Butternut coffee (Tatham-Laird I. 
Lever's Swan (NL&B), Brown Shoe 
(Burnett). Purina dog chow (Gard- 
ner), Quaker's Life (JWTi. Pet 
Milk's Sego I Gardner I . Kool-Afl 
(FC&B). Also Kellogg (Burnett I. 
Rust-Oleum (O'Gradv. V&G), Amer- 
ican Dairy I Campbell-Mithun • . \m- 
oco (I) Any). Continental Casual 
( Hartman l . Pure Oil's Firebird — ra- 
dio and tv — I Burnett I. and Mberto- 
Culver (Compton). ^ 



Photo: Soulhwest-Feazel Gas Processing, Dubach Plant, Dubach, Louisiana. 



TV'S NEXT TREND 

(Continued from page 39) 

and Miles, for instance, have renewfl 
The Flintstones. 

There is a special advantage t> 
cartoon shows which seems to over- 
weigh an) such conflict. It's tlrifl 
the animated characters can be usfl 
in commercials. Reynolds and Mile- 
have used Flintstones character ii 
opening and closing billboards and 
in final commercials, but not in mid 
die commercials. 

The size of the current cartooi 
trend is not unlimited. None of the 
new cartoons is scheduled after E 
p.m. and it seems that this patten 
will keep cartoons out of later-eve 
ning programing. 

The dependence of cartoons 01 
children is economic as well as | 
matter of audience taste and inter 
est. For years cartoons were regal? 
ed as too expensive for tv. Then neft 
techniques were developed. First 
limited animation was employed. Tv 
cartoons do not require as mucl 
painstaking work as theatrical one- 
Second, segment rotation was (level 
oped in national spot cartoons. Seg 
ments could he gradually re-useid 



58 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1%1 



The re-use of cartoon material de- 
pended on the quick turnover of au- 
dience among children. While the 
programing pattern of network car- 
Itoons is quite different, national spot 
;did provide a proving ground for 
[many cartoon problems. Further- 
imore, since the national spot and 
syndication revivals of cartoon pro- 
duction preceded the network re- 
Ivival by several years, it seems like- 
ly to some observers that non-net- 
work re-use of cartoons can provide 
fan economic cushion for producers 
of network cartoons. 

The color capability of cartoons is 
being exploited by RCA in its new 
Sunday Disney series to be seen on 
NBC TV. Another cartoon show 
seen the same day, Bull Winkle, will 
(also be in color. But ABC TV and 
CBS TV are sticking to a black-and- 
white cartoon policy. 

There is, meanwhile, revival of 
rartoon production in national spot 
;and syndication. Most are shows de- 
signed for children's audiences or for 
early evening family scheduling. Be- 
sides Screen Gems" three national 
ispot cartoon series sold to Kellogg's, 
'I PA-TPI has entered cartoon pro- 
ductions with Dick Tracy sold to 
Post cereals 50 market participation. 
They also have Mister Magoo. 

Commercials producers, too, have 
jumped on the cartoon bandwagon. 
1 ideo-Craft has a new Pinocchio 
series in syndication. Other syndi- 
^ators with new cartoons include 
|UAA with Mello-Tunes, King Fea- 
tures with new Popeye cartoons, 
CBS Films with Deputy Daivg, and 
Trans-Lux with Felix the Cat — all 
shows that antedated the current net- 
work boom. 

A characteristic change has taken 
place in syndication cartoons over 
|the past two seasons. Previously, 
syndication cartoons were almost al- 
ways tv releases of films made in- 
itially for theaters. But today's car- 
loon is a new product, made expressly 
ifor tv and designed to meet tv budg- 
ets and animation standards — each 
Dower than its theatrical counterpart. 

Although few network users have 
too much concern with national spot 
film programing or syndication, the 
fact cannot be overlooked that it is 
m precisely these areas that today's 
cartoon boom began. And these too, 
are the same places where today's 
cartoons could end up as re-runs a 
few years from now. ^ 



G0PM€£S 




WXYZ IS ON THE MOVE . . . 

WXYZ's leading newscaster, Lee McNew, has just 
returned from eight days in the Congo where he took 
exclusive footage and interviews that give insight into 
the basic problem of the Congo ... its newly emancipated 
people. Aired as "Inside The Congo" this %. hour special 
received such wide acclaim, "WXYZ is making it avail- 
able for syndication. This "on tap" practice is what keeps 
WXYZ -TV "on top" . . . dominating the audience with 
20 of the top 25 shows! * 
Tap your Blair man now for the top station in Detroit. 



^Nielsen, Jan., Feb., 1961 



Ji&WwMwL 



abc. 

CHANNEL 



DETROIT 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY AMERICAN BROADCASTING-PARAMOUNT THEATRES 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



59 



SATURATION 

[Continued from page 41) 

to just tr\ the product, he said. 

" I he personality Bel] idea has run 
Its gamut, just as the singing jingle 
and regular saturation have." he 
said. "We've come up with super- 
concentration which adds up to im- 
pact and Bales results." he said. 

Although Zuhrow does not do 
hi and awareness tests for Brooks, it 
does Inner reaction surveys on vari- 
ous products. "Awareness tests have 
not been undertaken for a basic rea- 
son," said Drutt. "We operate on a 
local basis, therefore we know each 
month what advertising and promo- 
tional expenses have heen and we can 
correlate them with our sales."' he 
said. "We are on such a direct line 
(advertising, sales promotion and 
sales effectiveness i that we don't 
have to pet at effectiveness through 
consumer awareness." he said. 

\\ hat about the future of Brooks' 
radio advertising? "Although the 
technique we've used for Brooks has 
heen ver\ effective," said Drutt, "it 
has created a considerable amount 
of interest among agencies and ad- 
vertisers all over the countrv. 

"We therefore know that at some 
future time we won't he able to use 
this effectivelj for Brooks. We have 
planned for that da) when super-sat- 
uration technique loses the effective- 
ness it now has." While he declined 
to discuss details of these plans, he 
intimated they involve broadcast 
media. 

Brooks advertises in (lights In ne- 
cessity. "Even if we could afford to 
he on .">2 weeks a year with the kind 
of concentration we've found neces- 
sary, we wouldn't use it because it 
might tend to create consumer ill- 
will."' said Sherry. He explained 
that Zuhrow has designated lour pro- 
motional periods for Brooks during 
the fiscal year. All advertising and 
merchandising efforts are concen- 
trated in these promotional periods. 
There is no set pattern for determin- 
ing when these periods will fall. But 
there is a six- to eight-week flight in 
each quarter. 

Besides the three (now five) "\ 
markets designated by Brooks for 
heavy concentration, there is also 
some broadcast activity in what the 
agenc) calls "B" markets. There 
were six of these in the last fiscal 
year, and. in these markets, "aver- 
age" spot buys are made. Gradual!) 



(he agenc) hopes to nurture these 
markets to '" \" status, as has been 
done with Cleveland and Detroit. 

there are also "("" markets in 
which Brooks Foods is ■'hanging on 
by its fingernails." In these 12 mar- 
kets Brooks presently jusl hopes to 
sta) in business against the da) when 
the "C's" can he elevated to "B's." 

I In- rest of Brooks' .'W-markct dis- 
tribution is known as "all others." 
Brooks has sales representatives here. 
There are occasional orders. \t pres- 
ent Zuhrow is sitting tight with these, 
but hopes one da\ to continue the 
graduating process. ^ 

LOCAL SHOTS 

{Continued from page 45) 

in the film depicting the progress and 
problems of Nigeria's peaceful emer- 
gence as one of the free nations of 
Africa. BBDO's role consisted of 
some writing, structuring and basic- 
editing on the program. 

On deck are two hour-long pic- 
torials, one about Los Angeles Dodg- 
ers rookie Willie Da\ is. the other, 
decathlon champion Rafer Johnson. 
Here again, there's general appeal 
both from a human interest and 
sports standpoint, plus, industry ob- 
servers note, little extra dividend for 
the Negro viewer. 

For the Willie Davis pictorial, to 
be aired in New York and three oth- 
er markets tentatively on 2 May. 
BBDO turned the assignment over to 
David Wolper, independent produc- 
er, who was responsible for the wide- 
l\ circulated one-shot. "Race for 
Space." Academy award winning 
cameraman James Wong Howe has 
been filming scenes re-creating Wil- 
ie's early days in California and his 
current Florida spring training ad- 
ventures. 

The Willie Davis show is expected 
to have a prime time showing prob- 
abl) on WNBC-TV, New York. 
Placing local one-shots advantageous- 
ly is of course always a major prob- 
lem. While it's an exception to find 
a choice slot on a network o&o, good 
openings are to he had for quality 
material. The stations and the me- 
dium benefit from carrying such pro- 
grams. sa\s Foreman. 

Another important segment of the 
Schaefer special lineup is iuard 
Theater, which consists of the 
"cream" of the feature film packages, 
presented by WCBS-TV, New York. 
approximately once a month. ^ 




SPONSOR ASKS 

'Continued from patie .">.">) 

she can prophes) trends in am are 
of the arts, to say the least, i- -nil 
mistaken. Therefore may I SUggJ 
that there are a few basic things thy 
are happening in today's record mat 
ket which are deserving of attenlioi 
These are. firstly, the stability of tli 
so-called unstable Hock and Ro 



/ // types of po 

music are gcM 
ing stability i 
today's recom 

nun let 



market, and the revival of old son 
that once made it in the Rock an 
Roll field and which are apparent] 
making it again, either by wa\ of rt 
release or new recordings of same. 

Secondly, the stability of the c\ri 
widening Pop market which seems t 
transcend and encompass all sphesl 
of musical tastes — meaning CounS 
and Western, Rhythm and Blue- an 
Rock and Roll. No longer doc- th 
abject selectivity surround the ind 
vidual Pop buyer. As a matter < 
fact, it seems that the Pop recor 
buyer of todav is the only one wi 
actuall) buys for the sound rathe 
than the product; in other word 
the average Pop record buyer will g 
in a store and walk out with as man 
as four or five different types of re< 
ords, which we as a companv lm 
ver\ stimulating and challenging. 

I nfortunately, main people in on 
industr) are here solely to make 
fast buck. I think that the t i m 
has arrived when all of us in tli 
business should take the time oi 
and do a little soul searching. I ai 
sure this is not a unique proposal hi 
on the other hand the salvation < 
the record business and espreiall 
single records is at stake. It is wit 
much interest that I note the deta 
given to products by a couple of tli 
major companies and I assure yo 
that we here at Mercury, while in 
aware of what the future ma) hoi 
and certainh not being in a positio 
to predict the trends will, noneth 
less, devote ourselves to offering tl 
public the best product availahl 
\nd if any new trends are on tl 
horizon, we shall endeavor to .- 
them. # 



60 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 19t 



if 

EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT 





NEWS 
FEATURES 

GOOD MUSIC 



— and the biggest pace-setting change is on 

WFAA -820 RADIO 



"SOUTHWEST CENTRAL" ... a completely new format 
with the emphasis on electronic journalism is the key to the 
great new sound on WFAA-820 RADIO in Dallas! Backed by 
the biggest advertising campaign in WFAA's history, all North 
Texas is finding a radio "home" that's informative and delight- 
fully entertaining day and night! Originating from our new 
multi-million dollar "Communications Center" with all new 
equipment, WFAA-820's powerful 50,000 watt clear 
channel voice beams "Southwest Central" to an area of over 
5 million people! 



NBC News on the Hour followed by 5 minutes of State & Local News! 

Brief cut-ins all day long from WFAA's staff meteorologist, woman's 
editor, sports director, farm editor, and other human interest stories. 

with a special appeal to the young adult, comprising the best of the albums 
and the current top popular hits. 



Your Petryman has an Audition Tape of the New 
"Southwest Central" from WFAA Radio . . . Call Him! 



Represented by 
I EdwardYPelry *Yco., Inc.) 

The Original Station Representative 



BROADCAST SERVICE OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 




PONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



820 RADIO 
DALLAS 

61 



SPONSOR 
WEEK 

WRAP-UP 



POOLSIDE PITCH is Triangle's idea at Chicago luncheon, held at the Sheraton-Towers. Illus- 
trated presentation giving highlights of the Fresno, California market, and Triangle's station 
KFRE-TV, Fresno, was made by Ed Benedict (far left), Triangle's director of national sales, to 
(l-r): John Stetson, Don Carlson, and Mary Lou Ruxton of Leo Burnett Advertising Agency 




Advertisers 




Pabst (K&E Chicago) has bou 
half of i In* Tripb* Crown raea 
be broadcast ibis spring on b 
CBS TV and CBS Radio. 

The package price for half of tl 
three events: $175,000 gross. 

Campaigns: 

• Maxwell House, division ( 
eral Foods, getting together \ 
Amsco Toys in a joint tv cannfl 

to promote the beverage and a 
coffee serving set. The promafl 
Maxwell House Coffee Time Set. 
tv schedule: Amsco sponsorship 
net children's shows (Captain A 
garoo. Shari Lewis, etc i . plus ai 
tional minute spots on local ki< 
shows in nine major Amsco mark 
Maxwell House will boost the p 
with sponsorship of two major 
nighttimers, daytime net in 70 n 
kets and some 4,000 spots in rr 
than 100 leading markets. Agei 
Ogilvy, Benson & Mather for IV 
well House. 



WINNING SMILE from Nancy Ann Flaming, Miss America of I960, cheers up Hank Pointel, public affairs man for WSJS 
N. C. On the 'Harvey Dinkins Show,' Miss Fleming discussed her adventures during the past year as Miss America, and 



TV, Whston-Sa 
attended a coi 




• White Sewing Machine, in an 

fort to encourage local dealers to 
<e radio and tv advertising, has 
arted a dealer advertising allowance 
s an campaign. The new co-op sys- 
\m: for each machine purchased, the 
•aler receives advertising credit. 



EOPLE ON THE MOVE : Ernest 

Hueter, from director, bread sales 
d advertising, to v. p.. Interstate 
ikeries. L.A. 



Ag ies 



;eney appointments: Lanolin 
jus, its new product, Color Plus, 
June debut via tv and radio) to 
liiniel & Charles, and its Rybutol 
itamins to Cohen & Aleshire . . . 
i J. Ritter, Bridgeton, N. J. (Ritter 
I mato Catsup, Tomato Juice, To- 
Hto Relish, Asparagus-in-glass and 
irk & Beans) to Zubrow, Philadel- 
}ia . . . Vick Chemical, division 
-ehardson-Merrell, to Sullivan, 
•aufTer, Colwell & Bayles for its 
icks Vatronol Nasal Medication and 



Vicks Sinex Nasal Spray, and its 
Clearasil products, to Morse Inter- 
national . . . Montgomery Ward to 
Campbell-Mithun for national cam- 
paign planning . . . Wolf Brand Prod- 
ucts, subsidiary Quaker Oats, to Clay 
Stephenson Associates, Houston 
. . . Seaquist Valve, Cary, 111., (Sea 
Spray NS-31 and other aerosol dis- 
pensing valves) to M. M. Fisher As- 
sociates, Chicago . . . Treat Potato 
Chip, to Co-Ordinated Marketing. 



Financial note: A. C. Nielsen last 
week declared a quarterly cash divi- 
dend of 12 1 /; cents per share on its 
common stock payable 1 May. 

New offices: McCann-Erickson, 

Time & Life Building. Rockefeller 
Center. New York City . . . Wein- 
traub & Associates, in Houston. 
Tex. 

Name change: Lynch and Hart 
Advertising Company, Clayton, 
Missouri, to Richard C. Lynch Ad- 
vertising Company. 



Merger 



Western Advertising 
with Geyer, Morey, Madden & 
Ballard 1 billings, $40 million) . 



PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Hal 

Rover, from Compton, to Sullivan, 
Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles as v. p. and 
account supervisor, Lipton Tea ac- 
count . . . Scott Costello, Chirurg 
& Cairns, v.p. and general manager, 
taking on additional duties as senior 
v.p. -client services . . . Hillard W. 
Welch, Chirurg & Cairns board 
member, named v. p. -administration 
. . . George R. Garrett, to radio/tv 
department, Wermen & Schorr, Phila- 
delphia . . . Leo J. Turner, from 
Selvage & Lee, to BBD&O as director 
public relations . . . Richard M. 
Detwiller, from Grey, to manager 
public relations department. BBD&O 
. . . George V. Grulich, from ac- 
count executive to v.p. marketing di- 
rector, LaRoche . . . Jose M. Vi- 
cente, from Island Networks. Puerto 
Rico, to account executive, J. Walter 
Thompson, San Juan office . . . Wil- 
liam J. Wiggins, from national rep- 
( Please turn to page 70) 



iLDEN GLOBE award is presented by 
k'mie Van Doren to Joe Barbera (left), and 
l l Hanna "for outstanding achievement in 
rnat'l. tv in cartoons," an annual award 




>f>«SATIONAL 'Jupiter Mors,' San Diego's 

midget actor, Frank Delfino, plugs San 

3go Chargers' professional football team. 

i/rh him, tackles Ernie Wright, Bill Hudson 





GUESTS of Broadcast Advertising Club were Chicago ad agency executives. Seated, (l-r): 
Charles Claggett, chmn. of the board and president, Gardner Advertising, St. Louis; H. E. 
Christiansen, president, Christiansen Advertising; Paul Harper, Jr., president, Needham, Louis 
and Brorby; and Buckingham Sunn, v.p., John Shaw, advertising; Arthur Bagge, BAC president; 
Thomas Wright, Jr., v.p., Leo Burnett; and Donald Nathanson, president, North Advertising 



TROPHY NIGHT, innovated by 
WFLA-AM-TV, Tampa-St. Peters- 
burg, as a merchandising approach 
to the Tampa Jai Alai Fronton, 
picks winner, Salvador. Presenta- 
tion was made by (l-r): Doug 
Duperrault, promotion mgr.; Arch 
Deal, asst. news dir.; Milt Spencer, 
sports dir.; and Frank Johnson 




SPORTACULARS... 




...for Northeastern Ohio TV Homes: Cleveland Indians games... 
Cleveland Browns games... all top CBS sports shows... two daily 
sportscasts... this is action sports programming that builds active 
buying audiences! And it's typical of the top-notch entertainment 
that WJW-TV schedules, day in, day out... to provide opportu- 
nities for advertisers to score big sales victories in Cleveland 
and Northeastern Ohio, the V\r\fl 
nation's 7th largest market. \_J\J 



*CBS CLEVELAND 




64 



CBS CLEVELAND 

A STORER STATION BACKED BY 33 YEARS OF 
RESPONSIBLE BROADCASTING • CALL KATZ 

SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 196 



10 APRIL 1961 

Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



The Justice Department and the FCC are at each other's throats on an anti- 
trust question. 

These are the same two government bodies which acted together to secure the "land- 
mark" Supreme Court decision naming Justice, and not the FCC, as the "expert agency" on 
antitrust matters, even in the broadcasting field. This decision, in the RCA-NBC case, led to 
the plea of "nolo contendere" which ended the case. 

The current case is the complicated Philco protest against renewal of the NBC Phila- 
delphia licenses, which has been denied by the FCC twice and which is now in its second go- 
round in the Appeals Court. 

Justice backed up Philco in asking that the case be returned to the FCC for consideration 
of the RCA-NBC antitrust violation history. Justice strongly criticized the FCC for allegedly 
not worrying about such conduct in the past. 

The Court will, of course, decide whether the FCC must re-hear the case to consider 
this antitrust history. But it would be a mistake to assume that a sweeping precedent, go- 
ing to the heart of future FCC treatment of antitrust law violators, will be involved. The court 
is likely to decide only on the narrow issue of whether Philco has been adequately heard. 



It would be an even more serious mistake to consider, as some in the industry 
do, that the FCC as presently constituted is arguing before the court that antitrust 
consent decrees and pleas of "nolo contendere" are not to be taken as seriously as 
Justice wishes. 

The FCC is arguing purely and simply that Philco had no case. 

A stronger crackdown on antitrust law violators in the future than has been true in the 
past is a certainty, regardless of the outcome of this case. It will hit new applications with 
much more force than applications for license renewals. 

To mention specific cases, Westinghouse and GE, along with any less recently involved 
station operators should have little difficulty with license renewals. The FCC will weigh the 
type of service given to the public. It could be rougher on NBC in view of allegations 
that this network is in something of a monopoly position in broadcasting. It could be plenty 
tough on those broadcasters with antitrust backgrounds who can be accused of poor 
performance as station operators. 

Applicants for new stations, where there are competing applications of a qualified na- 
ture, are apt to find an antitrust background an absolute disqualification. 

The unnoticed part of the current FCC-Justice squabble is that the FCC did not dis- 
pute the over-all Justice theme. It merely said these considerations should not apply in 
the Philco case. 

The fact is, the FCC has changed since then-chairman Doerfer said that antitrust viola- 
tions are merely a penalty of doing business on a big scale. The current commission will take 
such violations seriously. 

As for the Justice Department, it not only failed to advise against renewal of 
the NBC Philadelphia licenses, it approved the consent decree and interposed no 
objections to the series of proposed sales and trades which followed. 

The Justice brief, however, does clearly mirror the close attention which that De- 
partment will be giving to business practices in broadcasting. 



10 APRIL 1961 



65 



Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 







FILM-SCOPE 



10 APRIL 1961 

Cwr-Hht IMI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The quiet of the past few months in first-run syndication of action-adventur 
shows has been ended at last by Ziv-UA's release of King of Diamonds. 

The show stars Broderick Crawford, four-year syndication veteran of Highway Patrol. 

In the last six months the only other action-adventure shows from the major shops hav 
been just two: Ziv-UA's Miami Undercover last October and Screen Gems Tallahasse 
7000, which came out in December. 

An oddity of the current market is this: overseas demand for new product is high i 
areas like Australia. 

Hence, don't be surprised if you discover that shows are sold overseas before the 
are sold at home — a reversal of the usual procedure. 






Twentieth Century-Fox serves as one model of what a feature film produce 
without a syndication affiliate can do to sell its post-1948's to tv. 

The producer broke up its movie inventory into groups: one went to NTA some time age 
a second was sold to NBC TV for Saturday night exposure (the first major prime time nd 
work sale of features), and now it has put out a third group which Seven Arts Assoc 
ated will handle. 

The lessons of 20th 's pattern seem to be this: a feature film producer can sometime 
do best by dividing up its libraries into packages of a size that stations can diges 
readily and by using several distributors it puts more salesmen to work on its feature* 



Hopes still being held out by syndicators of making network deals for next set 
son are growing fainter and fainter. 

As of this week, with the final score not yet in, several syndicators could be mentione 
who had network deals this year but who have none for the upcoming 1961-62 season. 

Should a negative trend continue, this loss of network business couldn't come t 
a worse time — just when the domestic syndication program market for first-runs is also i 
a slump. 

One long-range prognosis is that re-runs, feature films, children's shows, overseas sale 
licensing — all only recently regarded as peripheral syndication activities — to play majt 
and increasing roles through 1962. 



66 



Syndication's adventure programing often depended for its inspiration upo 
network trends, but in cartoons the shoe is now on the other foot. 

The boom in cartoons in national spot and syndication of the past season or two hi; 
finally spread to all the networks. 

This season ABC TV had two prime time cartoons, Flintstones and Bugs Bunny r . 

But in 1961-62, all three networks will have at least one prime time cartoo 
ABC TV is renewing its current shows and is adding Top Cat and Calvin and the Colon' 
while CBS will have Alvin and the Chipmunks, and Disney is switching over to NBC TV ai 
a full color emphasis. 

(For story, see p. 38, this issue.) 



SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 



. 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Marty Roberts of NTA reports a solution to a long-standing feature film pro- 
motion problem: the high cost of special promotion slides. 

Formerly stations were provided with one slide for each feature, costing the distributor 
about $75 for each 100 pictures, a figure that easily mounted into the thousands when the cost 
was multiplied by the number of stations getting the service. 

Roberts' solution : preparing slides in strip form which the stations could mount 
as needed, costing only $4. 

The practice has now become widespread. Other feature film distributors using it are 
Seven Arts, PTI, UAA, and Flamingo. 



Insiders guess that this year's total of new shows for syndication might not ex- 
ceed six or seven. 

If true, this means that major syndicators won't have more than a few shows each, many 
not more than one, and some none at all. 



Although Seven Arts has taken the station-by-station route to sell the Warners 
Films of the 50's group, its slow but steady flow of business has already reached 
62 stations. 

Among most recent sales is WJBK-TV, Detroit. 



NTA is one of the few tv-based companies to jump into the pay-tv field. 

It claims that its system, NTA-Home Entertainment, costs 50% less to make and 70% 
less to install and maintain than competing systems. 

Others in the pay-tv field include: Paramount -Telemeter, Western Union -Teleprompter, 
Zenith-Phonovision, and Skiatron. 



Television Enterprises Corp. (TEC) has a music series and an adventure show 
on its production drawing boards. 

The shows are: Mahalia Jackson Sings, and Sebastian, a full-hour adventure. 



CBS Films has been active lately in license merchandising of network news and 
entertainment properties. 

Dell will do a paperback book on Danger Man, an ITC series on CBS TV; in addition, 
hard-back books by Little, Brown or Lippincott will be done on three CBS News series and 
Carousel Films division of McGraw-Hill will get non-theatrical distribution of several news 
programs. 

A syndicated property just licensed is Deputy Dawg; stuffed toys will be made by Earle 
Pullan of Toronto. 

Overheard: that another network will follow CBS' example shortly in divest- 
ing itself of some of its tape facilities — but in this case to sell to an independent 
tape producer. 

Unlike CBS, which curtailed its tape operation recently for policy reasons, another net- 
work seems on the verge of shuttering part of its tape operation along with studio property 
for reasons of cost efficiency. 

10 APRIL 1961 67 




A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



10 APRIL 1961 

Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Picking a show for the fall in ABC TV's Thursday 9:30-10 p.m. period has 
come a whopper because it entails the meeting of four minds. 

It starts off with a two-way agreement between Compton and B&B, entails the blessing, 
of course, of P&G and, beyond that, the choice must meet with ABC TV's approval. 



One of the more important drug packaging accounts is in jeopardy at a top- 
rung Madison Ave. agency. 

A major disgruntlement on the part of the client: the network tv record. 

Second top-rank man in one of the biggest agency billers in air media is begin- 
ning to feel the squeeze from his fellow brass because of a particular failing. 

The indicted penchant: veering away from strong, knowledgeable, key personnel when 
it comes to staffing the departments under his authority. 

One agency has become so cynical about the purported expertize in picking 
nighttime network tv shows that it's quietly engaging in an experiment of its own. 

The stunt: putting all the programs it has explored in a hat, picking out a batch of 
them and, at the end of the season, matching the selectees against the actual hits. 

It's being referred to as the Monte Carlo systeming of program selection. 

Members wearing two, or even three, hats have become a sort of travail with- 
in the American Newspaper Publishers Association. 

Some of the ANPA's board of directors are grumbling that half of their confreres 
have tv/radio affiliations, and this inclines them not to be aggressive enough against 
broadcast media. 



C8 



What probably contributes much to JWT's stability on the tv front is the fact 
that its strength is pretty well distributed between the New York and Chicago offices. 

In Chicago there's Kraft, Quaker Oats, Schlitz, and 7-Up, while in New York the tv bill- 
ings derive in the main from Lever, Scott Paper, French, Kodak, Standard Brands, and Ford. 
The latter might be regarded as a twin responsibility of the Detroit and New York 
offices. 

Barter and P.I.'s are no recent innovations in the business. 

Back when radio was just coming out of the cocoon Anacin bought advertising with 
either stock or on the basis of a percentage of sales within a specified area. 

You never can tell where Booz, Allen & Hamilton will figure next in this busi 
ness. 

For many years it's been NBC's consultant mainstay on organization, personnel anc 
whatnot 

Lately, it had much to do with the decision of the station groups to put itself into th( 
business of representing itself in spot sales. 

SPONSOR • 10 APRIL 196! 



J 




THEY 
LIVE IT 

UP... AND LOVE IT... in the fabulous KSLA 
market. Oil-rich, timber-rich, cattle-rich, and growing industrially . . . this tri-state area hardly knows 
recession. Its people play hard, work hard and have the money to buy. They look to KSLA-TV for 
news they believe . . . programs they enjoy. 

Ask our reps (Harrington, Righter and Parsons) about the fabulous KSLA market! 




KSLA SHREVEPORT 



ONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



69 



WRAP-UP 

{Continued from page 63) 

resentative, I cited Feature Syndi- 
cate, to advertising account executive, 
rlewrj .1. Kaufman Associates, Wash- 
ington . . . Preston I). Huston. \s- 
sociated Advertising Agency presi- 
dent, elected v.p. National Federation 
of Advertising Agencies . . . Fred 
Kawlinson. to \\ rijjht. Newport 
News. \ a., as director, radio t\ de- 
partment operations. 

They were elected ^.p.'s: Wil- 
liam E. Conner, at BBD&O . . . 
Robert II. Higgona and Roli«>rt L. 

Nicholas, assistant v.p.'s at Bates . . . 
Allan II. damage, at Grant . . . 
Thomas R. ("ox. Jr.. executive v.p. 

and hoard of directors member, at 

Wilson, rlaieht & Welch. 



c*^*: 






rVlove 



TOTAL STATIONS ON THE AIR 
(as of I March L961 i 

AM: 3,556 

FM: 839 

TV: 541 
BOUGHT/SOLD APPROVED : 
Purchase of KVOS-TV, Vancouver, 
by Wometco for S3 million in cash 
approved by the FCC. Wometco has 
an interest in three other tv stations: 
WTVJ. Miami: WLOS-TV, Ashe- 
ville, and WFGA-TV, Jacksonville . . . 
Transfer of WSAZ. Huntington- 
Charleston, to WJR, The Goodwill 
Station. Inc. of Detroit, approved by 
FCC . . . Four radio stations of the 
Imperial Broadcasting System 
sold to Tom E. Foster. Tolbert 
Foster. W. E. Dyche, Jr., John 
Blake, and Edgar B. Younger for 
a price of .$450,000 through media 
brokers Blackburn X Co. The four 
stations are: KPRO-Riverside-San 
Bernardino; KROP-Braule\ -1.1 Cen- 
tro; KROE-Indio-Palm Springs, and 
KYOR-Bh/the— all in California. The 
first three purchasers listed already 
own K(,l VTV. Tucson, and KDET- 
Wl. Center, Texas. 

Tv Stations 



WGN-TV. Chicago, will have 
First Federal Savings and R. J. 
Reynolds as sponsors of its base- 
hall telecasts this year — in addi- 
tion t<> Bamm'a beer. 



The station will cover 122 daytime 
home games in color. 19 road games 
at night and one during the day. 

For the station it will he the 14th 
year of baseball telecasts. Theo. 
Ilanmi Brewing of St. Paul (Camp- 
bell-Mithun, Minneapolis) is about to 
-t ii it its ninth year of sponsorship of 
the Raines. 

The other two advertisers will he 
new this season. R. J. Reynolds placed 
its order through Win. Kst\ . New 
^ oik. and First Federal Savings and 
Loan Association through Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample, Chicago. 

Said Morton Bodfish. chairman 
and president of First Federal Sav- 
ings: "We are in the business of 
selling two things: sa\inns accounts 
and mortgages for home purposes. 
The families who watch baseball of 
an afternoon or evening are the kinds 
of families who save their money and 
buy homes. It's as simple as that." 

The KELO-LAIND stations were 
honored by a special resolution 
passed by the South Dakota 
House of Representatives for 
their coverage of the activities of 
the legislative body. 

The unanimous resolution, present- 
ed to stations president Joe Floyd, 
honored the stations for their cover- 
age of the inauguration and of the 
body's sessions. 

The Sioux Falls station has also 
provided coverage of legislative ac- 
tivity in Minnesota and Iowa. 



PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Nor- 
man Hayes to sales department of 
WJXT. Jacksonville: he was former- 
ly with WCAU-TV. Philadelphia, and 
WMOX-TV, St. Louis . . . Robert 
Carpenter appointed assistant tv 
sales manager for WOOD-TV. Grand 
Rapids; he was previously with 
WOOD radio . . . Two promotions at 
WNBQ. Chicago, are: Norman F. 
Cissna to local sales manager, and 
Jack Hauser to manager of sales 
development, both effective 1 April 
. . . William M. Alexander named 
commercial manager for WFMY-TV. 
Greensboro, N. C; he was formerly 
the station's local and regional sales 
manager . . . Bill Whalen, from 
news director. WICC. Bridgeport, 
Conn., to newly created post, assist- 
ant editor-in-chief of all news, WNAC- 
T\ . AM. Boston, and the Yankee 



Network . . . H. Needham Smith, 

from sales manager, WTRF-TV, 
\\ heeling. W. Va.. to Taft Broadcast. 
ing, Cincinnati. 

Staff changes at WTRF-TV, Wheel- 
ins:. W. Va.: Cyril J. Ackermann, 

from regional sales manager to na- 
tional sales manager; C. Kirk Jack- 
son, from sales service manager to 
regional sales manager; promotion 
director James H. Knight, taking 
on additional duties of merchandising 
manager: Wesley M. Manley, pub- 
lic service director and administrative 
assistant, taking on traffic and sys- I 
terns supervision. 

Thisa V data: WRLP, Green- 
field. Mass.. sister station of WWLP. 
Springfield, Mass., to be offered foi 
sale? as separate entitv and not as a 
WWLP bonus buy. 

Washington radio station WQMR. 
winter-weary of broadcasting 
stay-at-home bad driving condi- 
tions, has tailored the traffic 
warnings format to spreading 
sun-shining reports and urging 
listeners to "go out and shop." 

The cheery tid-bits, aired via short 
tag lines during regular weather re- 
ports, has a promotional angle, it 
ties-in area shopping places. 

Permission for these tie-ins werf i 
solicited by letters to retailers signed 
bv WQMR v.p. general manager Ed 
Winton like this: "let me know ii ^ 
you have a particular shopping cen 
ter you would like to have includec 
in this campaign. We would like tc 
have your permission to use it — with 
out charge." 



Ideas at work: 

• The d.j.'s are now tearing u\ 
the bowling alleys: KIM A. Yak 
ima, Wash., disk jockey Jon Good 
man established a new "world's rec 
ord" for consecutive games bowlet 
by a record spinner. He bowled 20( 
games in 48 hours 29 minutes to bea 
the previous bowling record held bj 
Pat Tallman. a San Antonio d.j. 

• WRCV, Philadelphia, u 
ceived over 12,500 letters and card 
in response to its "no-prize, no-gin 
micks. no-incentives request" for r» 






70 



sI'onsoi; 



10 APRIL 196 



action to its Big Band programing 
policy on its first anniversary. Reac- 
tion was favorable and the policy will 
i-ontinue, reports station manager 
Dick Paisley. 

• WINS, New York, is putting 
its Record Review Board to work. 
rhe club is open to listeners who 
ioin by writing for a membership 
;ard. There are 84,000 members and 
hey're being called on to "audition" 
lew record releases in their own 
communities. Under the direction of 
urogram director Rick Sklar, the 
ivlNS Listening Post calls for audi- 
lion sessions every Monday-Friday, 
ittended by listeners in their own 
leighborhoods. 

• Do you have the WKDA dia- 
nond? Passersby in Nashville are 
tsking each other this question since 
he station began its "treasure of dia- 
nonds" listener promotion contest. 
There are six diamonds, total value 
!5,000, being carried by some secret 
'itizen. 

I • Tucson KAIR's gold key shop- 
ping spree contest came to an end 
ast week after 137 clues to the loca- 
iion of the hidden key were given on 
he air. The winner, Mike Stefanik. 
leturned the key to Goodmans Marks 
co-sponsor of the contest) and re- 
ceived $1,000 in exchange. A 15- 
jiinute free shopping spree at any 
ioodmans Market was also part of 
he prize. 

■ • WBIC, Long Island, an- 
nounced the start of an around-the- 
;lock Long Island news service. The 
tation has installed automatic tele- 
phone answering devices on which it 
ecords capsule headlines of impor- 
ant area stories. Listeners can call 
nytime, day or night, to get late 
lews. 

• CKLW, Detroit, sponsored a 
Looney Lid Contest" to see who 
ould put together the most "hectic 
jat" for its d.j.'s to wear in the 
faster Parade. More than 983 hats, 
nade out of everything from waste- 
baskets to rabbit's food, arrived at 
,he station. 

^^ 

:*Jew call letters: KBLL, Helena, 
lontana, formerly KXLJ. 

•EOPLE ON THE MOVE: Dick 

^elliher has been named national 
ales manager of KFRC, San Fran- 
isco. He was formerly manager of 



Adam Young's S.F. office . . . Frank- 
lin Sisson has been named station 
manager of WWJ, Detroit . . . Les 
Lindvig is the new sales manager of 
KOOL-TV, Phoenix . . . Jack Lowe 
has joined the sales staff of WFYI, 
Long Island. Lowe has been affiliated 
with WARL, WOL and WWDC, all 
Washington, and was the voice of 
"Popeye" in the thirties . . . Robert 
Zimmerman named sales manager 
for KRUX, Phoenix . . . Richard 
T. Williams, to account executive 



WEAM, Arlington 



Bob Rohrs 



has resigned as general manager of 
KJAY, Topeka . . . Richard C. Fel- 
lows, to sales manager and William 
A. Earman, to operations manager, 
both WPDQ. Jacksonville, Fla. 

CBS Radio this week puts on the 
road a new slide-sound presenta- 
tion summing up the network's 
new look in serving today's radio 
audience. 



SEAL 
OF GOOD 
PRACTICE 

TELEVISION CODE 



TULSA'S 




POLICIES 



To some this is a seal. To us at 

KVOO-TV it stands for a way of business. 

It represents our pledge of quality 

operation and performance to our 

advertisers and our viewers. It means 

that KVOO-TV works to maintain its 

position as Tulsa's finest station. 



KVOO * TV 





fit )>rt mt h trd by 

(Edw.rd I P.lry 4 I Co . Inc ) 
The Onytnal Stution Rrprmtitatiee 



1V1I 



Sponsor 



10 APRIL 1961 



71 




TELEVISION 

BASICS 



Here's a "must" booklet for everyone in- 
volved in television. 

Get your own copy and one for everyone 
in your department. You'll be referring 
to its useful data all year round. 

Included are sections on the broad dimen- 
sions of tv; on audience viewing habits; 
on network trends; on advertising expendi- 
tures — network spot and local; on color 
tv and stations presently using color 
equipment. There's a brand new section 
too, this year, on the viewing habits of 
the summer television audience. 

FILL COUPON-WEIL BILL YOU LATER 

Price Schedule 





1 to 10 40 cents each 

10 to 50 30 cents each 

50 to 100 25 cents each 

100 to 500 20 cents each 

500 or more 15 cents each 



SPONSOR READERS SERVICE • television basics 
40 E. 49th Street, N.Y. 17, N.Y. 



QUANTITY.. 



I 
I 
I 

I 

I 



The central theme: li<>\\ the |u<>- 
graming which CBS introduced last 
November is compatible in the needs j 
of the listeners — an audience in mo- 
tion and of the advertiser who's 
looking for a medium to give a sense 
of Lmmediacj to his product story. 

\fter the presentation ha* been 
shown around New York via lunch- 
eons it will be taken to Chicago, De- 
troit. St. Louis, the West Coast and 
other points. 

ABC TV reports it had SI 85 mil- 
lion in time and programing 
(prime evening time) sold for 
the 1961-62 season as of 1 April. 

Last years same date tally: $154 
million, a 20'"* difference 

Net tv sales: General Mills and 
Campbell Soup (both BBD&O) to 
share alternate sponsorship of CBS 
series Fattier of the Bride . . . Mu- 
tual of Omaha (Bozell & Jacobs) 
has bought sponsorship of NBC'j 
Chet Huntley Reporting . . . Reyn- 
olds Metals l Lennen & Newell and 
Clinton Frank) to sponsor The Reyn- 
olds Aluminum Dick Powell Show se- 
ries; Say When, and All-Star Golf, 
all NBC TV, this year. 

Renewal: United States Steel 

1 BBD&O I has renewed The United 
States Steel Hour series for the 1961- 

02 season over CBS. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Wil- 

Ham C. Gillogly, promoted from di- 
rector of sales, ABC TV Central divi- 
sion, to v.p. in charge of sales, ABC. 
Chicago office . . . William Aron- 
son, from television program sales. 
General Artists Corp., to account ex- 
ecutive. ABC Television sales . . . 
Allen Ludden, from director of pro- 
gram services, CBS o&o radio sta- 
tions, to newly created position, con- 
sultant for creative services, CBS 
News . . . John M. Otter, from spe- 
cial program sales staff, to director, 
special program sales NBC TV. 

Representatives j 

Appointments: KROY radio, Sac- 
ramento, Venard, Rintoul & McCon- 
nell in the east, and Torbet, Allen. 
and Crane in the west, effective 1 
April . . . WSVA and WSVA-TV. 



72 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



Harrisonburg, Va., to Clarke Brown, 

Dallas, Tex., from H-R. 



PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Prem 
M. Kapur joins H-R staff as tv ac- 
count executive; a native of India, 
and graduate of Cambridge and Bom- 
bay, he was formerly with WCAU- 
TV, Philadelphia, ITC, NBC Films, 
the Indian Diplomatic Service, the 
United Nations, and the Ford Motor 
Company . . . John P. McWeeny 
appointed account executive in the 
Chicago office of Storer Television 
Sales, a newly formed unit; Mc- 
Weeny previously served with Ed- 
ward Petry; J. Walter Thompson; 
Veedham, Louis & Brorby, and Young 
& Rubicam — all in Chicago. 



Film 



Coverage of the nation's tv mar- 
kets by new properties in syndi- 
cation reaches as high as 93% in 
the case of Ziv-UA. 

Study of three new shows, Sea 
Hunt, Lock Up, and Miami Under- 
cover reveals that sales have been 
nade in all but 7 per cent of the na- 
jion's 269 markets. 

By comparison the figure for Ziv- 
jJA a year ago was 91 per cent. 

V stepped-up advertiser and tv 
jroadcaster demand for cartoon 
•ommercials has triggered a 
iarge-scale expansion and reor- 
ganization program at Sturm 
Studios, according to the com- 
»anv's new president, Harold 
ilackett. 

Hackett, who took over the presi- 

:ency of the 12-year-old commercial 

roduction firm's new company last 

/eek, is a veteran in broadcasting: 

br 19 years he was v.p. in charge of 

adio and tv for Music Corporation 

f America; from 1953 to 1960, he 

as Official Films president and 

•oard chairman; for the past year he 

as with Program Sales. 

Other officers elected with Hackett: 

aymond Junkin, executive v.p.; Wil- 

am Sturm, v.p.; Oreste Calpini, sec- 

'tary; and George Richfield, treas- 

|rer. 

I New company plans include the in- 
Uguration of other divisions to be 
mcerned with: the acquisition of 
ickagers programs series; the estab- 



lishment of full syndication sales and 
service operations; and the develop- 
ment of live and film programs. 

New cartoon techniques are also 
being developed. 

Sales: Seven Arts Warners Films of 
the 50's to WJBK-TV. Detroit; 
KGMB, Honolulu, and WDAF-TV, 
Kansas City . . . Screen Gems re- 
ports $2,067,000 earnings for six 
months ending December 1960, com- 
pared to $1,147,000 in 1959, with 
profits of $970,000 compared to 
7,000 for the earlier period . . . 



Screen Gems' The Web to WNBC-TV, 
New York; national distribution of 
the off-network re-run begins shortly. 

International: South American and 
Latin American rights to Rocky and 
His Friends awarded to Magnum Tv 
International; show is to be dubbed 
into Spanish and Portuguese. 

Programs: Moulin Studios of 

San Francisco is producing Santa's 
Village, a 52-week half-hour color se- 
ries, one of the first tv series ever 
produced in the Bay Area. 



GET THAT EXTRA 




PUSH 



You know that it's the extra push that makes the difference 
between an average campaign and a "Red-Letter Success." 
You get that EXTRA PUSH when you buy WOC-TV 
WOC-TV effectively specializes in co-ordinating and mer- 
chandising your buy at every level — the broker, whole- 
saler,- direct salesman, key buyer as well as the retail outlet. 

This "togetherness" sells products in the nation's 47th TV 
market. More than 2 billion dollars in retail sales ring on 
the retailer's cash register Over 438,000 TV homes are 
within the 42 counties of WOC-TV's coverage area. 



To the National Advertiser, 
WOC-TV offers the greatest 
amount of local programming — 
over 33 hours each week — and 
the finest talent in the area put 
these programs across. 

Your PGW Colonel has all the 
facts, figures and other data as 
well as day by day availabilities 
See him today. 



w 


PRESIDENT 

Col B J Palmer 

VICEPRES & TREASURER 

D D. Palmer 


^ 


Ralph Evans 
SECRETARY 

Wm D Wagner 
RESIDENT MANAGER 

Ernest C Sanders 
SALES MANAGER 

Pax Shaffer 


THE QUINT CITIES 


T 


DAVENPORT -1 
BETTENDORF / IOWA 


%/- 


ROCK ISLAND ] 
MOL1NE > ILL. 
EAST MOL1NE J 


channel 



PETERS. GRIFFIN. WOODWARD. INC 
EXCLUSIVE NATIONA" REPRESENTATIVES 



rjB 



'ONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



73 




• MATURE, ESTABLISHED 
PERSONALITIES • AWARD 
WINNING NEWS * EX- 
CLUSIVE HELICOPTER 
TRAFFIC REPORTS • 
FIGHTING EDITORIALS • 
ADULT MUSIC • 



w 



THE STATION OF THE STARS 
CALL GILL-PERNA, INC. 



Commercials: Videotape Produc- 
tion* of New York completed four 
commercials at three remote locations 
for I AM (D-F-S) and Chemical Bank 
New York Trust Company 1B&B1 
during the last week of March. Pro- 
ducer fbi the respective agencies 
were Si Merrill i B&B i and Dave 
Davidow (D-F-S) . . . MGM-TV 
commercial division will produce 
four color commercials at Culver Citj 
for Eastman Kodak for network use 
on Ed Sullivan and Ozzie and Har- 
riet. 

Promotion: A mechanical version 
of Fred Flintstone. animated charac- 
ter star of Screen Gems' The Flint- 
stones, will appear at 50 ABC affili- 
ates, first two being WBKB-TV, Chi- 
cago, and WITI-TY. Milwaukee. 



PEOPLE ON THE MOVE : Paul 

Kassander appointed national sales 
director of Animation Center. New 
York commercials subsidiary of Felix 
the Cat Creations . . . Frank Ste- 
phan to v.p. national sales director 
of Van I'raag Productions . . . Wil- 
liam L. Clark to Peter M. Roebeck, 
\eu York, as v.p. of western opera- 
lions and sales in Los Angeles . . . 
David Bloom appointed general 
sales manager of Hollywood Televi- 
sion Service division of Republic 
Corp. . . . Kirk Torney to Seven 
\ its Associated in New York as sta- 
tion representatives sales director. 

Pierre Salinger, news secretary 
to President Kennedy, and tv per- 
sonalities Garry Moore and Sam 
Levenson are attending WABC 
public service programing con- 
ference in Pittsburgh this week. 
Salinger was slated to discuss Free- 
dom on Information, while Moore to 
talk about mass communications and 
Levenson discussed humor in mass 
communications. Among main oth- 
ers participating in the conferences 
are Oscar Katz. Marva Mamies. Fred 
Coe, Dr. Bernard Bcrelson. Lou 
Hausman, Henr) Schachte, Mrs. Elea- 
nor Roosevelt. Dr. Allen S. Whiting. 
\\ illiam Stevenson, Harry Ellis, 
Colun Legum. Rod MacLeish. Dr. 
Zbigniev Brzezincki. Harry Murk- 
land. Gov. David Lawrence. Russel 



Lynes, Dr. Frank Baxter, Albert Mc- 
Cleery, Dr. William Cole, FCC com- 
missioner Robert T. Bartle\. Jo 
Mielziner, Robert Drew. Erwin D. 
Canham. Julian Goodman, and Dr. 
\\ illuir Schramm. 

Conferences are in Pittsburgh, ex- 
tending from 9 to 12 April. WBC 
stations are WBZ-AM-TV. Boston;] 
KYWAMTV, Cleveland: KDKA- 
AM-TV. Pittsburgh: KP1Y San 
Francisco: WJZ-TV. Baltimore* 
WIND. Chicago: KEX. PortlandJ 
Ore.; and WOWO, Fort Wayne. 

Public service in action: 

• KTRH, Houston, cooperatl 
with local civil defense authorities 
promote "Operation Survival" stai 
ing 8 April. 

• K GO-TV, San Francisco, 
show a series of public service s] 
announcements in April to help 
youth of the Bay Area in obtaining 
jobs; films were made b\ Frank 
Robinson and video tapes by Gordon 
Waldear 

• WTIG, Massillon, Ohio, did 
direct broadcasts from nearbs North 
Lawrence to mark arrival of that \il- 
lage's new fire truck, purchased 
through the collection of tax and trad- 
ing stamps and other communitv ef- 
forts. 

• KAKE-TV, Wichita. Kansas,! 
in honor of the state's centennial ha? 
started Expedition Kansas, a 13-seg-, 
ment series highlighting historical 
and geographical events around the t 
state. 



Kudos: KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh. 

winner of a DuPont award, will use 
the $1,000 prize money to further 
the college education of an area 
\outh. Last vear's Thomas Alva EdL 
son prize won by the station, alsoi 
$1,000. was given over to Edward E. 
Rohrer, Jr.. of Wilkinsburg. Pa., to 
further his studies at Indiana State 
Teachers College. At that time the 
station arranged to form a commit 
tee of school officials to select the 
most eligible high school student tj 
enable him to continue to college . 
WFMY-TV. Greensboro. N. (... r 
cipient of School Bell Award from 
the North Carolina Education Vssfl 
ciation for its program Channel \ 
Reports: The Ones Who Quit, and f<> 
"'distinguished and outstanding inter 
pretative reporting on education 



74 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 196! 



1 




TEST YOUR MARKETING SKILL 

ON THIS FIVE-FINGERED 

TELEVISION QUIZ 




Q — Which television station in 
the sports-loving Eastern 
Michigan area has a ham- 
mer lock on wrestling 
shows? 



Q — How many men are on a 
baseball team and how 
many outs are in each in- 
ning? 

Q—Can WN EM-TV sell cars? 



Q — Two men play five games 
of chess and each wins five 
games. How come? 

Q — What station serving Flint- 
Saginaiv-Bay City and all 
of Northeastern Michigan 
is a real "homebody"? 




WBAB, Babylon, N. Y., presented 
with these awards : Outstanding Serv- 
ice from the Continental Air Com- 
mand of the U.S.A.F. ; Certificate of 
Appreciation from Long Island's 
Mitchell Air Force Base; National 
Foundation efforts recognition; and 
Knights of Pythias, Sunrise Lodge 
844 Unlimited Thanks scroll . . . 
WJBK, Detroit, recipient of Out- 
standing Series award by the Detroit 
Educational Television & Radio Coun- 
cil for its News Analysis program. 

Trade Pates 

The current surge of retailer in- 
terest in tv fashion showings is 
largely responsible for the ex- 
pansion of TvB's sales clinics to 
18 sessions this year, according 
to TvB's v.p. for local sales How- 
ard P. Abrahams. 

The clinic dates and meeting 
places : 

2 May, Penn Sheraton, Pittsburgh. 
4 May, Marriot Key Bridge, Wash- 
ton. 

9 May, Statler-Hilton, Buffalo. 
11 May, Sheraton Plaza, Boston. 
16 May, Hotel Utah & Motor Lodge, 
Salt Lake City. 

18 May, Multnomah, Portland. 
23 May, Mark Hopkins, San Fran- 
cisco. 

23 May, Sheraton Gibson, Cincin- 
nati. 

25 May, Sheraton West, Los Angeles. 
25 May, Bel Air Motor Hotel, St. 
Louis. 

30 May, Robert Meyer, Jacksonville. 
1 June, Barringer, Charlotte. 
6 June, Leamington, Minneapolis-St. 
Paul. 

8 June, Ambassador, Chicago. 
13 June. Sheraton Fontenelle, Omaha. 
15 June, Skirvin, Oklahoma City. 
20 June, Granada, San Antonio. 
22 June, Royal Orleans, New Or- 
leans. 

Other trade dates: 

4-7 May, 10th American Women in 
Radio and Tv, anniversary conven- 
tion, Statler-Hilton Hotel, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Keynote speaker: NAB 
president, LeRoy Collins. 
21-23 May, Pennsylvania Association 
of Broadcasters, annual convention, 
Nittany Lion Inn, State College, 
Pa. ^ 




OUR CHANNEL 5 WHIZ IS 

ROBERT C. MILLER YOUR 

PETRYMAN IN DALLAS 




A— WNEM-TV, Channel 5, 
with its popular Motor City 
Wrestling shoio, Saturdays 
at 1:00 pm. 

A — Nine men on a team — six 
outs in each inning (three 
for each team) . 

A — It sure can! More than 285 
million dollars were spent 
for cars last year in the rich 
25-county area served by 
WNEM-TV. 

A — They weren't playing each 
other. 

A — The Nov. Neilsen shows 
that WNEM-TV, Channel 
5, reaches more homes in 
Flint - Saginaw - Bay City, 
and the entire dollar-rich 
Northeastern Michigan 
market, than any other sta- 
tion in the area. And only 
Channel 5 hits home in all 
leading time periods. 




ONSOR 



10 APRIL 1961 



75 





It can't be . . . 



But it is! 






It really is I 



Yes, it really is! 





What a satisfaction . . . 



a good biscuit is! 



::. 



•jj 



"~^,r~~-?> 



?eally, it's pretty wonderful when 
tou stop to think ... a commercial 
o reach a consumer who hasn't a 
:ent to his name! 

"So what!", the experts said, 
Jrawingoutthe "what." "We'll sell 
people. Man (Woman, too) is Dog's 
best friend, has money, can buy. 
"We'll use animation to show 
Jog's growing excitement ... as he 
;niffs ... as he downs a Milk-Bone 
Jog Biscuit in nothing flat. That will 
get Man . . . he'll shell out— but quick. 
"Of course, animation means 
ilm— and only film. But that's fine 
lecause film alone will give us the 
ind of commercials we want, the 
/oy we want them — and when." 

And that's not all. Film, and film 
lone, gives you the optical effects 
ou must have . . . assures you the 
onvenience, coverage, and pene- 
ation that today's total marketing 
squires. All reasons why so many 
dvertisers are turning (and return- 
Hg) to film. 

For more information, write 

Motion Picture Film Department 

ASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

Rochester 4, N. Y. 

East Coast Division 

342 Madison Avenue 
New York 1 7, N. Y. 

Midwest Division 

130 East Randolph Drive 

Chicago 1, III. 

West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 

or W. J. German, Inc. 

gents for the sale and distribution of 
astman Professional Motion Picture 
Ims, Fort Lee, N. J., Chicago, III., 
Hollywood, Calif. 

DVERTISER: 

National Biscuit Company 
IGENCY: 

Kenyon & Eckhardt Inc. 
RODUCER: 
l>bert Lawrence Animation, Inc. 








Glenn Gilbert has been appointed man- 
ager of AM Radio Sales' Detroit office. He 
comes to AM Radio Sales from Avery- 
Knodel where, for the past five years, he 
has been office manager of the company's 
office in Detroit. Prior to his affiliation 
with Avery-Knodel, Gilbert was a mem- 
ber of the Katz Agency sales team, also in 
Detroit. Earlier, he was sales executive at 
WGAR, Cleveland. A native of East Cleveland, Ohio, Gilbert began 
his career in the commercial department of American Tel. & Tel. 

William F. Schnaudt, general sales man- 
ager of Beacon Broadcasting's Hartford, 
Conn., radio station WKNB since Decem- 
ber 1958, has been named manager of the 
station. He replaces Norton Virgien who 
has left the broadcasting industry. Prior 
to his affiliation with WKNB, Schnaudt 
was with W1CO, Salisbury, Maryland, a 
former Beacon property. He entered the 
industry in 1939 after graduation from Fordham U. and has held 
positions with WPAT, Paterson, N. J. and WPTR, Albany, N. Y. 

Miss Beulah Funk, a member of the Blair 
Television Associates sales development 
staff since 1957, has been promoted to di- 
rector of sales development. To her new 
assignment, Miss Funk brings a back- 
ground of wide experience in broadcasting 
and in film programing for television. For 
the past four years, as sales development 
staffer, she specialized in the preparation 
of station sales material and program promotion. She was assist- 
ant film manager at WOR-TV, N. Y. and in sales service there. 

Franklin Sisson has been appointed man- 
ager of radio station WWJ, Detroit. For- 
merly local sales manager of Grand Rapids. 
Mich., television station WOOD-TV, Sisson 
began his broadcasting career at WKLA, 
Ludington. From there he went to radio 
station WOOD as program director. A pop- 
ular platform speaker, Sisson appeared with 
the touring panels of the BMI Clinics dis- 
cussing station programing and promotion. He is a past president of 
the Grand Rapids Optimist Club and chairman of their convention. 



77 





frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Though the technicians maintain that it isn't the size of the sample but the 
quality of the method that matters in taking a rating, nothing bothers buyers 
and sellers of ratings so much as sample size. In this piece, Jay Victor, 
who heads a Newark, V ./.. agency oj that name, proposes an independent 
audit of rating services in the New York market by using students from 
the many colleges in the area to sample around 80,000 homes. This, he 
says, would keep the cost of validation low, and provide believable data. 




Needed: large-sample validation of the ratings 



I he over-all "image" of the rating services is at an all- 
time low. Their methods are under attack, the size of their 
sampling ridiculed, their projections disputed, their in- 
tegrity maligned and comments on the final figures (espe- 
ciallj when they are unfavorahle I range the gamut from 
"inadequate" to downright "dishonest." 

I m not here to lake sides. But 1 do helieve the time 
has come for both advertiser and broadcaster to demand 
that some proof he forthcoming to corroborate (.11 that 
the samplings arc in truth, adequate; (2 I that the ethnic 
composition is accurate; (3) that the income level sam- 
plings are in proportion with the latest available figures; 
i !•) and most important, that a projection of some 800 or 
1.000 names into 15 million really works. 

1 have an idea to prove this out and a way to put it into 
practice as well. / propose a completely independent 
audit. And before anyone hegins shouting "It's expen- 
sive!" I suggest that the plan I have will be most eco- 
nomical in the bargain. This independent audit would not 
reach a mere 800 doorknobs hut could be closer to 80,000 
homes per sur\e\. \nd this one hundred-fold projection 
would prove, beyond question, whether the services are 
actual!) close to the mark or not worth the paper they're 
printed on at all. 1 think I lie time is here for a showdown. 
Ever) other set of circulation figures has some independ- 
ent audit win not radio and tv? Advertisers and agencies 
have a right to demand this and rating services, which 
have faith in their methods, should be willing to put their 
product on the line. 

["he idea came to me while I was perusing a partial list 
of the main colleges that Sourish in the 17-county greater 
New York area. It appears to me that there are over 50 
• d them. I -litest that the presidents of all these institu- 
lions I..- approached with the idea of joining forces to 



78 



make an annual independent audit of every rating service 
in the market. I don't mean looking into their books. I 
mean testing their methods. Every college would allocate 
X number of students. The rating services would be asked 
to furnish each college with a list of questions identical to 
those they give their own people and furnish the identical 
methods of questioning as well. All other things would be 
equated, too (like ethnic composition, income level group- 
ings, etc.), to the satisfaction of all interests concerned. 

Every college would be allocated an area, would make 
its own survev, would tabulate its own figures and funnel 
all the results into one central point. When all the figure? 
were in. final computations would be made, then stacked 
against the figures of the rating service itself. 

All things being equal, the final evidence should stain 
on its own. With the exception of Nielsen (whose s\siem 
I believe, offers the tiniest sampling of them all in greatei 
New York I. every major method could be explored in tht 
17-county metropolitan area. What the results prove ou 
here will determine the next steps to be taken. Whethe 
the final comparisons wind up odious or otherwise, I guai 
antee they should be interesting. 

Fees should he modest. I have approached no college bu 
my feeling is that many might he willing to help in tli 
project as a public service or perhaps for some free si 
time thrown in for recruitment. If a little larger -in 
should he needed, all interested parties should contribut 
on some mutually agreeable basis. 

I would be happy to be part of any committee chow 
to help work this out. 1 believe some sort of independei 
check on ratings is long overdue. Advertisers have a rigl 
lo know what they're buying. Equally, rating servici 
should have a right to prove what they're selling. So lei 
have it. The "truth" will benefit the entire industry. ^ 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 19( 



THANK YOU, CONGRESSMAN OREN HARRIS . 

CHAIRMAN. HOUSE SPECIAL SUBCOMMITTEE ON LEGISLATIVE OVERSIGHT 



ARB wishes to commend you and your committee on the objective and 
non-partisan manner in which the recent comprehensive statistical evalua- 
tion of audience measurement services was conducted. A complete descrip- 
tion and comparison of ARB methodology with that of other services is 
most welcome to us and should be one of the most important research docu- 
ments in our industry. This is especially true because of the outstanding 
qualifications of those who prepared the report. 

While we do not agree in principle with the necessity for Congressional 
inquiry, ARB feels that you have performed a most valuable service for 
the industry. 

We take particular note of one of the committee's major recommenda- 
tions—that which advocates complete disclosure of methodology and 
sample size in each printed report. ARB, and only ARB in the television 
field, has consistently furnished this information fully and clearly in every 
copy of every report. We will continue to do this as well as work toward 
implementing the other recommendations of the committee. 

AMERICAN RESEARCH BUREAU, INC. 




AMERICAN RESEARCH BUREAU, INC. 



WASHINGTON 

NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 

LOS ANGELES 



4320 Ammendale Road, Bellsville. Md., WE 5-2600 
1 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N.Y., JU 6-7733 
1907 Tribune Tower, Chicago 11, III., SU 7-3388 
2460 W. Whittier Blvd., Montebello, Calif., RA 3-8536 



>\S<»R 



10 APRIL 1961 



79 



SPONSOR 



A Puzzling Question 

Recentl) Republican National Chairman, Senator Thraston 
B. Morton issued a strong protest before a Senate subcom- 
mittee, that station WMCA, New York had abused a broad- 
caster*- right to editorialize, by the way in which it had 
backed John K. Kennedy in the campaign last fall. 

Senator Morton attacked particularly WMCA's advertis- 
ing of its political position, though he did not question a 
station's right to endorse a candidate. 

To us this seems a little like evading the real issue. The 
heart of the problem is not how a station backs an individual 
political figure but whether station editorializing should be 
confined, as many broadcasters believe it should, to issues 
rather than personalities. 

It is a very puzzling and difficult question and there has 
never been enough discussion of the point. 

We believe that Peter Straus of WMCA has done the indus- 
try a real service by taking a stand and forcing this whole 
matter out into the open. 

As to the arguments pro and con the practice of endorsing 
candidates, we'll reserve judgment. We'd like to hear more 
from broadcasters and others on this difficult subject. 

Chuck Worcester Specialized in Service 

The recent passing of Chuck Worcester, news director and 
former farm director of the WMT stations, Cedar Rapids, 
in an automobile accident, underscores the debt that radio 
and tv owe to their news and farm specialists. 

We worked with Chuck on many farm projects. He rep- 
resented the best in broadcasting to millions in the wide areas 
served by his stations, as well as throughout the industry. 

("buck's specialty, and it is a specialty of many of the news 
and farm experts, was service. 

Mr was regarded a member of the family by countless 
families throughout the WMT areas. His loss will be keenly 
felt, because, in the finest tradition of broadcasting, he was 
constantly a-king. not "What can I get?*' but "What can 
I give?" 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Mark this down: One of the big 

retailing firms, it is rumored, is set 
to sponsor a Western series next sea- 
son. The title: Colt 44.95. 

Pray ball: They did "Casey at the 
Bat" at N. Y.'s Upstairs at the Down- 
stairs — as a Japanese Kabuki troupe 
might do it. Just before the last 
stanza, an announcer interrupted 
with: "But first, a word about Gir- 
rette Brue Brades." 

Adlai and Al: Doubletalker Al Kelly 
has been nominated (by columnist 
Bob Considine) as a deputy to Gov- 
ernor Stevenson at the U.N. — be- 
cause Kelly proved to the nation on 
tv recently that he had developed 
doubletalk into an even greater art 
form than the Russians. As an ex- 
ample of how he does it, Considine 
quotes an exchange with Happy 
Chandler, then Commissioner of 
Baseball, that took place on a dai.- 
somewhere: "Durocher feltered that 
team like a granlist and didn't de- 
serve the frizzim of the agitativc mi- 
pension," Al declared. "YouV 
a point, there," said the former Ken 
tucky governor, nodding sageh . "I 
you want action, though, you'd betU) 
put in in writing." 

Hoodwinked: We heard about this 
guy who was so influenced by th( 
losers on those tv crime shows se 
in the '20's and '30's that he wen 
out and bought a big, black sedai 
and fixed it so that when he gets ou 
all four doors open at the same timt 

Heritage: CBS TV made a pitch fo 
"the pursuit of excellence" on il 
Great Challenge special, but CBS Rf 
dio beat video to the punch. The ser 
ior web interviewed one Sol Kiel 
man who told this story: "We ha\ 
a fellow. Harold Jaffe, a salan 
stulTer. His father was a salan 
stuffer, his grandfather was a salan 
suffer. His great-grandfather was 
salami stuffer in Germany. This h; 
been handed down as an art. Ar 
this man. he refuses to this ver\ di 
In tie knots at the ends of the salai 
l>\ machine — only by hand. \\< 
adamant. And the irony is. he ci 
lie more salamis by hand than tl 
machines do. But where can you v. 
another Harold Jaffe today?" 



80 



SPONSOR 



10 APRIL 19 




TIME OUT FOR LOGIC 

The combined ages of Mary and Ann are forty-four 
years, and Mary is twice as old as Ann was when Mary 
was half as old as Ann will be when Ann is three times 
as old as Mary was when Mary was three times as 
old as Ann. How old is Mary? * 

Drop us a line before Mary gets much older and if 
you've solved this ageless intricacy we'll provide a 
copy of Dudeney's "Amusements in Mathematics" 
(Dover Publications, Inc., N.Y.) forthwith. If you have 
a copy, say so and we'll provide a different prize. 

* Station break: We missed that last cue too, but WMAL-TV's 
audience probably includes Mary and Ann; it's the biggest in 
the Washington market 6 P.M. to midnight, all week, (ARB 
Dec. '60, and NSI Jan. '61.) 

wmal-tv 

Washington, D. C. 

An Evening Star Station, represented by H-R Television, Inc. 

filiated with WMAL and WMAL-FM, Washington, D. C; WSVA-TV and WSVA, Harrisonburg, Va. 




LEFT TO RIGHT. FARRELL SMITH I 3 P» / BILL OWEN. 4 6 AM / CHARLIE GREER ISTANOING1. 1 1 AM -I PM / SCOTT MUNI. 10 



12 AM / JACK CARNEY. 3 6 30 PM / HERB OSCAR ANOERSON. 6 10 AM / CHUCK OUNAWAY. 7 1510 PM 



THI 

BIG 7 
WING 



New York's Goings 



They're the Swingin 7 from 77.. 
Places Station .. .with the big bright beautiful sound 
of Radio WABC! Hear them every day on Channel 77 
with Your Kind of Music. ..First Person News... 
First Person Features... It's the \J l istening fun \ 
PRING IthesounddilVercnee... ^f^ 

THE SOUND OF NEW YORK RADIO %M wJM f^(f^ 

CHANNEL^"* 



■ 



17 APRIL 1961 
40« a copy* $8 a year 



I 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 




KAD/o 



K-BOX 
IN °ALLAS 
°*»** MO* E 



A *ER 



HO/Me. 



p e* 




^52L*?«! SEX*?*. , 



,n coi 



ao/o. 



OX DEUVERS MORE 

41S/4/V STATIONS in tempo with the-times K-BOX DALLAS \ WIL-ST. LOUIS • WRIT-MILWAUKEE 

J'lananomo. Director So l d Nationally br the Kati Agency \ Sold Nationally by Robert E. Eastman s Co., Inc. 



MEDIA: STILL 
THE AGENCY 
STEPCHILD? 

Although its role has 
boomed, its status and 
pay levels have not 
kept pace say admen 

Page 35 



What's happened 
to Mutual since 
3M took it over? 

Page 38 

Norelco's Fry 
takes off-beat 
tack in video 

Page 40 

Network tv 
client list 
at new peak 

Page 44 



"next to KONO-tv. . . 
• this is the best way 
to get your message 
to the most natives" 







San Antonio's 



Channel 12 



KONO-TV (ABC) gets best results in the Alamo City area with 56.1 Share of 

Audience 1 P.M.-Midnight Sunday through Saturday . .against 22.1 

and 22.5 . . . according to latest San Antonio ARB (Nov. 60) 

Get the "Inside Story' on San Antonio Television 

Represented by the Katz Agency 







Just as important as one's 2nd shoe is 
Michigan's 2nd TV market ... that rich 
industrial outstate area made up of 
LANSING-FLINT-JACKSON and 20 
populous cities . . . 3,000,000 potential 
customers . . . 684,200 TV homes (ARB 
March '60) . . . served exclusively by 
WJIM-TV for 10 years. 



WJIM-TV 



BASIC 




Strategically located to exclusively serve LANSING . . . FLINT. . . JACKSON 
Covering the nation's 37th market. Represented by Blair TV. WJIM Radio by MASLA 






i I ol. 15, Vo. 16 



17 APRIL 1961 



YOU 

ARE 

CORDIALLY 

INVITED 

TO 

VISIT 

THE 

INTERNATIONAL 

SUITE 

AT 

THE 

NAB 

CONVENTION 

You will be surprised 
and delighted! 

G803 
Shoreham 



SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



NEWS: Newsmakei of the Week 6. Sponsor-Scope 23. Sponsor-Week 29, 
Washington Week 59. Film-Scope 60. Sponsor Hears 62. Sponsor-Week \\ rap- 
1 p 64. T\ and Radio Newsmakers 72 

ARTICLES 

Media: still the agency stepchild? 
35 Although ii- value, mlr. and importance have increased tremendous- 
ly, equality in salaries, personnel and in recognition is still lacking 

Mutual and 3M: 12 months later 

38 Although sales are up, Mutual has been concentrating on plowing its 
profits into building up its prestige image. News and sales staff expanded 

Harry Fry: Norelco's ad manager 

40 A look at Norelco's tv-minded advertising-publicity manager Harry Fry, 
who has been experimenting with unorthodox tv drives for last six years 

Baseball's faithful viewer 

42 H" 1 team- get best ratings, but lesser performers notch good scores. 
Spot check shows at least six team- bettered '59 ratings last \ 

Net tv advertiser roster at new peak 

44 376 invested in the medium last year, breaking record of 341 set in 
1956. latest totals include 53 advertisers making their net t\ debut 

Tv zeroes in on Amana's market 

46 Walt Schwimmer's 'Champion Bridge' on ABC TV reaches bigh-im 

fact -conscious audience maker of freezers, air conditioners want- to hit 

DEPARTMENTS: Sponsor Backstage 10. Timebuyers at Work 
16. 49th and Madison 20. Sponsor Asks 48, Tv Results 50, Spot Buys 52, 
Seller's Viewpoint 73. Sponsor Speak- 74, Ten-Second Spots 74 

Officers: editor and publisher, Norman R. Glenn; executive vice pi 
dent, Bernard Piatt: vice president and assistant publisher, Arnold Alpiri 
secretary-treasurer, Elaine Couper Glenn. 

Editorial: executive editor, John E. McMillin; news editor. Ben Bo< 
managing editor. Alfred J. Jafje: senior editor. Jane Pinkerton ; midwest 
tor, Given Smart: film editor, He) ward Ehrlich; associate editor-. Jack Lind- 
rup, Ben Seff, Michael G. Silver, Ruth Schlanger, Diane Schwartz: columnist, 
Joe Csida; art editor, Maury Kurtz: production editor, Frances Giusi 
editorial research, Elaine Johnson. 

Advertising: eastern manager. Willard Dougherty; southern mana 

Herbert M. Martin. Jr.: midwest manager, Paul Blair; western managi 

George G. Dietrich. Jr.: sales service/production, Jo Ganci, Shirley S. Alh 

Barbara Parkinson. 

Circulation: manager. Seymour Weber; reader service, Lynn Cane: k>ir 

jyn (onnell . 

Administrative: assistant to publisher. -S. T. Massimino; office man.i 

ger, Fred Levine; George Becker. Michael Crocco, Sul Gottman, Wilke Rich 

Irene Suhbach. Gernldine Dinch. 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



© 1961 SPONSOR Publications If 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation, an 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St.. New York 17, MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 61 
N. Michigan Av. (Ill, Superior 7-9863. Birmingham Office: 3617 8th Ave. So., FAairfa 
2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Blvd. i28), Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office 
3110 Elm Av.. Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada $9 a year. Othc 
countries $11 a year. Single copies 40c. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd das 
postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 196 



■ 



fou can't say gypsum in a headline, 



or Son of WMT Strikes Back 



Imagine a Fort Dodge station advertising in 
Sponsor. They must be loaded, people will 
say. 



That's a calculated risk we'll have to take, be- 
cause the time has come to tell the world that 
the gypsum one George Hall used to perpetrate 
his "Cardiff giant" canard came from a bed 
just east of Fort Dodge. 

Many a pear-shaped canard has flowed under 
the bridge since 1868, when Hall carved his 
hunk of gypsum and buried it in Onondaga 
County, New York. One we'd like to de-hoax 
forthwith goes something like this: "Who 
needs a daytimer in the county seat of 
Webster County, 85 mi N by W of the state 
capital, located on the picturesque Des Moines 
River, served by four railroads, an airline, 
and assorted highways, with a large trade in 
grain, gypsum and clay products, with a com- 
mission form of government, that was named 
after Col. Henry Dodge (1782-1867)?" 

You do, if you want to fill the gap left by 
the signals of stations on the periphery of our 
North-Central Iowa coverage area. Slop-over's 
fine for hog pens but it's no way to cover the 
big state of Iowa, where people live every- 
where. This is a job for coverage stations like 
K-WMT, whose 5,000 watts, newly acquired, 
push the 2 mv/m line past Iowa's western and 
southern boundaries, and make our 0.5 mv 



daytime coverage area the largest of any sta- 
tion in Iowa. 

Lagniappe: Advertisers running schedules on 
K-WMT concurrently with schedules on WMT 
can combine to earn frequency discount on 
K-WMT. 

K-WMT 

Represented by Everett-McKinney. Inc. 

540 kc • Iowa's finest frequency • 5,000 watts 

Mail Address: Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Affiliated with 

WMT AM & TV, Cedar Rapids— Waterloo; 

WEBC, Duluth. 




PONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



IN MADISON 




• Now in 1st place 6 p.m. to mid- 
night (Mon. thru Fri). WKOW- 
TV increased its share of audience 
by 32%. (ARB-Madison Metro— 
Nov. 1959; Nov. I960). 

• In just 12 months the 2nd station 
lost 12°o and the third station lost 
16°o in share of audience. 

• WKOW-TV noon to 3 p.m. 
increased by 33%; and from 3 p.m. 
to 6 p.m. audience doubled. 

• 6 of the top 10 shows are on 
WKOW-TV. 

• The audience has switched to 
WKOW-TV! Now is the time for 
you to consider and reconsider. For 
1st place sales power switch your 
pitch to WKOW-TV. 



WKOW-TV 

and 10,000-watr WKOW-AM 



TONY MOE, 

Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 

Represented nationally by 

THE BOILING CO. 

In Minneapolis by 

WAYNE EVANS & ASSOC. 

liill'H'l 




Midcontineni Broadcasting Croup 

WKOW-AM and TV Madison • KELO-LAND TV and 
RADIO Sioux Falls, S. 0. • WLOL-AM, FM Min- 
neapolis-St. Paul • KSO RAOIO Des Moines 



' 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Pierre Salinger, press secretary to President Kennedy and 
nationally famed news purveyor, turned into a neivsmaker 
last tveek in Pittsburgh as he addresed 400 broadcast execu- 
tives attending the fourth annual W estinghouse Broadcast- 
ing Co. public service conference. Speaking informally, he 
commended broadcasters for their cooperation, urged more. 

The newsmaker: Pierre Salinger was alternately serious 
in his assertions, bemused by questions from his audience, and hap- 
pily pacified with a cigar at the opening day luncheon of the WBC 
conference last Monday. 

Joviality was combined with hard-hitting sincerity as he com- 
mended the progress in coverage of Governmental and political 
events "'during the past six months" and asked broadcasters to do 
two things: 

1. Pay more attention to the Presidential press conference by 
carrying "full text" — making each one 

available to citizens regularly and in com- 
plete form; 

2. Pay less attention to the "trivial," 
which he sees as "a continuing trend in the 
communications field over the past few 
years." 

He commented on "a disturbing trend" 
in networks and stations not carrying the 
full Presidential press conference and 
urged broadcasters' re-appraisal of policy. 
The conference, he said, is "not a network or a commercial show 
It's a significant news event," and as such should be available to i 
maximum national audience. 

He decried claims that the President would be "over-exposed" ii 
such a continuing series of tv and radio reports. Said Salingei 
"the President isn't comparable to a juggler or a comic: he can't b< 
over-exposed." Over-exposure isn't a danger, but the trend t<> tli 
trivial IS. 

He sees the trivial "beginning to assume proportions of impoi 
tance" — with the trivial concerning such information as the type i 
shampoo or soap used in the White House, the color of the Fin 
Lady's stationery. 

These examples of omission and commission, he warned tli 
broadcasters, add up to a waste of communication channels. " I 
clog them with anything other than the most important is a wasl 
of time and talent." Communications, in his view, can help solve tl 
two most pressing problems of today: "how to better inform an 
educate our own people as well as the international community. ' 

Si i linger is regarded by his news colleagues as a special breed ■ 
communications expert; though only 35, he has been a journals 
editor-researcher since 1942, a political observer since 19 Id. # 




Fierre Salinger 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 19( 



J 



Why WINK-TV 

bought Warner's "Films of the 50's'.' 

Says Joe Bauer: 

"Every year we scour the market for better and better 
feature films for our sponsored Thursday night 'Variety 
Theatre'. With literally thousands of films to choose 
from, we decided the Seven Arts package is 



"The sponsor is convinced his show is 
Fort Myers audience the best feature film entertain- 
ment that money can buy." 

Warner's Films of the 50's , . . Money makers of the BO's 




SEVEN ARTS 

ASSOCIATED 

CORP. 



NEW YORK: 270 Park Avenue 
CHICAGO: 8922-D La Crosse, Skokie. 
DALLAS: 5641 Charlestown Drive 
BEVERLY HILLS: 232 Reeves Drive 



YUkon 61717 

OR 4-5105 

ADams 9-2855 

GRanite 6-1564 



For list of TV stations programming Warner's Films of 
the 50's see Page One SRDS (Spot TV Rates and Data) 




ashington 



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tr. 40x100 Value 
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t owl ot the mac 

space In It foi 

•1 4 bedrms anC 

orient and shinj 

from top to bot 

aicr heating Ci 

washer, dryrr 



si- w 



COriAOVI Ne« 1-bedrwi Cap*, b.ut 

for Executive but unused Fleldstone 

trim beautifully landscaped. Adjacent 

to schools. Ha A shopping $17 200 

Musi ere to appreciate Owner 

4-4374 .9 i Mon to Frl) 



Lo 



- -t parts of to< 
to L1RR Horn 
another a- <m 

$12 490 THOMAJ 



Bhd BA 5-8500 



Oregon 



CONOMY 



■arbesjuc pit A 
rug.-cd stone 



bedri 



muit 



M 



.. Uir BOVDd, 
Topping this 
ton* A brick 
needs repair" 
EAf B-nlKikV 



«b CENTER HALL 

NCH-ALL STONE 



ir: rear patio at- 

h costly hedges; 

i In one of the 

••sired sections. 

IEALTY 

Uvd. BA 5-5*00 



VH'TESTON 

ich. car. 1Vj bitr 
000 154-63 13IN 
1-92OT; PL 9-3*41. 



ouse on 8.000 so, 

location. 

.hstn HI 5-0701 



-2 fam brick 



od 2 fas*. 3 raa 
baths, choice cor 
36.000 NE 4-640C. 



•an M«ch. «•■!•«. 
tbestoe shlnvle 7 
bsml oil heat. 
i&2 or WH 3-7177 
BUCU BLOCK 
VMILY 
Apartment 
:h IWTH ST 

f. rr.il> 



M 



NE 1-7400 



i ttlk, brk. 7 rmv 
j maimer rental* 
■ 1J Ne ponslt A.r 
rirLD 

applications 

t vacancies 

ROOMS 

beeti k 1 1 
PUsyonl 4-1V5 

• MAN 

ncdiate occupancy 
>usce. stores 
berty Road 

PVBWOj * IMS 



Homes— Idaho 



Cedorhurs -$23,500. Mdrnzd 

4 bedroom Colonial. Needs nomine but 

a family to irve in it L 

fireplace dining room, coun 

laundry * S bar. 

spacious Full basement, attic. Low 

lasts principals only 



IIIH MHK> l-faaail» ( •l.nial 

oeJrn.t maid i rm 2S baths Coi 
pleteljr modern Nr MM >•' 
Reduced I o 125 000 Leaving stale L 
llan L Mitchell FA l-«7y. 



UiHM)tH\ 2*(aaillr. C»*lee lac a 

■m apt* availaMr 
come A K £ $31 SrJO. UUian L Mitciirl 
FA 7-67W FR 1-18A 



Cedorhurs ChormingColonial 

8 rm i bath, rec modernized: JJ5.000 

BOl MMIM ISraal 3 bdrwa. J ewaa- 
piete oatm 2 car far, attic A bamnt 
Well landscaped. Principals only. CE 
MM 

HiilMMRV 3 rsa Cape, krtrk A 
asbetr i orad end iirrel full bunt A 
attic Many estrai 315 BOO MO 7-8U2 
ROI NUARl T rsa i»m. ■/*• farn, 
Carafe Carpel. Appliances. Storms. 

Screen* Fences. MO 7-2W69. 

HIM Mi WW - t haraalnc 

CultaCe in wooded area, completely 

f untuned Fireplace 1 bedrooms Plot 

1601100 >4 mile »-rimmlnc. boatlnc 

fishinc Price 312 000 Call Moa-Frl 

ilj 



Homes— Wyoming 



JM»t K-B>aa 



DARIE COlMRAWArlDV QUCSTfl 

1»« COLONIAL— J STORY-wllh 5 
bedr«ims. 3 bathi. Dehfhtful with 
u Hit. Utht ano 
airy. Acre plus. 

j, - tot 

19M HO^PITABI.E COLONIAL-Spa- 
clous in and out. * douMr 
and one sinfle— 4 baths. Beautlfu 
playroom 1st (l xtr. Over an acre 
with Sound view 

365.000 
19*0 1- FLOOR COUNTRY HOME on 
an acre plus Unutuat details foi 
cracioui livinc and entertainlnc 3 
bedcu-mi 2S elaborate tile bath- 
rrjnmi 1 fireplace! TaJlOr- 
maJe kitchen mv>dernly equipped 
Much to admire— a cem to own. 
MS.OM 
I i_C" i Mn Drive opp P O. OL 5-149 7 
>\Kll FrletaiUesI Yt t*ee Area 

r>* nun ricel schl church, shoo end 
train Charm newly paintr j 
3 bdrms. 1'- bth w, m crpt cust drapes 
1 bsernent A attic If Indurpe yd Belm 
r rannferrrrl l»w 30 t Owner OL 5-373 T 
MRIL i-yr old Cape. 4 Ice bdrms. 
2 baths walk beach. $39 000. 
■ 
JARIr -HIUIIML COLON I Al »>\ 
ACRE IN 2 ACRE ZONE $42 000 
P REA LTY OL 5-4412. 
DARIE talll Ranch. 3 bedrms. IM 

bths acre 2-car car $47,500 

ROSS P. WILKIN'S OL 5-9759 

.574 Post Rd Darle OLIvcr 5-1443 

Established Over 30 Years 
IEMBER DARIE BOARD REALTOR.' 



Homes— Nevada 



LOIDON 



JUST LISTED 



custo 



>ne year old Co- 
lonial, r/anoramic view ( L. L 
Sound. 4 bedrms. 2*-, baths, de- 
lude kitctun Dry basemcnl-po- 
; Uyroom. J car tar. At- 
tractive plantincs. Transferred 
owner. $42,500. 
Sun by appt. Mrs. Lawrence OL 5-2152 

LOUDON Commuting Colonial spill 
over Sic ) bdrms. 2 tiled baths. Hv 
m. fpl. Dminc ell. scr. porch A-l kit 
'anrlled family rm On dead end circle 
34.900. 

Complete descriptions by mat! 
Shown only ny 



•SOiUJ 



ntr 



elecant Southrn Colonial intccratlnc 
cenerous proportions A cxcellenl 
conn ruction. Lir^e < nlranct f-iyer 
living rm. fireol separate dinlnc 
rm. extra special kitchen w built- 
Ins. breakfast area A laundry, 
family rm w/slldinc cla^ 
patio dm. 4 t 

basement, fa rates On level IS 
acres with tomrnunily swimminic 
lake $48 900 

DEER PARK. 3 rm Cape, brick . 

asbestos dead end street, full bsmt & 

attic Many estras $15 BOO MO 7-8112 



HM K PABK 1 ■ 
garace. Carpet. 
Screens Fences. 



n wpllt. f/so furn 
Appliances. Storms 
MO 7-2869. 



BAST IIAMn - l harminc 

cottage In wooded area, complete)} 
fumiihed Fireplace 2 bedrooms Plot 
l&OxlOO Vk mile s*imrmnc. boating 
flihing Price 312 000. Call Moo-Frl 
9 :, NYC El 5-3418 



MM MMllON. Ar.hlteetural cem. $ 

spacious rms. Ilv rm 32x16. oil heal 

Sound view. Beach rights. A* acre 

319 000 TR 3-7448. 



In 



it 



DUmont 5-595T 



ricisalve 14. IW, 
rnic estate, mat 
HI Fein Brewster 

\ in. BftT"iD~" 
ractlve rooms 
Moderate rental' 



alifornia 



I -. (.AUDI S M-l 
beautirully furn 
ummrl, DC 7-24C f 
KIWR Kl> 
$110 
.1 or BE 7-571- 



Sryn Nur Rid. 
entra' A*r l p i 
nr SP 9-^7* 



•.rsa a»i ii twd 

nodern t*u:h1i t 
I5_WO_l 5*25 
mo. t at em Ut 
"ruaton Apta. 

DE 7- 0240 

.< ■ fim Id (Ti 
to Bron rllla |U 

7, . . 

CAaanevy lt« A 

y 2-family frame 
100; erected prior 
rant Asking 112 - 
a back mtgc for 

Times 

' kfkk >llk ilnrr 
ipis Excel cond. 



BELLMORE 319000 6 yr old spilt 
all car. 7 Ig rm. cov patio, extras 
316 SO0 exist mtc Save fees 

E HfMPSTEAD $17 500 oversid 
Cape. 8 yr old. 4 bdrm sep din rm 
btmt. del gar. pallo newly decor. 

lILVfSTEAD. E $16,000 brk A 
shngl Cape. 2 bdrm + fam rm ex- 
pansion, bsml. gar. extras city sewers. 



Homes — Montana 



iiO-FOI m vin $::.*•• 

High Rise Ranch with 4 bedrms. IS 

' hs. formal dm rm 18x24 panld run 

i gar Model at 6th SI A Newbridge 



imtltoi It Lakrvllle EaUlei Ranth, 
121 500 3 bdrms. 2 bth. full bsmt. 
tt screened In breeieway A tar. At- 
tic fan. all applncs. many extras tncl. 
2nd cr Take over 4t CI mtge. Won- 
lJ neighbors IV 9-924X 



I \ST i; vKimh II 64 ro»m tenler hall 
Ranch, finished basement. 2-ione 
heating, w. w carpeting. alr-condi- 
tloner. attached caragc patio large 
shade tr«es A many extras. Principals 
.323 500 IV 1-0643 



K.BARBOIR Laavr*llle Ranch 3 bed- 
rms carace. covered patio fin bsmt. 
w-w carpet slrms A scrns dishwasher, 
washer a dr ei >K I CI mtgc. $22,500. 
principals only IV 3-2003. 
LAsfTTvItllol i! I \l Rlss-Larce Spill 
..:m»fi;i basemt garace 
prii-k A CodauT Terrific neighborhood! 
31S 990 EXPRESS REALTY. 1790 Hemp- 
• i»»d T. ... IV 3-9681 . 

LAST IUHHOl K 319.4*4 

ALL-BRICK RANCH 
y 4 Acre - 2-car Gar - 2 Bths 

THE BUY OF A LIFETIME ' No «*C- 
geratlon-* 10-yr-old All -Brick Ranch 
worth many thousands more! On Vacre 
nursery grounds, features 6 enormous 
rms incl large din rm eat-In kitchen 



red bedn 



fog 



REDUCED FROM $23,500! 



LAST IIVHIIUIR brlek. 3 bdrm. etr 
hall ranch, newly dec. new carpeting, 
tany extras. 60x100 landscaped, end 
orch. schl. shop $16,500. SU 1-2086 



EAST UARimi It Cape Co4. 8 jh. S 

family rm patio. Ire shade 
trees storms, screens 20' dormer, ask- 
ng $19 000 IV 1-0238 



MsT BARBOUR, Sabarban (Jreer* 

Top location 7-rm Split IS bths 

huge playrm bsmt. gar. covered brl 

Extras PE 16133 



t AST II"""" ><-J- Martin Del Rio. 
7 room ranch den furnished base- 
ment, extras. 429 900 IV 6-6879 



y MARLCOPA bedrm ranch. 2 blhs 
2"-car gar 2-/one ht finished bo;mt 
alr-cond rrfric a fortune In extras 
4" mlc Sr0»» PY 6-7822. 



EAST Mf'ADO Joseph Martin Del Rio 
spacious ranch, centrally air cond 
fin basemt. 2 patios w/w carpeting 
many extras $31,000 IV 3-1454. 



E MEADO Lkvlle Rch. Real S*mnr 

Pool, llvlne rm w'fpl 2 Mstr Bdrms 

Plus 2 Bed Pine Panld Den. 2 Bths. Fin 

Bsmt. Car. $23 500- IV 9-9444. 



E Mr A[M> solid brk 7 rm*. 24 bath* 
St level, 2-car gar. storms screens 
applla"c*s beaut ww carptg. landscap- 
ing $28000 IV 1-6244. 



EAST MEADO -4 bedrm all Brick 

Cape. 1>-j baths full bsmt manv 
extras, immaculate, sn.500 IV 9-0612 



E MEADO Lee. modern brk. 7 rms 
ctr hall, din rm. bsmt att car. prch 
U ac. Extras. 320 700 IV 1-2280. 



E. NORTIIPORT— Transferred Assume 
•*&| CI mtge Cape Cod 7 rms. 2 
complete MM glassed-in tubs M--dn 
kitchen din rm "* rm -l'h mahogany 
panel inc. mural paper, built -In cabinets 
fireplace •atousfed breeieway att gar 
Alum storms screens Full bsmt built- 
in storage space 20xi5 patio Fenced 
In area. acre FHA value S21 000 

Owner selling at $21,000 Principals 

only FOrest 8-OTK 

E NORTMPORT-a-rm Cape. W acre" 
m baths car. full bsmt alr-condl- 
t loner decorator shades patio walk 
to RR. schools, churches. Asking 
518.500. FO 8-1853 



E MEADO Lge. modern brk. 7 rms 

ctr hall din rm bsml att gar. prch 
14 ac. Extras. $20 700 IV 1-2280. 



E. NORTIIPORT— Transferred Assume 

4V CI mtgp Cape Cod 7 rms 2 
complete Mhs glassed-in tubs Mndn 
kitchen din rm llv rm i»l*h mah-ranv 
paneling, mural paper, built-in cabinets, 
fireplace, .'slousfed breeieway att gar 
Alum storms screens Full bsmt built- 
in storage space 20x15 patio Fenced 
In area, acre FHa value S21 000 

Owner celling at 321000 Principals 

only FOrest 8-0T«2 

l. NORTMPORt-«-rm Cape. 4 acre. 

IS baths ear. full bsmt air-condl- 
tloner decorator shades patio walk 
to RR. schools, churches. Asking 
518.500. FO e-1853 



LAST NORWIC North shon 

SENSATIONAL BUY 

for person with discriminating laste 
^<>ntrmpornry All Brick Spill Level 
5 bedrms 3 baths. Thermostatically air- 
conditioned thruout. 2 zone heating 
system. Fully paneled den. Brick fl 
place 8 It wet bar. All utilities, fully 
varprted. Immediate occupancy. Prln 
Ctpals Only WA 2-4165. 



Homes— Norih Dakota 



I. Ill I M Solid brlek nncR. $C3.»w«. 
3 bdrms. full bsml. gar. attic fan. 
tlasler. storms A sc reens. LO 1-7676 
ill I M 7 m J hedraa all brick 
ranch, fin bsml 2 bths. plenty ex- 
rai 123990 FL 2-4576. 



CREENfi Colonial. 7 mi $21 M* 3 
Lrdrms den full basmt. many extras 

inclu ded F L 2 8903 

, \KMIM.IHLI .pill brick, rrdir like 
new. Sec lo appreciate. 3 bdrm. IS 
" full bsmt. extras $19 990. Pvt. 



FARMINGDALE. BRICK SPLIT 



MIlMlM.IMII Lge split. 3 bedrms. 

2 baths, rec rm shaded >ot 1.1.500. 
Pr.ncipals only CHapel 9-165 1. _ 
FARMINGDALE 7 yr brlek. ranch. C 

rm 3 bdrm. fin bsmt. car. 2 patios. 
extras, cd loc 318 OOP CHapel 9-1917. 
GREENE PARK »I8.»» 

ENGLISH TUDOR 

BRICK -SLATE-STUCCO 
$ big bedrms (4 on one fir 1 room for 
total of 7 bedrms Magnificent Archi- 
tecture A construction. 28 fl Hvgrm. 
fleldstone fireplace banquet dlngrm 
lge modern eai-m kitchen den on 1st 
fir, fin basemen! 2 baths 2-car 
garage. Close to all conveniences. 
Fleldstone 3-1100 

251-10 I ILLS1DE AVE 

CRI l>E PARK-3 bdrms. 9 yrs. over- 
sue gar. 



FRANKLIN SQUARE 

Spacious 6 rm Morton House In Pool 



Landscaped 
rage, many extras; 

4': GI mortg 
0084. 



rsUed lot. 

Immed occupancy 
Principals only. ItU V 



Homes— South Dakota 



FRANILLIN .Morion Ranch. 7 

rms. den. 2 bths. carace pool area. 
extras. Immediate occupancy. $21,500 
0*ncr IV 9-4108. 



FRANKLIN large Morton ranch. 7 
rms center hall 2 baths, patio, ga- 
rage Askme Qfl 000 IV r>-7668. 

FRANKLIN Ice Ran<h. t.mv 

enter hall. 2 bths. patio tar finished 

bsmt. extras. Ask $?6 000 IV 6 76C8 



FRIEPOBT. Exclsslse N/W $29,900 

Slate Roof-Brick Colonial 

4 Bedrooms- 2'/2 Baths 

Club-Like Finished Basement 

THRU hall to exceptionally larce eat- 
In kitchen. Log-burning fireplace In 
spacious living room. Real family size 
dining room opening onto rear screened 
terrace overlooking wide open parklike 
treed grounds. Come See The Rest At 
Your Service Every Day of the Week 

ALSO— VACANT 4 bedroom Ranch. 2 
baths. ♦ >i^ 'id Completely icdesorated 
Move In At Once— $27,000. 

-HOMES OF DISTINCTION" 

29 W Sunri se Hway . F R 9-3203 

FRLLPORT. Immaealale custom bulll 

split level. Situated In one of Free 
port's prime residential sections. Cenle 
hall. 3 master bedrooms plus maid' 
room 25 ft den formal dining room 
large eat In kitchen i*-j baths, full 
basement, oversized garaue. all appll 
ances Included. Must be seen lo be ap 
predated Asking $22 990 

Exclusive with DOW REALTY 
10 9 W. Sunrise Hway Freep ort. FR 8-5685 
FREEPORT. Beautiful custom Georgian 

type home center hall 4 bedrms 3 full 
baths den fin basmnt. Plenty closets 
Large porch, patio. Attached 2 car ga- 
rage AH rooms king size. Home in 
superb condition. Must be seen to be 
appreciated. Suitable for professional 

or executive. FR 9-2660^ 

FREEPORT— Beautifully decorated A 

landscaped 7 rm custom bit Ranch, 
plaster walls, superior const 4 lge 
bedrms, 3 full bths. all appliances. 
porch, bsmt attic, sewers. $29,990— 

private FR 8-0383 

FREEPORT N/W. $33,99* 

New gorceous 4 bdrm Colonial Ir 
choice loca Dlr: Sunrise Hwy to Brook 
side av north >-. ml to California av 
east 1 blk to model Greenbrier Homes 



FREEPORT S W-Fleldstone & brlc* 

Col. lge llvincrm frpl 'e n . dlnlngrm 

bths. 2-car gar. beat Lndscpd. $22,500 

RADTKE 

249 W Sunrise Hw y FR 8-6066 

FREEPORT Waterfront. 4 yr. 3 bdrm 

2 bths 20x20 llvrm 15x25 playrm 

carpet, sundeck. patlo-dock. extras 

CI 4V? $23 990 FR 9-1128. 



FRPT NW. $:9.909 col. side Ihm hall 
7 rm. 3 bdrm. 24 bth den. fin 
bsmt. scrnd oorch. att gar. Agt BA 
3-«40. 



Homes— Utah 



EAST ^ vi ■ LAKE sacrifice-- 

SI-LIT LEVEL on 80x100— Three bed- 
rooms and IS baths. 22 foot recreation 
room— Eat In Kitchen. Take over 4V»'. 
3. I. Morlcage— No comm. 
Closing Cosls— ASKING $H 500. Prin- 
cipals only— CALL ALL DAY SUNDAY 
OR AFTER ~ P. M. ALL WEEK. Al 
$-9906. 



LAST MEADOW $19,999 

ALL-BRICK RANCH 
'/ 4 Acre — 2-car Gar - 2 Bths 

THE BUY OF A LIFETIME I NO exac- 

teratlon-a 10-yr-old All-Brick Ranch 
w«rth many thousands more! On It-acre 
nursery grounds, features 6 UMHlnOtti 
rms. incl targe din rm eat-In kitchen 
25' llv rtn 3 twin- sired bedrms 2 
full bath* Custom features Incl plaster 



I \M Ml Mi"W I'HOri R-LOM TAX 

H'LL SESSION SCHOOL AREA 
See the NEW 1961 

Colonial & Hi Ranch 

4 bedrm 3 bathi 2-car carafe A 

(eaturn 

, A.MIC KITCHEN 



• I ' 



PTM 



$22,990 to $24,990 

Meadow Pkway to Hemps! Tpke. 

right least i 1 mile to Bellmore Rd 
Right (Sot 8 oiks to model PE 1-9606 



EAST MEADOW. ImmaevUU 7 rm 
Lakeville split level on A5il55 profes- 
sionally landscaped plot offers 3 larce 
bedrms full dlnlne rm, large living rm 
with turpi 2 full baths full bimi + 
playrm fully air cond throughout, gar. 
screened patto. extras galore. Top Lo- 
cation. $27500. 

1W3 Hcmp tl T.>ke East Meadow 



E PATCHOG (South Country Shores) 

Ranch— 5 lge rms. fireplace, bsml 

playroom, garage 1/3 acre. $17,500 

j 

> \1 I I \KE $26,000 

5 YEAR OLD TWO FAMILY 

, over 6 rms Deep plot, carace. m, 
llocks lo public A Parochial schU A 
(K station 

TRI TOWN AGENCY 
a E Rocka*ay RR sta Ly 9-3324 



FREEPORT N W Steams Park. (Bald. 

win schools) Georclan brick. 4 mastei 

bedrms 3 baths maid's room A bath 

$47,500. Owner FR 8-7479 or FR 8-76S5 

FREEPORT Beaut S rm split, fin porch 

A basement W W car„*i New alum 

ns. Sacrifice at $20,990. MA 3-0154. 

IRIS PORT on Randall's Bay— modern 

nch owned by builder, beautifully 

located, full bulkheadlng A boat slip, 

Ideal fur boat lover swimming In bay, 

100 ft terrace along waterfront 3 bed- 

~" huge living and dining room plu* 

i arge den overlooking garden. ', 

fireplaces. Ideally laid out kitchen 

dinette and laundry room, fully equipped 

7 full bath.ooms. 2 car garage wltfc 

ee st 'race space, and additional bath- 

im for summer use. Very low taxes. 

Prhed at $52 500 for quick sale. Phone 

appointment FR 9-1885 



-ball! 
llv a yrs. Fleldstone . 
hmgle 6 A 6 rms, 4V* CI 
plot 85x85 LY 9-7688 



Cfstl 



cAST WILLISTON 

FULLY AIR-CONDITIONED 
4 BEDROOM HOME 
fitting high above this lovely village 
with a gorgeous view A attractive 
surroundings this bOJM offers the 
ultimate in modern comf'Tt. 2S baths, 
fireplaces) living m. larce kitchen. 
Tamily rm. 2 car garage. On over 1/3 
acre $36,800 

LOOKING FOR IMPROVEMENT'* 

A family wiiii imagination and a Utile 
creative spirit will love this home and 
can turn a small investment Into a 
valuable atsel It Is well-built, has a 
modern heatlnc syucm, and many un- 
usual features such as Hs basement 
den with wondbuming fireplace. 3 bed- 
rms. IV) baths full dining rm fire- 
placed living rm. U acre. Well worth 
\ look . 

LOW-LOW .. $22 500 

86 IIILLMD- AV Wllllston PU PI 7-7600 

146 Mineola Blvd. MincoL. PI 6-7200 

PI 6-7436 

I WITH DECCA MA 1-630- 



Homes— Arizona 



EAST VHll.lNTON-.Splil Level. 4 bed 
rms. 2 baths. 2 car gar. recreatlu 
m Pfinr only $30 000 PI 2-4935 

E~ ttlLLI*>TON Mineola. Weitbar 
New ranches, capes A colonials frot. 

$19,500. Chllds-Kramer. PI 6-3075. 



FREEPORT N/W $29,900 

4 Bdrms 2 1 /* Bths 

Living rm with flrcpl. full din 
nice kltch screen terr, attached gai 
top location. You pay taxes on 
•PRESELECTED HOMES" 
48 So Bergen PI FReeporl 8-8050 



OARDFN $85,000 

CUSTOM BUILT HOME-PRIVACY 

BORDERING COLF COURSE 

tonally landscaped acre 
completely fenced In. complete privac; 
Underground sprinkler system Close I 
finest shopping center of NYC leading 
branch stores Wood frame A ccdai 
exterior arilsttcally built 5 yrs old 
Pnld llv rm w fpl also Ikc formal Ih 
rm. Sun porch Pwdr rm Formal dlr 
rm Motern up-to-date electric kltch A 
bkfit area M-tr t<drm tiled bath 
2nd fl: 2 bedrms bath Driveway gale 
electrically controlled talso doors of 2- 
Car can. Ask lot Brcchurr 1239 
AMERICAN LISTINGS. INC. 

22, MU 6-3824 
llubbcll A .Clapper. Rllrs. PI 7-2900 



GARDEN ASKING $15,000 

A Taylor Warner Exclusive 

usl listed. This beautiful white brk 
.olonlal home with slate roof in deslr- 
<ble Mott sect, spacious living rm with 
frplce full dining rm. Irg mod ktchn 
'ith breakfast bay. pwdr rm. circuit 
.laircase. up lo 3 lge bdrms A bth 
Truly an exquisite home, ovcrslied ga 
jn extra Irg pit. 

MAY ONLY BE SEEN WITH 
TAYLOR WARNER 

We are not affiliated with any other 
Office, See our many exclusive listings 
■ 01-7th Str eet Esl 1919 PI 2-710 

GARDEN 

This distinctive home Is nicely placed 
on very large plot. Bulll to exacting 
ttandards of owner who Is In the busi- 
ness. Narrow clapboards, pine wi 



Homes— Minnesota 



'•^"l »•! ' M» COLONIALS 

SEE WHAT WE OFFER 
IN LARGE NEW HOMES 
FOR THOUSANDS LESS 
Center hall, llv rm. fireplc. book- 
cases full din rm kltch break- 
fast rm. den, laundry space pallo. 

8 rms. 2V) baths $31 750 

9 rms 2<i baths $3 .500 

RALPH RlCCARDO CORP 

Inspect mooel at 162 willow St 
Weekdays PR 5-3400 Sun PI 1-6911 



2-story. 4 bdrm, center foje 






$45 000 

224 Kensington Kd Pit 00x100 $43 iOO 
17k Oxford Blvd. large plot $57 500 
NW Cor Sackville-Stwart 50x110 $54,500 

OTHER PLOTS AVAILABLE 
Will Build to suit Pn m $J1 250 

F & G CONSTRUCTION CO 

PI 6-5127 



Colonial One 
tures— large llvn 
dining rm. eat 
bath. 3 bedrm 
garage. $42,500, 



GARDEN CITY 

f Its kind lsl fir fea- 



2 oaths 2d; 



!• \k. ii \ -i 

6 BEDROOMS. 4 BATHS 
Large colonial in Estates section. 1st 
fir includes sunpoi. h. den. Dowder rm. 
3 fireplaces A tooted terrace. 2 car 
garage Asking $49,950 

■ Garden City's Oldest Realtors" 
Hilton Av S, 7th St. PI 7-2900 

(Diagonally opposite Gard City Hotel! 



DVK4II \ M.l 

SPLIT-LEVELS 

We have several spills, all with 3 bed- 
rms A 2 baths, priced from $29,500 
10 $32,500 Call us and well be happy 
to show them to you. 



|p \K< • l \ Ipi UP.,1 
MCCLELLAND HOUSE OF THE WEEK 

Small country estate In heart of this 
beautiful nil over S acre of secluded 
property 7 bedrms. 3^ bths- wonder- 
ful r>.>mr for lge fam. nr sta $47,500 
■SEE OUR PHOTO PILES" 

73 Nassau Blvd PI 2-8888 

Garden City Asking $42,500 

STRATFORD SCHOOL 
Ranch cape. 120x110. 4 bedrms. 2 bth. 
livinc rm w-fpic, dinlnf r ~ 



storage. Bsmt playn 
736 Tranklln Ave co 



and 



GARDEN CITY 

Colonial ranch, |rg landscaped pit. 7 
car att gar. livinc rm. fireplace, din- 
ing rm. den. master bedrm A bath 1st 
3 bdrms. bth 2nd terr. awn $43 500. 
Nassau Blvd Station PI 6-7077 

i Same Loc ation For_35 Yearn 

JAkOTV-IMIlH.FSpaelous Col. brek A 

clapboard Irg living rm. flrcpl. 
full slie dining rm. kitchen, den. p 
rm. 3 bdrms A bth on 2nd. lalnusicd 
terrace, oversized gar $32,950. 



1) \k<» I \ IMHII.k $49,000 

6 bedrm 4V* bth English Tudor. Exclus 
loc on Irg plot, format din rm A all 
necessities for gracious living. 
Bordtnl Real Estate iv 3-2500 

541 Hempstead Tpke. West Hempstead 



Homes — Colorado 



HUERFANO CITT _ $MS## 

4 BR 2 BATHS— Playroom 

Patio - MANY EXTRAS 
Owner Pi 6-8529 



IK MM \mi brlek Cape Cod ex. 

panslon attic 2 years old. fp'tptace, 

slum scrns. strms, Prncols PI 1-8450 



DVERFAHO Cap* Cod 67x10* 4 Irg 

bdrms. 2 bths. eat-In kitchen many 
sitras4Vfc out asklns $32,500 PI 2-1591 



flL'ERFAM) CITY— 4 BIG BEDROOM 
Cape Ranch— Big House- 
Big Plot-$32.000. PI 7-5292. 



IILEKFAXI 119 STRATFORD AVE 

CORNER OF OXFORD BLVD 
Beautlfu slate roof Colonial completely 
modernized. Plot 120x150. 4 bedrm 
bths, 2d fir. 2 bdrms. l bth 3d fir. 



itcdci 



Uvlg 



j.ijj. 



m it- 



Hi IKI VNO SOCTH $14,500 

Hancn. less than 2 yrs old. 3 bd 
mdn kltth. full basmt. garage. 
Bordlnl Real Estate IV 3-2500 

54x Hempstead Tpke. West Hempstead 



HUERFANO 

Gurgling Brook.. 
Redwood Contemporary . . . 

Over an acre— with a brook runnlr 
to a nearby pond— proper features for 
modernistic ranch! Cathedral celllnged 
fireplace living room— paneled: gli 
wall dining wine opening onto pat 
Paneled den 19x20! Open celling kitchen 
with breakfast balcony! Three cnambers 
two swank tiled baths Double garage 
Phone }ax throughout. Excellent condi- 
tion. 



AT $31,500 



EUREKA! 



SHOWN BY MARY FORD 
GENERAL EASTERN CO. 

Northern Blvc at Clen Cove Road 
Greens-ale, N. Y MAyfalr l-52i0 



REMON I MORGAN ISLAND 

aterview Split, wonderfully land- 
aped >* acre, cathedral living rm 4 



Homes— New Mexico 



landscaped lei 
solid cherry 
shuttered livl 
7_bedrms._3Vi 
BERN M III 
$29,000 A: ' 



1 acre, beautiful trees. 
race, new custom kitchen. 

paneled library, large 
ic rm. basement playroom 

baths. $35,000 OR 6-2118 



i>fru\ 



bdn 



playrrr 
lovely old tr 
to be a pprt 

BERNAI ILLO 



ated OR 6-1387 



pel 



, Custom bit ranrh, 
baths, closed porch 
:ri-s btaut indscpd. 
pvt 



;4:..000 OR 1-3706 



ii iin M ILLO 1/1 acre. 7 rooms. 3 bed- 
rms. 2 baths. 54 yr old split, fire 
place. 2 car garage den. beach. N< 
schools A churches. All appliances, c 
pet Prlnc only. i'J9 soo or B-3106 



iiiiin M ll I OEatsle 

on 13 ac wooded plot. 4 bedrms mod 
ktch. IK, baths, den. nr schls. $23,000. 

SILAS GOLDBERG A SON. INC. 
25 Clen SI OR 6-2700 



Homes—Wisconsin 



bat, 4 bedrmi 



GU v in SU Mast i 

2 baths. Choice area 01 
123.800 Ranger Realty. OR 6-9000 



QLCM III AD. 9 >r rent hall ranrh. J 
" Jrcas. 2 blhs. dry bamnt porches, 
patio $2 9.500 lo w tax OR 6 5173 



GLEN IIP Sturdy. J-t 
Exclnl. gar. [rult tr. 
Ursula Johnstone 



Irm, kraall Col 
N A-* $19,000 
OR I ISM »' 10 



GUN III AD Just Move In $37,900 

LUXURY 4 BDRM. 2 BTH RANCH 
J J Putty. Inc OR f.-.»M» 



Great Neck-Kings Point Rnch 



bulld4 rs. 
Carrier. 

gnifx 
Ished bi 
>nd 



built by 
illy alr-condltloned by 
largi 



fo 



nt wit 



:22' paneled del 



irMU 



rge extri 
si 



HO 



beautiful full acre loaded with trees 
20x66' reinforced concrete patio witti 
barbecue Private road adjacent t> 
school. Pool area and drxk privileges 

i 'OP HU 7-2134. 
I in MPI \t I VI » l-« SK.sa* 

MACNIF CUSTOM BRK STONE 

SLATE OF 4 BDRM. 2S BTH DEN 
TOP POOL, DOCK AREA. PRICED 
FOR QUICK SALE 
lit OFFERING EXCPTNL $26 90C 

YOUNC BRK 3HNCL U ACRE LAND- 
SCPD CRNDS 4 BDRM 2 BTHS 
MANY EXTRAS. MOVE RIGHT t> 
CONDITION' 

CUTTER MAN 
544 Middle Neck Rd HU 7-1171 



T REM PEA I I U $37,100 

BRAND NEW 
LISTING 

5 BEDRMS 2 BATHS SMALL DEN 
LARGE PANELED LIVING RM DINING 
RM AREA WITH FIREPLACE ULTRA 
MODERN KITCHEN WALK TO 

SCHOOL HOUSES OF WORSHIP 
SHOPS TRANSPORTATION 

VVM ERSKINE HU 2-7460 

I lit MI'i 



\l *4<'R|FI(-E-$23.N 



IK UN Mil It' Famed ■Rosbur,-' area, 
4 bedrms. s| acre mne. tall trees, gar. 
frpl. low cash, only $22,500. 
RANGER Rlty 77 School SI. OR 6-9000 



III UN AIM I <> Rambling Homestead m 

acre, tsll trees, fpl In llv rm. 4 oi 

3 baths, new kit. 2 car Rrd $3fi koo 

C^F"AL EASTERN CO MA l-526tt 

HEK>AI II.I.O 5 rm bungalow en hill, 

y landscaped and fenced, near prl- 

■each $11.000 OR 6-90^9 3-7 P.M 



BRICK & STONE RANCH 



w fireplace dining rm 
2 bedrms ceramic bath 
rea for additional 2 rms 
ar terraced grnds e^lOO 

Associates. BA 9-8966 



Homes— lllinoi 



i.KI I MsVt N AU Wli 
home 1 yr ne» 6 rm' 
tub bsml. scrns. storm 
arpetinc iras heat s 
wing trarufa Aski; J 31 -J» 
.nly Weekdays EV c" 
XJrest 8-4852 
HI Mil It BAYS lUnth I/f 



Hempsteo West 



b locatkn Trrmend' 
lor home on prefesj 
130x130 plot OH (iarO 



aklast 



price. 

S refHi 






rd .un pel 
car. Loaau 
Exclusive Eldorado PI 7-J7 
IlkMiFRMiN (narT 

plaster walls, ail rl_. . 
•ven, oil HW heat. OUOaV 
A doors On>aoi'»tm partial' 
basement, fenced yard. It 

19 9«) after 5 PM Moo-Ft 
>at. Sunday. IV 6-6748. 



HEMPSTEAl 



■A" resldenti 
liv.nc rm dining i 
bedrms down: 3 bedrms «H 
basemt. IS baths, oil hsssssVf 

0x100. low taxes IV 1-|' 
patio double garage, bm 
frinclpals $33 990 



Homes— low 



I'li.ltt.E NH « $24.99f 

NEW COLONIAL 

Custom built home on tree- lined street 
at City line Subway-bus Quick occu- 
pancy. 6 rooms, Hollywood kitchen iw 
baths garage. 28 NASSAU RD 

t*i block Northern Blvd> Inspect 10-5 
PIERCE NECK. POOL AREA. Enelhl 
Tudor; magnificent gardens for com 



ptet 



ptie 



■ 1,.1-r 



3i*. bths mahoi; library oak den 
larirc modern kitchen, paneled rec m 
w fireplc A bar Low 50 s HU 7-?22? 



Homes — Nebraska 



Mil. Poal area? Distinctive 2.tlar 

Encllsh res. Perfect cond Slate roof 
all rms kin.: size Den. new kltch. r-d 
rm on IM fl. 4 bdrms 21, bths on 2nd 
125 ft Plot Low taxes' 4S". mine 
Asking $29 500 Simon HU 2-7575 



gar Priced for quick sale $21,750. 

FRANK M MCCURDY CO INC 
154 Montague St TR 5-2 266 



UK II UUIM 


N Colonial center hall S 


large rooms 


IH baths modern kltch 


en. garage s< 


reened porch corner plot 


low taxes A 


kc low 30'^ \tV 2-31H 



lmni.it 2 stOD 



i;m II \lllh(i\.l MVFRSITV GRDNS 
Beautiful English Tudor home on 80x120 
plot Must be jeen to be appreciated 
$47,500 Phone HU 7-1059. 



RICHARDSON Co 

spacious. 3 bedrooms, 
2 baths, glass porch. 
HU 7-8114. 



bulll (S years) 
ie down 
$31,900 



KM IIAHDMIN Designer"* home Lr 

conlemp ranch Ctr hall 5 bdrms, 

3^ bths huge den pan. bsml . poo] 

q«k camp tennis In 50's HU 2-W6? 

QT. NK. Thomastan. Male' "offer Own- 

er HU 2-7845 Engl Tudor A-l end 

Lo tax Pool Mny sirs. 21 Terrace Cp 

RICHARDSON KINGS POINT 

Ranch 3 bdrm. 2 bths. many extras 

Ideal acreage $47. OOP HU 7-5072 



GT NK. Lake Ranrh. 3 bedrms, 

2 baths. 18x24 den alr-condltloned 

2-car $49 900 Owners Act, IN 1-6860 



Kit MVllDMPN -AAA location Builders 
pkee 5 bedrms. 3 baths, pool. $56,500. 

MU 7-2591. 



lil'lUI \ Klncs Poll.:. Bob Rawe 

Ranch, pool dock fullv air cond 
spklrd. $58,500. HU 2-3238. owner. 



UKHWII^ON KINGS POIIv 

ONLY TEN GRAND CASH 

and you have hit the Jackpot of the 
Season* Owner will take second mort- 
gage from any sound buyer 1 . His over- 
an-acre estate Is gorgeously landscaped 
His slate-roofed Colonial Is simply 
charming —center hall, bay- windowed 
fireplace living room, powder room, 
square dining room, class block den 
with fireplace. flag»lone terrace, stain- 
less sleel kitchen l»a]| oven, dish- 
washer et al) Breakfast room. Four 
family chambers two tlted baths 
Maid's room, third bath. Three car 
attached garage. The grand style ol 
living— on low cash down! 
Never before advertised ..... $64,500! 



Bxd 



Shown by 



GENERAL EASTERN CO. 



510 . 



Blvd, Lake Su< 



HU 2-8772 



MU I \\( I MING POINT 
ONE OF THE WORLDS BEAUTIFUL 
HOMES ON A DREAM WATERFRONT 
SETTING. TWO STORY PRESTIGE 
CONTEMPORARY OF THE FINEST 
MATERIALS A CONSTRUCTION. IN- 
CLUDING STONE MARBLE. GLASS 
A PEGGED WOOD 3 HUGE FAMILY 
BEDRMS PLUS MASTER SUITE, 
MAID'S SUITE AND TREMENDOUS 
DEN GORGEOUS WHITE SAND 

BEACH AND NEW YORK SKY LINE 
VIEW THIS IS THE EPITOME OF 
BEAUTY A LUXURY. OFFfRED AT 
$175,000 AND BY APPOINTMENT 
ONLY 

WE ALSO HAVE ESTATES AVAIL- 
ABLE IN THIS AND OTHER AREAS 



GREAT NECI $37,500 

Center hall, spotless brick Colonial 
slate roof. In addition to the usua 
there are 4 bdrms. 3S Hollywood baths 
huge screened porch One ot our moll 
beautiful "Tree-lined Streets" close U 



m-.i 



it;...i 



FREE POOL & PARK. $49,500 



* Center 
nlrally air 

im fUgsi 



Homes— Texas 



HI VI -mum Poo I 'Dock Area 

5-yr-ola cornri. 1 tarn duplex seml-det 
6 rms. FULL BASE, gas heat, storm 
A screen windows A doors. Venetian 
blinds, washing mach rrfric added 
rear porch with aluminum awning A 
garden tool house, beaut shrubbery 
NEW AREA, 2 blks from school, shop- 
P! n *.-_* tIABA, aWaWlni mtge approx 



RUSSELL GARDENS Both young, spa- 
clous Colonials wfih 4 bedrms. den, 
many luxurious extras. High $40 s. 

123 Middle Neck Rd. HU 2-8220 



'»»• smith 



m Mil i wisr 

Brk.. slate rf . Col . 
frpl . kc din rm . 
eat-ln kltch . scrn pa 
bdrms.. pine bsml. *, 
IV^ 6-4260. 

III MHO I in w Caataea *. 

6 yrs. t rms, 3 ordreaa. 
sired kitchen, walk-In ctoaeti 
cond. sprinkler system lire 
tern. 2-car garage, walk 
shop ping, transprtn $3 
lit MOOI III VW.i-B.7u* 

bdrm. 2 bath Flrrpl in « 
den. porch, pool area al 
Garage Extras $27 000 rf 



III MIHH.IM- W. Cwwu_ 
4 bedrm Cape. 2 up H 
fin. bsmt. frpl. bar. p 
schools, extra s IV 3-1 

IM M1HH III CisUa 1 rr t 



. 1 1 ■ i 



III Mil' >1 I" I W. legal r-ta 
In,- cordltlon 4A3 lar 

■ ms rent free 42 000 IV 

lirMBtUDT ni.aae^u 
tree shaded plot, b rea. j 

I-car garage. Vigilant IV ■ 



lit MIMILDT W. 1.1X1 
Large wooded plot. 
Schools, shopping . $37J 
HEM PS HI RC WIST. 8 yr 
rms 13 acre. gar. petto. 
■ Idow must sell Cl.talai 



Homes — Kam 



HEMP VA-Cape tod 7 n 

Nr schls A shopg 17x10 

118 750 _•■ -.'l ■ •!:•• iv l t 

M vit^H VI L i, acre ♦. 

baths 3-car gar. Choice V 

taxes $27 ,500. J M S* 



MARsHAI | HARBOR 

FIRST OFFERl 

A first class unerowttei 
pool park A boa ling area 
schools; beautiful taadat 
view overlooking bay. 

HERE IT IS 
outstanding 10 rm ranch. 
lge llv rm w.'marble fin 
m. paneled den nlayn 
ten. lge screened le 
grill: overslted garage; 1 1 
nance. $59,500 HU 7-24111 



M s,K>ll lit. 

BUY OF THE Yl[ 

'HARMING 3 BEDROOM! 

'AR GARAGE. FIREPUf 

SCREENED PATIO. 

^'ERYTHING 

n. hard |. block. I 
nation Plata, h ewiett 

HEWLE PAR' 

"f luxurious home on 1 13 i 
■ od- Ideal for mother A t 
loctors h ome A off exel » | 
MAR>HAtX EAST I 

'S Jear Colonial front ap I 
7S baths den + flats 1 
rly Park school 



r.£ + ! 



Ilfj 



II VI N-l E SCHOOL 

Custom bulll 
l baths, chi 
'onvenlent itat, shi 
"atras. $29 000 FR 



*' sj' 



I I in hi m ni \in 
able 4 bdrm. 2S batb 1 _ 
>ificently landscaped 1/31 
nurse area. Anita P. af 
'■■R 4-4204 



Homes— Oklai 



IIHI.FTT. Beaallfal I _ 
onlal 4 bedrms 3 baths | 
iff East Rockawav T" 
'nlon Ave TW 1-] 



I. II VDi -(.K VN-CXILO $_ 
-'ape Cod Beauty— Lg. II 
Oln. Rm -Fam Kit —4 aV| 
-Playrm. with bar. 
.cre-Walk lo T " 
YOUNGS AND 

35 East Main 
1 911 N Y Ave 
(.It VDi (.RANT l.xeewtl 

Professional spot w/cs| 
->here ad] village. $2tJN| 
Beautiful home Avail nor 



III NTINGTON-Wlr 
■IACNIF WATERFR 
Spacious thruoul. 
*p maid's quarters, 
>cach A mooring 

HARVEY OP 1 
■f Glynn « " 



GRADY-CRANT 

Planning lar_ 

MOVE UP— NOT OUT--. 
>ee this 3 bdrm cxparseAtl 
J. J. REALTY 

IA 3-. -.-Q1 

I. It \l»i -t".lt VN I -LLOT 
/-yr custom ran, • 
lew farm ranch 2H acl 
irick Col 5-ac estate. 
>AKWOOD REALTY 
3A A Coosehlll Rd. 



(.RAU1-(.HaS| Crxb 



ptll 



•IB 



l.lltliM.IUM VUlagJ 
house 3B. finished all 
:ltch. dinette 2 bath I 
•layrm low lai 
21 "OP HAmllton 
CRADY-GR INT 



tan 



oon 



s— Michigan 



HARBOR. Complete prl- 

1 end rd. Wooded-2 ac 
j 7 rm custom Ranch 
ths. 2 trpls. Irc flagstone 
iter circular drv. beach 
HAmlllon 1-0572 



1 ACRE TREES 

home. 8 charming rm* 
: baths. 2-car garage 
extras. $33,700. 
i 1150 E Jerlchr 

300 PIONEER 7-245T 



Dlmvn 



Rd. Ow 



,500— A R 1-0 246 

Wooded acre o'sitcd 

ted playroom. patio 
double parage, storms' 
tens. 2 baths. HAmllton 

HARBOR. Nrw Countr> 
Top or Beech Hill Rd 
4 BATHS 24 ACRES 

HAMILTON 3-9017 

-Ideal for Grn'l prac 
Expandable ranch, bn 

acre cor., best offer 



custom nultt $24,900 
rpl. sep din rm. scrcene 
:ar. frees, 4 acre zon* 
fU 3-4988. 



Dli Hill* 2-story Col 

baths. ' acre. $28.50t 

8 of HA 7-6 51 5 aft 6 PM 

HOLLY HILLS 



1-0069 af 7 pm 
ll-room hom< 
■; $?8 000 OF 



OBEENLAWN All-crdar 
tis. playrm flrepl. w w. 
rash. $18,990. AN 1-0524. 
JnaTHirihw.-Kl ranch. 7 



■■ t r.i ■: including storagi 
in. alr-condltioner. car 

I mortgage $33,500. 

iVE_ 8-9775 

rm Ranch. 3 bedrms, 
mris. paneled den al 
r compl with *57 Ford 

commuting'. High 4*1 
0. OV 1-2519, 



BARTHOLOMEW WEEQIAHIC PARK 

New Luxurious Atr-Cond Bldg 
Jtcellent commutation & Shopping 
Agent always on prera. WAverly 3-6859 



s— Missouri 



hwood Park Easl, split. 
paneled den & dinette 

» OV 1-3137 

mil. 1 rooms oversiied 
Pkway shopping, schls. 
ras. $23.890 WE 1-90QB 

\ HILLS. NR MAIN ST 

TTVE- DESIRABLE 

IPT $127 LG DINETTE 

7-44 70 Av. BO 8-2620. 



i HILLS, modern 4 rm 

eeorated. main floor of 
xcel location. $125 Call 
MR. 



i HILLS. 147-4* 70 Rd. 
newly decor. 2 fam cor 
iihwr nr transit 4 shop 



lOTOC -Sacr $Z9.S«. 
|r garage. 22x50 pool. H 
treets, beautifully land- 
' s 7935 

ICE COLONIAL 

iJded plot. 2 patios, ele- 



K !pt« 



All 



FLOiD-FOlNTAINw*k«vl Golf View 

COUNTRY CLUB APTS 
1255 NORTH AVE. 
One of Westchester s most lux- 
urious & Modern Bides Large 
Terraces Gale House Immediately 
Adjacent Schonls Shopping Bus 
Wt j 5U ROOM APTS 

if Supt Prem NE_3-943: 

BARTHOLOMFl! 167 O-nlre Ave 

MODERN ELEVATOR BUILDING 

34 $123 44 $16C 

See superintendent basement 

N H-. Iill 

BEACH PRIVILEGES 

2H 4 3i j rm a pt. NE 6-3 370 

BARTHOLOMEU -Davenport Neck, Irg 
3 bedrm apt $176 short sublease 

optlona' renewal. NE 6-0742 

BARTHOLOMEW-LOVELY 44 RMS 
View of Sound. Nr schools & beach 
$152 BE 5-2364 



t< bedrms. 34 btl 
*m'i, brkfst, den. Dar. 
. 3 w/b frplc. ultra mod 
,-ery conceivable luxury. 
jtf gar. Low taxes. Quiet 
«Valk to schools, shops. 
1 FR 1-2210. 



-Arkansas 



I *• - <. m.,j S41.S00 

rd Ave. turn 1 block 
tfeft to model . CE 9-9184 
SlTENDEN '51 RANCH 

*I»D SHOPPING AREA 
..are kitchen, garage 

© TO $14,890 
ft-T-l-O-N 

WTpke PE 5-1400 



JVITTOWN 

OS'NG FEES 



•fneh, Weslbsry 4 bd- 

ilfaths. dormer, paneled 
»■ vestibule, oversized 
'■■: patio, beaut land- 
i-Jiik to swimming pool. 
>n< $17,990. ED 4-5356. 



Nil EGA Ranch (not 

> Ige bdrms. 2 bths. |ge 
He oversize gar. all ap- 
|k dishwasher, conven- 
itf excel Ige lam. $16,990 



ETJ.990 2 brdrms. To 
,b* comer plot In desir- 
n ( Hicksville. Onlv $990 
|U(iPd buyer. Corrlston 
Hj 'Sid Tpke. PE 5-6120 . 
L\ nivdrd Ranch. Over. 

y™. 2 bths, panld din 
layrm. Extras incl TV. 
».|:omb scrns. $16,990. 



ivale beach, all brick 

I rms+2 baths+5 rms 
'use with 20* terrace 
80x120 2-car gar 



131.000 

ie 80x67 

Dm realty 

ITLv 



bsmt 
GE 1-1730 



■ U Stone & Brick. 8 , m . 
Hba, large living & dtn- 
lle eplace. sundeck extra 
H 2 car finished ga- 
i.ic Tree lined qulel 
ni professionally land- 
»•*, Private Beach rights 
principals only-$39,500. 



)anish Ranch 

4 br. 2 bths + 2 
Jar. 80x65. Trans. 
CE 1-7221. 



'rgeoBs ] bedn 



ie -Louisiana 



nusual features. 
3kr G E Z-711T 
fr leaving (own 

to rent 7 rm. 

landscaped In 

slble to nearby 

Mil from tnld- 



Olen Cove Area, 
j bdrms $18,000 
nn. gar.. $13,000 
"■ i-mem . $16,500 
3R 1JK82. 5772 
i"RI» MUST SELL 
ICED TO $28,500. 



2 bedrooms. % 
d den. finished 
^ach rights. 1/3 
6000 OR 6-2053. 



Mm 



Homes — Ohio 



MAM K. 905-907 PALMER AVE 

Matin if 34-rm gdn apt $130 

SUPi" OW PREM, OW 8-fil5ii 



UAMARONE 1 n 


is. new co-op 


$150.25 llicl G & E 


31.760 cash. 


immediate occupancy 




CALMER TERRACE 


OWens 8-230 



.MONTA COZY SEASIDE 

CO'lTAGES FOR SALE OR RENT 
I OTS. NEWMAN. OR 5-752L 



MONTCLAIR-S ROOSEVELT PLACt 

3*5 ROOMS (2 baths, terrl. fr $110 



SEE SUPT or 


call PI 6-1799 


vlT VERNO . Spa» 


Ish Duplex, bi-iime. 


living rm. flrep 


ace. dining rm. ! 


bdrms, klchn. cara 


gc. opp park; con* 


Jew Haven RR. 1 




;mall family MO 


■ *>3:u 



tfl* VERNO 

27 CLAREMONT AVE 
5 ROOMS 
Immediate occupancy, earage i 



MT VERNO 1 V2 ROOMS $82 



»ir. verno — m 



Office. 101 Ell wood Av, 



Mt Verno -3/2 Rooms, $115 



Homes — Indiana 



IIAHIHULOMEW Attractive J-rm apt 
2d fl. fine conv location, for quiet 
Fam avail Apr 1 $125 MO 4-6970. 



BARTHOLOMEW mod, rn 5-rm apt 
Top floor, elevator. Lovely view. Wall- 
o station. $155. MO 4-13H6. 



CARROLL 5 large i 

modern kitchen, bal 
garage: good reference; 



room, pantry 
MO 4-1867. 



BARTHOLOMEW ISs C'RARY AVE. 

4^ ROOMS. NEW BUILDING. 
CALL SUPT. MO 4-6787 



CARROLL Sub-lease spacious modern 
3V? Rm Apt. opp park: elev. alr-cond. 
Y bus at corner. $174 mo WA 3-37S3 



BARTHOLOMEU Pine Grove Manoi 

Garden cooperative apts Total In- 
vestments $400. 2-bedroom units $101.75 
3-bedroom units $122 10. CH 9-6450 



BARTHOLOMEU J4 rooms. 2 baths. 

garage enclosed porch private beach 

5185. NE 6-417 4: NE 2-2177. 

N " ROCHEL Glen Island Manor, 

n*. $125; 4"6 2 baths $150: edn apts 
600 Pelham Rd. Glen Is App. NE 3-6168 



TIPPECANOE 204 WOODCLIFF AVE 
NEW BLDG, FACES PK AIR-COND 
3V4 rms. parking. $145. Call wkdys 

4 PM-9 PM all day Sat-Sun UN 9-0979 



FLOYD-FOUNTAIN605 NEWKIRK AVE 

Modern Garden Apt Development 
4^, garden $111. 4Vj— $119. Immed 
Garages avail. Supt UNIon 6-2324 



FI.OYD-FOITNTAIM 301 79 St. 3 

modern apt, elev. park view. $100 i 
Leone UN 7-0061 or UN 9-0858. 



FLOYD-FOUNTAIN615 Hl'DSON BLVI> 

1 rm efficiency $H5: iVr-$ll5. Modern 
lev. Immed. Agent. UNIon 7-8383, 



FOUNTAIN QUALITY & ECONOMY! 

DELIGHTFUL SUBURBAN LIVING 

at LOW, LOW COST1 

NEW LUXURIOUS 

AIR-CONTJITIONED. ELEV APTS 

OVERLOOK TERRACE 

Falrvlew. Prospect & Maple Aves 

3, 3'/ 2 , 4, fh, 5 Rms, fr $130 

~REE GAS. FREE AlR-CONDITl^NlNG 
FREE ON SITE PARKING! 

IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 

Spacious, off- foyer apts 

Multitude of closets. 

Deluxe Kitchens: Built-in 

ranges & wall ovens 

Elegant Lobby 

Beautiful, unobstructed views 

Including L 1 Sound 

Near fine schools, excellent 

shon>* lovely beaches, boat's 

fishing major highways RR 

sta (3i alr-cond trains dallyi 



Homes — Tennessee 



LOADON 

749 Scotland Rd, Orange 

Luxury 4 to 5^ apts. 2 Baths deluxe 
appointed and Immediately available 

PRIVATE SWIMMING POOL 
Central air conditioning, elevators: 15 
cu ft refrigerators: GE dishwashers: 
electric ranges: wall ovens; private 

ices: parking 
Schools, churches, stores ail near-bv 
adjacent Mountain Railroad Station 
South Orange. NJ Call OR 4-802y. 



LEW IS-LOADON 5Vi Ige rms. new 2- 

fam $185 Business cpl, security, refs. 
5 min G W Bridge WI 7-4179 

LEV. IS. LOADON $^ i ee rms , new .. 

lam $185. Business cpl, security, refs. 
5 mln G W Bridge WI 7-4179 

LEWIS-LOADON Country Club Garden 

2-STORY LUXURY GARDEN BLDG 
Overlooking PelLam Country Club 

316 Rms w/Terrace, $137 
4'/2 Rms Terrace, fr $162 

NEAR ALL CONVENIENCES 
920-C Pelhamrtale Ave or PE 8-1907 



LEW IS-LOADON 2^ large i 

bide overlooking goll 



LEW IS-LOADON 4784 Boston P^sl Rd 

2V3V4'6 rms: excel layout; bcaui 
oc atlon-parklnt; facils. Supt PE 8-00 70 
LEWIS! 1? 5th Ave near station 

.Moo. eiev bldg 3-3^ rms. S87.50-$11J 
Supt or PL 5-1370. 



LEW IS-LOADON MANVILLE RL_ 

34-ROOM GARDEN APTS 

-rlvale entrances in countrified settim 

convenient to 

schools, shopping &. transportation 

-ee Supt RO«ers 9-329 

LEWIS-LOADON 4Vi rm modem garti 
"' '"""»'« M - V "-■ -'■'■' ,V ' " 



Homes — Pennsylvania 



it i j T»o Houses $37. $00 

One a yr round modem Ranch with 
3 or 4 bdrms. The other a delight- 
ful rustic house usable for a long 

Beautiful 3^ acrci with wide view. 

DAVID H. BATCHELDER 

Wilton. POrtcr 2-3365 



tEDDING. Dt-llicMful serl lummrr h-- 
Small— easy care 4 woodel acres 
frplc. cathedral llv rm $19 900 Wk 
*nds— WE 8-2880 NY wk eve 
MU 5-0140. 

ItlDGEFIELD. 3 newlv decorated room- 



UIDGEWOOD 5-rm garden apts Jl*. 
April & later occ Nr shops fk. tui. . 
>e e supt. 286 Oak St. Gl 4-9213. 

ROSELLE, Garden 'Type Apts 

"EXCLLSIVC BUT 

NOT EXPENSIVE" 

3 RMS $96; 3'/2 RMS $102 

2Bdrm Apts 4-$l 12; 416 $125 



BUS DIRECT TO NYC 
(25 MIN STOPS AT DOOR) 
SHOPPING 100 YARDS AWAY 
400 ACRE PARK WITH 
LAKE ADJOINING. 

Warrir.anco Village Apts 

ST GEORGE AV ad) Warrlnanco Pk 

See Supt Apt 6C or Assistant Supt 34A 

Chestnut 5-1910— Chestnut t-1688 

tOWAYTON Area Ne» England salt 
box on woooded lot. 3 double bedrms 
'^ bths 15*22 llv rm fireplace, built- 
n cupboards & bookcases Radiant 
teat. 2-car garage, nr schools. Beach 
>rlvlleges Asking $30.800. VO 6 - 1796 



ROWAYTON. for less than $20,000 
?ape Cod. rolling partly wooded 1/' 
•C. beach prlvlR Owner NY GR 7-917( 
ext 830. wkdays. Norwalk: PO 6-3704 
ROWAYTON. Colonial 3 bedrms. m 

baths. 2-car gar $35,000 

DOU GLAS B ORA Agcy TE 8-5518 

CRAWFORD"* bdrms or more. Over- 

lookr Inlet. Rental-purchase HI S30'« 
PI TT NYC. M U 8-2355 Stmfd DA 2-168 f 
CHAW Ft»RD"Falr*le,d Woods) 1 bdra 

Rai lroad 6 mln $35 940 FI 8-4115* 
Ml \\\ I t>|(l» Pre* fUJl E<.l.itr Map 
Inciuaes nnuse pnotos-Harry Bennett 
.vssoc Hign Ridge Rd. DavU 2-1684. 

R fc-< J Kfcfcf.VVIC|| — VICINITY -- 

NEW T ERRACE APTS 

BEAUTIFUL, SPACIOUS GROUNDS 

3^ RMS FROM $140 

JR 4 RMS FROM S150 

5 RMS. 2 BATE'S FROM $180 

6 BEAUTIFUL ROOMS $225 

Hollywood kitchens dishwasher built 

in ovens, gar space avail. Immed occ 

LONGVIEW TERRACE 

315-325 King St Port Chester 

Shops— Schools- RR within 3 block. 

iupt on premises. WE 9-753. 

RJK. 1V4 & 3' 5 . $175 & $140 

1ST FLR, MODERN. AIR COND 

EXCELLENT LOCATION. WO 7-3239 



Homes — Kentucky 



ADAIR Modern, i 1 - rms. 2 blh- 

terrace, garage. Near station, shop 

>>n g. WO 7-0947 

ADAIR rm gd n apt. grd fir, excel 
loc. prof or residential Avail July 1 
^ee Supt 18 1 Purchase St WQ 7-458 



MONTGOMERY 

30 YR FHA MORTGAGE 

3 bdrms. fpt. tile bath. gar. nr schls 
Full price $16,600. Prln only. FUlton 
l-307f. 



RAHWAY-Owner selling fi rm Ranch 

3 yrs old. many extras Asking $21,90( 
G ood com tlng Call after 5. FU 1-5592 
MONTGOMERY 27 PARK LANE, 

FAIR HAVEN. 8-yr corner ranch: 
3 bdrms: TV rm: dine rm; full cel- 
lar: 2 flrpls: patio. Splendid condi- 
tion. 100x115. beaut lawn, shrubs, 
trees: oak. pine, dogwood, holly: near 
river, ocean. Attractive price. Action 
wanted! Owner: Demlingcr. SHadyslde 
7-055*. 
MONTGOMERY RUMSON 

FARMS ESTATES RiVERFRONT 
ELLEN HAZELTON RUMSON 1-2003 



Homes— West Virginia 



BARBOUR charm of this gracious 
Colonial with wide Center Hall Large 
living & dining rooms, both with 
fireplaces, den with built-in book- 
selves, pantry, kitchen & lavatory on 
1st fir. Upstairs a master bedroom 
with dressing room & bath. 4 other 
bedrooms & bath 3rd fir has nice 
bedroom, bath dc storage. 3 car gar- 
age. Excellent location Offered at 
$44000. 

16 Oak St. Rldgewood. 

OLlver 2-5400 



I! \1U(i>l II VIC. SADDLE BITER 

GEORGIAN COLONIAL 

With wide center hall, spacious llv 
ing room, fireplace, full dining room 
kitchen, family room with a llreplact 
and all the latest bulll-lns. SIX love 
ly bedrooms. 3 tile baths, full base- 
ment. 2 car attached garage. Extra: 
Include wall-to-wall carpet, Intercom- 
washei & dryer, dishwasher, refrigera- 
tor-freeier. wall oven. etc. S65.0U0 
STOP AT THE PINK BRICK RANCH 
2nd traffic light west of Route #17 
MULTIPLE LISTINGS 
906 E- Rldgewood Avenue 
OLIVER 2-0883 Open Sunday: 



MARICOPA 

Early American farmhouse, completely 
modernized. 1st fir den or 4th bedrm. 
full dining rm. modern kitchen, spa- 
clous living rm, 3 bedrooms & new tile 
bath on 2d. Full basement. Garage. 
Lots ol charm here lor only $20,500 

Picture Book Cape Cod Immaculate 
condition. Fireplace, porch. 4 bedrooms, 
2 baths, rec rm. Garage, Completely 
Landscaped. Offered at owner's actual 
cost of $33,000, 

Many Others from $16,900 Up 
10 So. Maple Ave. Rldgewood G I 5-607 7 

MARICOPA & VIC. 
WE SPECIALIZE IN FINDING HOMES 

FOR OUT OF TOWN BUYERS 
LIBERAL FINANCING AVAILABLE 



Homes — Mississippi 



PONTOTOC OUT-OF-TOWNERS 

OVER 500 MULTIPLE LISTINGS 

SITHENS REAL ESTATE GI 5-9000 

158 Franklin Ave.. Rldgewood 

OPEN SUNDAYS AND EVENINGS 



Rldgewood. Clse bus-train 

Gd school — 4 bdrm— l 1 ? bth— fam rm— atl 
gar, $24,800. Owner Gilbert 5-9712 



PONTOTOC •TTuuse-O-Kama ' seleo 

tlons. Save time-effort. Schuitz & 

Trovato 81 N o M aple Av e OL 2-2660 

PONTOTOC Col. 3 bdrms. den. 1^ 

baths, laun rm. por. gar. $26,900 

Gllsenan & Co. Gilbert 5-1600 



PONTOTOC vie. 1737 center hall 

Dutch col 4-acre. 3 flrepl; "In-law" 

wing. Must see! Jud Corbln CI 5-7226 



I't t N I 1 1 1 1 ii 6-bedrm col home. 3 
bths, den. rec rm. 2-car att gar. In 
the 50 s. Shutts-Shutts. OL 2-3510. 



PONTOTOC 4 bedrms. lVi bths. 

d ,shw a ,h r,.fr, r jlj-LUH.JIJ 



Homes — Connecticut 



SHORT HILLS M.-.i,, b.auttfuM Over 

acre, beautifully shrubbed; custom 

modified ranch. Geo. Allsopp DRexel 



SO. MIDDLESEX -2 bdrm Cape Cod 

with lias heat and ^arjge, GI mort- 
gage, lot 50x100. Phone PL 5-4680. 
(NJ). 



SOUTH RIVER. LocaU-d In Middlesex 
County, attract 7-room Colonial, large 
llvrm with granite flrepke. dining rm 
sun parlor. 3 bdrs 2-car garage. 80x100 
lot $19 900 mice assumed, oftly !2 901 

Near NY express buses. CL_ 7-1870 

SPRING LAKE It >r old home consist. 

Ing of 4 be-lrms. 2 baths, living rm. 

dining rm. kitchen, hot water heat. 1 



SPRING LAKE. Only brand now 3 bed- 
room Split, storms & screens. $26 iOO 
Principals Clbson 9-8895 



STAMFORD— RELOCATED OWNER 

Must sell l-yr-old charming Ranch in 
No Stamford area with gracious living 
for a commuting executive. On 1.7 
acres with stream-fed natural swim- 
ming pool and in immaculate condi- 
tion. Ent hall, llv rm w/fpl. dining 
rm. panel brkfst rm, kit w/appls. 4 
bdrms, 2 bths. panl family rm. Lndry 
2-car gar. A tine buy at $46,500. 

BOB MEEK 

FAIRFIELD COUNTY PROP 

Bedford A 4 St DA 5-4197 

STAMFORD 

BUILDER'S SACRIFICE 

Colonial Ranch on om 2 acres. 
Easv commuting. Porch entrance, 
flagstone foyer 40' living rm. 
flrepl. dinlne m panld den. 
equipped kltch. brkfst rm. 4 bdrms 
3 baths, playrm. frpl. basemt. attic. 
2-car gar. Aske $63. W 

KENNETH IVES & CO. 

961 High Ridge Rd. DA 2-3441 

14 E 55 St. NYC MU fi-1900 



STRATFORD. Prr- Revolutionary home 
in Putney. Center hall Colonial with 
t bedrooms on second floor. 1 on third 

1 living rooms, dining ro>m newly re 
nodeled kitchen with dishwasher. Firs' 
floor utility room, basement playroom 

2 baths. 11 closets. 5 fireplaces, screened 
torch. Acre lot. large swimming pool 

Owner transferred — $34,900. 
Two minutes to Mcrrltt Parkway and 
en minutes to Connecticut Thruway. 
Contact TFX 5187 Times, 



nded 



old 



150 yr old remodeled farmrn 
.n« rm. dining rm. both with fire- 
places, den. 4 bedrms. 2 baths Big 
bam, little playhouse. Owner Trans 
erred $52,000 

EXCLUSIVELY SHOWN BY 

ULLA POSNANSKY 

U>ng_Rldge_a t Erskinc DA 2 - 269 

>TAMFORD Ridge* 

An Immaculate 3 bedroom 2 bath 
split In young neighborhood Llv rm 
w/fp). din rm kltch 1/3 landscaped 
acre. Won't last at $26,900 
JANE CYPRES DA 2-1675 

_996 Hig h Ridge Rd. o pen Sun 
STAMFORD. A loss Partnership dis- 
solving, sell at loss Saw Mill Rd, Co 
'onlal. 2 acres, lake 3300 sq ft living 
irea. landscaped, reduced from $55 000 
■o $48,200 This wont last long. 1st 

IsttPg. NE 7-2041. DA 4-9366. 

STAMFORD Beautiful one acre house 
Sites $7,500 to $8,500. Also available 
i rm ranch. $37,000 
Merrltt Pkwy. Den Rd exit follow signs 

Barclay Estates; DA 5-105 5 

iTAMFD. Ranch 1+ acre, lib— rec rm 
with flrepl, 3 bdrms 2 baths. $48,500 
Jeo. CastlesDA 2-1601. 
STAMFORD Distinctive home. 3 bed- 
rms. 3 baths, swim pool $55,000 

ja c k M claughlin, d a 2-1651 

iTAMFD. Desirable split lev Game rm, 
fplcs, 3 bdrms. 2 bths. $29,000. 
CABLE Rlty. FI 8-4247. 



MIDDLESEX Rldgecroft Apts. View ol 

natural beauty conven to everything 
IS rms $120 mo ME 1-179L 



MIDDLESEX vie. 3H & 4Vi rms from 
$130. Swimming pool Cedar Hill gar- 
lens 35 So Bway Irvington LY l-840t 



Homes— Virginia 



BOTETOl RT Englewood. On Trafalgar 

St 9 rm. brk & stone 4 Ddrms. 3 
othr 2 lav fam rm, scrnd por. r-c rm 
2 -tr gar. Ige prop. $69,900 Owr.er 

TEane ck 6-5372. 

BOTETOl RT' 900 4 bdrm Cipc Cod 

att earage, brick screened porch, sem 
finished recreation rm. $15 000. 5V- 
mtg may be assumed TE 3-0316 



$24,990. 7-rro split 8 yrs ? 
nlshed rec rm. ex pan attic 
rslzed gar. 65x150 plot A f . 
Iras, nr everything TE 6-165; 



bsmt. heated 

extras. $39 .900. Prlnc only. TE 7-7734 

'butler 

ROARING 20'S 

Colonial— 3 bedrooms, m baths, living 
room, big dining room, large kitchen 

2 car garage , $22,500 

Ranch— 8 year old. living room-din- 
ing room combination with fireplace 
modern kitchen. 3 bedrooms, tile bath 
attached garage lovely location $23500 

Colonial— Stone and frame, excellent 
transportation and school area, foyer 
entrance, lar^-o U- ing room with fire- 
place, family slic dining room. paneleC 
den. farm kitchen with dining area 

3 bedrooms, finished paneled recreation 
room, patio and <arage $24 900 

Colonial— Brick and frame. 9 years 
yiurn; living room with fireplace, din- 
ing room, bnght kitchen. 1^, baths 
attached garage, beautiful grounds 

$25 90f 

Colonial— Mellow and roomy, music 
room living room dining room, mod- 
ern kitchen 5 bedrooms. 2 new tile 
batlis, excellent location $27,800 

SMITH-DAVIS, Inc. 



ilv Rd_ 'IVl 



1 fly 



LOwell 7-1166 



"•3 C"i 
III ILF.lt Young 3-b.irm. l^-bth cu 

Col M firpl. beaut area. $25,900 

Fr ank Dupignac, LP 7-4300 

Ft UTI.flt Superb Dutch Colonial; 

Old Smith section: wooded knoll. 

brook; $55,000. Garrett Felter. LOwell 

8-2142 



TENAFL 

& batn. 
James E 


\ Mre; 1st fir mas 

20x^a family rm. 
Hanson & Co. TE 


er bdrm 
$55,000 
7-3800 



1ENXFL Sparkling Dutch Col 
bdi ms. den. flrepl , $22,900. 

Realty. LO 7-5550; 7-1313 

TENAFL E Hill— 4 bdrm 
Immed occupy— w, w. [rp! 

Prestige' $43.900 Jack Smlt) 



bin Cape 

LO 7-0089 



TENAFL E. "lit Beautiful U 
plots. Models on display K & L 
om Homes DU 5-6038: PO 8 
TOTOWA BOKO. 
6 1 -- rms. l-fam, ultra mod In 
respect. Holly kitchen col till 
bath, Ige llv rm w/pict - 



arpet. dining 
nit & ■ 



fin 



Indow, 
.. all mirrored 
bsmt playrm. 2 off- 



radiation. Ask $24,900. "Exclus" 



Homes— Alabama 



Jnion. Rnch, 3 bdrm, IV2 bths 

flreplc. large finished rm upstairs: suit- 
able professional or priv; prlncpl only: 
■ sklng $30.000 Murdock 6-0384 



M ( > NTGOMER Y LA KG E HOME) 
IDEAL LOCATION FOR PROFES- 
SIONAL USE MURDOCK 6-755Q. 



( HFItoKEE 10 mln Times Sq. 3 f 

tJliiiiii^HMiHH 



Homes — Vermont 



VINELAND— 6 rm*. llle bth on 17$ » 

lfiO corner, paved sts. plenty trees 

PLUS 1 place parage w.lav. & slnH 

EASILY CONVERTED TO DR S OFC 



WAKEFIELD, brk d. i I fam L6. 1-7. 

full bsmt, l fai . _ 
i vim; $24,500. Cash $6,000. 
JEROME Reservoir vie. brk del 
corner 1-6 1-9 extra Ige rms. full bsm|, 
►II. 2 car det gar Exc oppty profes- 
lonal use $50 000, if rms. 
PELHA PARKWAY NORTH, 



. full I 



pat! 



let gar Asking $22 500 
VIANY OTHERS OPEN TODAY 

Colonial— 3 bedrooms, m bathl llvlns 
room, big dining room, large kitchen 

2 car garage $22,500 

Ranch— 8 year old. living room-din- 

Ing room combination with fireplace 
modern kitchen. 3 bedrooms, tile bath 
attached garage lovely location $23 500 
Colonial— Stone and frame, excellent 
transportation and school area, foyer 
entrance, large Ii- Ing room with fire- 
place family size dining room, paneleC 
den. farm kltcnen with dlninc area 

3 bedrooms, finished paneled recreation 
room patio and parage $24 900 

Colonial-Brick and frame. 9 years 
young, living room with fireplace, din- 
ing room, bright kitchen. lVj baths 
attached garage, beautiful grounds. 

$25 90^ 

Colonial— Mellow and roomy, music 
room, living room dining room, mod- 
ern kitchen. 5 bedroom*. 2 new tile 

baths, excellent location $27,800 

552 E. 23 ST KI 7-8704 



WAKEFIELD 2 fam brlrk 6 A 7 rat, 

plot 33x177, Price 529.000 
KIEFHABER OL 2-8001 



•VARREN ST. 42. 23x100 store, bsmt <'■) 
lofts 1 .000'. nr sub rent all-part. 
brokers prot. P. Hlrth OX 7-6299. 



WASHINGTON 2 fim brick, \l 

rms. 2>n baths, parquet firs. oil. nr 
transp. Asking $18,900 MA 2-4347 



Homes — New York 



CANARSIE 

WE HAVE A CHOICE SELECTION 

OF ALMOST NEW 1 & 2-FAMILY 

Bungalows Duplexes & Split Levels 

EXISTING VA & FHA MTGES. 

OTHER RESALES ALSO AVAIL. 

TOP DOLLAR VALUES 

OPEN EVERY DAY 

TERRY RXTY 9105 AV L CL 1-1200 



BAY 


RIDGE 


Hi 


St. detached 


family 


8 spacious 




>nu. 24 bath 


. large 


living 




th 


open fireplace 






flrrt fl 




cheerful kitchen. In- 


spect 


today i 


nd 


make offer 





EXCLUSIVE LISTING! 

3/ 4 

MILLION 
MORE 
HOMES 

A CHOICE INVESTMENT 



This season the average 
nighttime program on the 
CBS Television Network 
delivers 785,000 more U.S. 
homes than the second net- 
work, 996,000 more homes 
than the third. This makes 
the seventh straight year 
that our advertisers are 
winning the biggest na- 
tionwide audiences in 
television. As appraised 
from A. C. Nielsen Reports 
I October 1960-1 March 
1961, 6 to 11 pm, AA basis. 

BEST LOCATION 

CBSTELEVISION NETWORK 




OUTS 



BKLYN HEIGHTS. 4 story bldg with 
four 6 rms-bath apis..* garden, oil 
heat Ideal Ige family. Only $10,000 
cas h req. Owner call ev e s. MA 4-241 9 
BKLYN HOHTS, Cobble Hill. Charming 
2-famlty. $22 000 4 family, excel cond. 
$30,000. 1/3 cash. Evelyn Brown, Bkr 
J A 2-4624. 



Homes— Georgia 



vVESTPORT BLUEWATER HILL 



$40,000. Ow 



BLECKLEY Dutch Colonial $22.$00 
Perfect cond central loc, 7 rms. : 
»drms, brick fireplace, full din rm. Ig* 
;ltch with pantry 3- car gar, spill 
all fence. CApltal 7-8224. 



BLECKLEY. WF.STON-NORWALK 

1-4 bedrm homes. Priced from $34.50X 
I. S DOLAN CA 7-8013 



BLECKLEY 

5 bedrooms. 2^ baths, $34,500 
Fairfield Land & Title CL 6-045C 



BLECKLEY Large 



Homes — New Hampshire 



rVESTI XIMMll l.-nevi ipllt levrl 1<W. 
community. 5 rms, 4 bdrms, recrea 
Ion room, fireplace. 2-car garage, den 
VA balhs, on dead-end str- ■ 
Tall for appointment, days RE 6-1790 
•vcDlngs. RE 1-3579 or Inquire 9 Lin- 
lin CI West Orange. 



Home 



WENT < 



1 built ranch 
skyline. 7 
s. Jaluusled porch, 4-car gar 
carpet, full drapes. Ice watei 
extras, leaving slale. $50.00( 
$45. 50 RE 1-545* 



WEST ORANCiE-Orcgory sectlo 

bedroom home carpeted, mot! 
jlr-condltloned plus many extr 
venlngs Call REdwood 1-6137 



I, litre* 

Tiilzed 
S. C-K 



vVILTON 



NORWALK 



$?5.500-Contemporary built-in HI Fl 
Excellent scrtonls-3 bedrooms 

29.500- Con temporary- beautiful wood- 
land -4 bedrooms-3 baths 

32 500-Contemp-aitrac landsc acre 
playrm-2 f plcs-3 bdrms-2 B 

JAMES E. GREENBERG 

44 Riverside Av Westport CA 7-1002 



WILTON 


Col r 


inch, 4 


yrs old. 


2 acr« 








rm. d 




2 bin- 






ipl a 


r cond 




to RR 








$40 000 


Owner 


Portei 


!-3430 













Homes — Massachusetts 



WILTON CNTRY privacy, splendor 
small lot development prices 3 bdrm 
anch. ac. + Bldr. PO 2-3088 



WILTON. River & falls-l story. 7 rms 

3 baths. 2 acs $49,500 

S HORELINE REAL EST ATE PO 2-5548 
WHITE ST. SI, nr Canal St. 4.000 sq 

ft store-2 bsmnts. Air cond. Hi cell. 
.Ivy load etc Prlc $12 000 BO 9 -8HH0. 



WHITE MEADOW LAKE. 3 bedroom 

furnished ranch house Oil heat. April 
•lay, June. $125 mo, 23 Miami Trail 
'all UNIon 9-0056. 

WHITETSJEADOwVK. S9.2S0 Beaut 
l-bdrm home overlooks lake. Herbert 
Chwartz Br. WO 2-3454. OA 7-2500(NJ' 



HAMPSHIRE Lake 6 rm brk & stone 
ranch, fully landsc l 1 ^ *c. lg<* equlpp#< 
■>wlm pool, barbecue. Pvt rd 3 lg- 
bdrms. 2 bths, Ige llv rm. fpl. cei 
hall, Ige din rm. mod kit. dlshwshr & 
efrlg. Ige fin recr rm w.bar and fpl 
Laun rm equlppel; 2-car garage, paved 
irlveway, Conv location ..$50.00t 

$24.000 mtce. PA 6-3752. NJ 



WOODCLIFF LAKE Custom brick 
stone ranch 24' kitchen, half-acre 
;47.800. Thomas Bustard. NOrth 4-76tt' 



Homes — New Jersey 



VILL GREEN »< u < h 

95 NORTH BROADWAY 
Beautiful garden apts In elegant Geor- 
gian setting: 3V* & 4Vj rms from $135, 
tree outdoor parkins, near schonls 
ihopplng & all transp. Supt WH 8-5116 
ESSEX-IIl'DSON 325 MAIN ST 

LUXURY ELEVATOR BLDG 

Huge 5V2 (3 Bedrms) 

I BATHS. TERRACE, DISHWASHER 

ALSO 4 ROOMS 
Convenient to shopping & schools . 
.mmed occ up Supt or WH 6-0395 



ESSEX-HUDSON' 1IJ NORTH BWAY 

Beautifully landscaped garden apt 

4 RMS (1 BATHl, S155-S160 

5 RMS 1 2 BEDRMS I . $175 
Sxccl location EN 2-8900 WH 9-3911 



Homes— Maryland 



PRINCE GEORCJ3 

,eaull fully landscaped garden apts 
ms. $118. 4 1 -. rms. $150 WH 8-59QB 



WHITE PLAIN . PARK SITE APTS 

I Westchester Av at circle. Modern 
ual elev. bldg 34 4 1 -, Agent on prem 



WHITE PLAINS 

THE WESTBROOK 

Modern Elevator Apanments 

Short Walk to Schools & Shops 

Doorman Service 

'R 3 ROOMS $125 

IVi RMS 12 Bathsi $170 

5V, RMS (3 Baths) $195 

iO Franklin Ave. See Sup! RO 1-247: 



WHITE PLAIN 

44 NORTH BROADWAY 

. STORY MODERN ELEVATOR APTS 

CENTRALLY LOCATED 

4H Rms from $172 

Supt or phone RO 1-U5-I6 



vVHITE PLAIN VILL GREEN 

95 NORTH BROADWAY 
Beautiful garden apis In elegant Geor- 
gian setting: Vk & ■*'-- rms from $135. 
iee outdoor parking; near schools. 
chopping & all transp. Supt WH 8-5116 
WHITE PLAIN 325 MAIN ST 

LUXURY ELEVATOR BLDG 

Huge 5 ] /2 (3 Bedrms) 

2 BATHS. TERRACE. DISHWASHER 

ALSO 4 ROOMS 
Convenient to shopping & schools. 
■mmed occup. Supt or WH 6-0395 



VHITE PLAIN 111 NORTH BWAY 

Beautifully landscaped garden apt. 

4 RMS ll BATHl. $155-$160 

5 RMS i2 BEDRMS). $175 
;xcel location EN 2-8900 WH 9-3811 



Homes— South Carolina 



HF.srFHFIELD 

.eautlfully landscaped garden apts 
ms. $118. 44 rms. 5150 WH 8-5908 



CHESTERFIELD, PARK SITE APTS 
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NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 

'THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR INTEGRITY' 




by Joe Csirfa 



';.'. ?::.. :.._:/ 




Fools rush in' 

No angel in his right mind would tread in the 
mi\ -lit land of radio and television program prog- 
nostication. Certainly not prognostication over 
a period of the next ten years in this era when 
the world daily shrinks ever closer to the size 
of a pea, and events move almost literally with 
the speed of light. But Norman Glenn and the 
Ohio Broadcasters Association evidently know 
where to find at least a few fools who will readily walk in where the 
angels won't. Norman practically set it up for me to talk to the 
Ohio Broadcasters this Friday, 7 April, at their Spring convention in 
Greenhrier on programing in the sixties. And if I'm going to make 
myself look a little silly in front of a couple of hundred Ohio broad- 
casters I don't see why I shouldn't give sponsor's nationwide audi- 
ence a glimpse into the same Csida de luxe crystal ball. 

As far as I can see, the only way to come anywhere near w hat 
may turn out to be the programing pattern of the sixties is to re\ ien 
today's programing and the current forces at work, which seem 
most likely to have an effect on what kind of shows we'll see and 
hear in the next decade. The greatest single force, I believe, is the 
point I mentioned in my lead: the rapid internationalization now 
going on in every portion of the world, as related to every other 
portion of the world. As you know, even in this quite frigid cold 
war atmosphere, Britain and Russia have been linked television-wise, 
and in the immediate future will have an interchange of programs. 
The Russians will see the British Trade Fair, live, and the English 
will have a telecast of the Soviet May Day parade. 

This internationalization must inevitably reflect itself in both the 
radio and television program fare of the future. Another quite 
obvious force at work these days, and one which also must have its 
nun influence on shows in the next 365 days is man's steadih in- 
creasing penetration of space. Now that the Russians have a man 
in space, it is inevitable that over the next ten years we will have 
an increasing amount of radio and television time devoted to 
fictional and factual matters dealing with the planets, the galaxii^. 
their flora, fauna and people, or things, if any. 

Here to stay 

In addition to these broad global and cosmic pressures, radio andj 
t<lc\ ision programs in the next decade will also, of course, be greatbl 
influenced by more immediate and continuing domestic pressure? 
There is little doubt in my mind, for example, that over the next ten 
years government interest in programing will remain at a high level 
if the government doesn't decide to actually move into the program! 
ing picture. This is particularly true of television. Whether thi| 
(Please turn to page 15) 



10 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 196 








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Sponsor backstage {Continued from page 10 I 



Kennedy administration wins itself a second term, and thus carries 
irough eight of the ten years we're covering, or whether it doesn't, 
do not believe that any administration is likely to come into office 
hich would not take a most active interest in television programing. 

At the present time, indeed, the new president of the National 
issociation of Broadcasters, LeRoy Collins, himself, of course, is 
rging a type of quality programing he calls "Blue Ribbon" on the 
ation's broadcasters. Against pressures of this kind, naturally, 
lere will be the constant, and I believe increasing, economic pres- 
ures on the nation's radio and television networks and stations. Like 
very other business in America, broadcasters are faced with rapidly 
ising costs, a most drastic squeeze on profits, with no real end in 
ght. This obviously makes it essential that broadcasters manage 
> attract the greatest possible mass audience, at least in prime time. 
[ they do not or cannot attract such audiences they will have great 
ifficulty earning a reasonable profit for their stockholders and may 
>se valuable ground to other media such as newspapers, magazines, 
lc. These two pressures have been with us since broadcasting be- 
an, but the significance of them today is that each has increased 
1 intensity to a peak never before known to the industry. 

It says here in my crystal ball that the net result over the next 
ecade will be more true public service programing, more educational 
nd quality programing in prime time than ever before. I should 
dd that a couple of other forces will contribute to this picture: 

(1) President Kennedy's broadcast and televised press conferences 
lemselves are interesting more people in the more serious issues. 

(2) Long before the Kennedy administration has run its course 
will be responsible for utilizing radio and television to bring to 

le people in dramatic and fascinating documentary form programs 
n virtually all the key issues, domestic, international and interspace, 
f the day. The Kennedy administration will utilize show business 
nd broadcasting pros to a degree no administration before ever has. 

(3) Over the next ten years the educational program in our 
ountry will be stepped up and improved at such a rate that more and 
tore of the people will find public affairs shows as fascinating or 
■ore than they now find The Untouchables and Gunsmoke. 

Age of specialization 

In radio programing the intensified competition among phono- 

taph record companies, plus the equally intense struggle for busi- 
es between the stations themselves will have a decided effect on 
rograming in the sixties. .More and more stations will be forced 
<to seeking a specialized niche, and more and more record com- 
anies will be supplying product to program toward developing 
fecial niches. Editorializing on the part of broadcasters will in- 
ease and become more and more effective in the next ten years, 
ews programs will take on new forms and dimensions. 
Pay television will have the tendency to upgrade and improve 
ee-tv programing. The Telemeter operation in Etobicoke gave its 
istomers Menotti's The Consul, Carol Channing's Broadway revue 
how Girl and Bob Newhart in recent months. Free tv will have to 
(ove onward and upward to buck that kind of competition. 
All in all the next ten years are going to be exciting ones in radio 
id television program development, as they are in every other 
spect. And that's enough treading for one fool. ^ 



'ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



GOOD 

NEWS! 

6 out of 10 copies 
of SPONSOR go to 
BUYERS OF TIME! 



15 



STORY 




T. R Effic! 



WTRF-TV liZl 



IN A REDUCING PAR- 
LOR . if BEFORE 
we're after 1 '' 

THE THING most women dread 
ength. 

Wheeling wtrf-tv 

KAREN COED reports that when an Ohio 
State Prof asked Mike to name two ancient 
sport corns Mike answered "Anthony and 
Cleopatra '" 

wtrf-tv Wheeling 

DID|A HEAR about Metrecal gett.ng an award 
. . . The Nobelly prize J Or the lady South of 
the Border who dieted herself back to her 
former sve'teness . . and whose proud hus- 
band called her his "Metrecali Rose?" 

Wheeling wtrf-tv 
TWO BUSINESS MEN were talk ng "Is your 
advertising getting results?" inquired the first 
"It sure is 1 " moaned the second "Last week 
we advertised for a nightwatchman and the 
next night we were robbed." 

wtrf-tv Wheeling 

ADVERTISING RESULTS in the Wheeling- 
Steubenville industrial Ohio Valley are suc- 
cessfully delivered by the big and buying tv 
audience dominated by WTRF TV from 
Wheeling Ask George P. Ho!lingbsry to give 
you the specifics 

Wheeling wtrf-tv 

DIDJA NOTICE? A man's horse sense seems 

to divert him whenever he's feeing his oats 

wtrf-tv Wheeling 

|ust REMEMBER, nudism is merely a different 
way of looking at things! 

Rep George P. Hollingbery 



CHANNEL 
SEVEN 



WHEELING, 
WEST VIRGINIA 




• MATURE, ESTABLISHED 
PERSONALITIES * AWARD 
WINNING NEWS • EX- 
CLUSIVE HELICOPTER 
TRAFFIC REPORTS • 
FIGHTING EDITORIALS • 
ADULT MUSIC • 



WPE 

THE STATION OF THE STARS 
CALL GILL-PERNA, INC. 



16 







Timebuyers 
at work 




Irving I. Herz, executive v. p. of Co-Ordinated Marketing Agenc 
Inc., New ^ ork. relates. "In buying time for our clients, who are 
primarily concerned with the food field. I take two distinct ap- 
proaches . . . one for programs and one for spots. For radio and 
tv programs. I am not a strong believer in strict cost-psr-thousand. 
More important is the type of au- 
dience it reaches, the program it- 
self, and the loyalty of the lis- 
tener to the personality involved. 
These are the factors that make a 
program successful and of positive 
commercial value. Within this 
framework. I permit the person- 
ality a great deal of leeway. I 
suppl) him with a fact sheet on 
the product, instead of a prepared 
commercial. In this way, he can 
tone the copy to his own audience, 
using his own formula for success, with the result that the mo- 
is delivered with more sincerity and authenticity. In buying spots, 
( ost-per-thousand is of greater importance. Often, I try to develop 
a saturation effect by dividing the budget into weekly amounts, 
spending the entire week's budget on one station for one week, 
switching to a second the next week, etc." 

Bill Yuroka, Metropolitan Advertising. New York, feels that buyers 
must take advantage of the information provided by all the station 
representatives for a given market to get a comprehensive picture. 
"All survevs made by various stations in a given market- do not covei 
the same points. Naturally, each rep utilizes market data in term- 

of his own station, but when 
place the facts side by side. 
can pretty much determine mai 
ket patterns. I do not minimi/' 
ratings, but rather consider sta 
tion ratings in terms of the audi 
ence desired. The top-rated |>i 
gram on the top-rated station ma 
not bring you the biggest buyin 
audience for your client's produi i 
The third or fourth station in 
market max be a better Inn f" j 
vour particular needs. We'> 
found programing especially helpful in sizing up a station's am 
cine, and I always apply the question, 'why do they listen?' 1 1 
answer gives vou a good idea of audience character and its rece^ 
tiveness to the product. We've gotten excellent sales results an 
have eliminated unnecessar) waste circulation from our schedules. 




SI'ONSOI! 



17 APRIL I"' 



TWO- 
TIME 

WINNER 




19-year-old 
Eddie 
Rohrer, Jr. 



p. April, KDKA-TV received the duPont award for public service 
rogramming. Q The citation carried with it a cash award of One 
Ihousand Dollars ($1,000.00), and the station was afforded the 
rivilege of granting a scholarship for that amount. Q A year 
:irlier, the station had won the Edison Award for service to youth. 
'., too, carried a cash award which KDKA-TV decided to turn into 
: scholarship fund. Only question: how do you choose from thou- 
finds of students the one most deserving? CQJ KDKA-TV officials 
;irned the problem over to Pittsburgh educational leaders. Eddie 
tonrer was selected. fyp He began his studies and did exception- 
ally well. But throughout the year, Eddie pondered: how would 
ke complete his college education? Q Luckily, the same question 
incurred to KDKA-TV officials upon receipt of the duPont award. 



I DKA-TV Pittsburgh, Pa. ®g 

i 

^NSOR • 17 APRIL 1961 



~ WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING CO.. INC. Represented by TvAR v !r 



17 



!■ 







- Philip Salisbury, Editor & Publisher 
Sales Management 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



Atlantic 
Ocean 



L8 



SPONSOR • 17 APRIL 19< 



NEW 
JERSEY 




DID YOU KNOW: 



■ That Tidewater, Va., while classified as one of the 
nation's 16 "boom" areas, and growing at 2 ] 2 times 
the national rate, was, in the latest FCC report 
(for 1959), the only one of the top 40 TV markets 
that did not show a gain in national spot billings. 
But in the same year, local TV billings rose to an 
all-time high! 

■ Most of Virginia's recent industrial growth has 
been in this area; Dow Chemical, Union Carbide, 
Amoco, Esso, C&O, Lone Star Cement, Cargill 
Grain, Union Bag-Camp, Hercules Powder, Ply- 
mouth Cordage, Lipton's Tea, Nestle, Phillips 
Petroleum, Coats &' Clark, Century Industries, 
Tidewater Oil, and others have built new plants or 
major additions in past 10 years. $128 million has 
been invested in new electric generating plants alone ! 

■ Here is the world's largest and finest natural 
harbor — America's largest port in foreign commerce 
tonnage; it would take 665 average size industrial 
plants to equal it in jobs and payroll. Moreover, a 
new $75 million port development program has 
just begun! 

■ The shipbuilding industry here employs 30,000 
civilians. 

■ Approximately half of the huge military and 



federal payroll here is civilian payroll. And the 
military half conceals a hidden plus of over $200 
million in effective buying income never seen in 
standard marketing statistics! 

■ Here is the greatest concentration of people in the 
entire Southeast — more than 817,000 people in half 
the area of metro Atlanta or Miami ! 

■ Here you can draw a circle of 20-mile radius and 
completely encompass three of Virginia's four 
largest cities. Plus No. 7, and two others! 

■ Though it is the most compact, most densely 
populated metro area in the Southeast, by federal 
definition it is divided into two Standard Metro 
Statistical Areas — which is largely responsible for 
widespread misconceptions and underrating of the 
market. 

■ With some $300 million in construction projects 
currently under way, Tidewater is on the threshold 
of even greater growth. Newsweek recently reported: 
"Once the Chesapeake Bay (bridge-tunnel) crossing 
is completed, Greater Norfolk, the experts say, 
will burst into millions and become the South's 
leading market!" 

WHAT A PLACE TO PUT A TV DOLLAR! 



FOR MORE INFORMATION WRITE TO ANY ONE OF THESE STATIONS AT NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



WAVY-TV 

CHANNEL 10 



WTAR-TV 

CHANNEL 3 



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CHANNEL 13 



PONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



19 



49th and 
Madison 



'Life' extravaganza — who's to blame? 

^ mi are to be commended for your 
thoughtful and searching analysis "I 
the recent television extravaganza 
presented bj Life Magazine (Com- 
mercial Commentary, 27 March). 

There is one question that has been 
left unanswered. Win did the net- 
work allow such a dreadful spectacle 
to he presented to the \ iew ing public? 
Isn't there am one in authority at 
the network level with enough "guts" 
to sa\ no? 

Lawrence \\ ebb 
managing director 
Station Representatives 
Association, Inc. 

N.Y.C. 
I have just had an opportunity to 



read your Commercial Commentary 
on the Life "Twenty-Five Years" pro- 
gram. 

I presume \<>u know that it was not 
produced by the editors of Life but 
1>\ the network which transmitted it 
to the public. 

William E. Matthews 

v.p. & dir. media relations 

and planning 
Young & Rubicam 

vv.c. 

Fashion whirl 

In your fashion world story, 3 April. 
I particularly like the way you have 
compared the various efforts of de- 
partment stores which used television 
to show fashions as they should he 
shown. My colleagues here at Wards 




WAVE -TV viewers have 
28.8% more SNIFFLES 

-and gargle, gurgle and swallow 28.8% 
more products "for the relief of colds"! 

That's because W WE-TV has 28.8% more 
viewers, from sign-on to sign-off. in any 
average week. Source: N.S.I., Dec, 1960. 

CHANNEL 3 • MAXIMUM POWER 
NBC 

LOUISVILLE 

NBC SPOT SALES, National Representatives 




weie impressed with \our profession- 
al handling of this stoi \ . 

\la\ we have permission to reprint 
this Storj for distribution to our re- 
tail stores throughout the count r\ '. / 
We are considering this storj in or- 
der to acquaint all of our store man- 
agers with what is being done in tele- 
vision to promote fashions and store 
image. B\ reprint I mean making 
photographic reproduction of tin 
storj in quantity. 

Bob Warren 
news service manage 
Montgomery Ward 
Chicago. III. 

• 9PONBOB li pleased to Derail the reprinting of i 
article. Those who request (he same should urite 
letter to tin- publisher, 



Yours was a very interesting, wel 
written, accurate, and very fair stori 
to all concerned. This we appreciate 

Mark Klauser 

director, advertisin 
& publicity 

Ohrbach's, Inc. 

N.Y.C. 

Comment on 'no comment' 
The item in the 3 April sponsor- 
scope about D-F-S "side-stepping 
the reps" in connection with their 
L & M spot campaign interested me. 
But. it just ain't so — they haven't 
side-stepped The Katz Agenc) and 
the same is true, I'm sure, of a num- 
ber of other reps. 

So, if D-F-S's response to spon- 
sor-scope re this report was "no 
comment."' I have made one herewith. 
I think it's a comment that needs to 
be made so that others — clients and 
agencies — do not get the impression 
that the traditional structures of On 
business are evaporating. 

\I. S. Kellner 

v.p. in charge of radio 

The Katz Agency 

N.Y.C. 



• The sidestepping Involved reps with null 

in the - ii i a 1 1 t-r markets. 



on 



Permission granted 

I'd like to obtain your permission to 
use some material from an article of 
yours that appeared in your 27 
March 1961 issue. The article was 
on page 38 and was entitled "16 
\\ ays to Improve Your Radio Copy. 

If \ou give me permission to use 
the material I'll incorporate it as 
part of a chapter on radio writing 



20 



SPONSOR 



1 , \IM!1I. I%1 



for a copywriting book I am revising 
for Prentice-Hall. 

Incidentally, proper acknowledge- 
ment will be given your excellent 
publication. 

Philip Ward Burton 
Chairman Adv. Dept. 
Syracuse University 

• We're delighted to approve Mr. Burton's 
request as well as to duly note that an authori- 



tative book on radio eopywriting 
orks. 



in the 



Kind comments 

May we thank you for the accuracy 
with which you have published the 
"Sellers Viewpoint" in the 20 March 
edition of sponsor. 

It's just the way I hoped it would 
come out and I have had several very 
kind comments. 

Jay J. Heitin 
Natl, sales mgr. 
WNBC TV 
New York City 

U S. Radio 

You've done it again! Congratula- 
tions on your move to purchase U. S. 
Radio and USFM. This looks like a 
real move to advance the many fine 



services you have rendered to our 
industry over the years. 

Homer Griffith 
Advertising 
My heartiest personal congratula- 
tions to you and SPONSOR on your 
purchase of U. S. Radio and U. S. 
FM. I couldn't be more pleased par- 
ticularly, of course, at your "hopping 
on the FM bandwagon." With your 
outstanding reputation of SPONSOR 
throughout the country you have 
given the FM industry a welcome 
boost. 

Howard Jeff Forbes 
assistant to the President 
Concern Network, Inc. 

Radio, a fine medium 
Once again in a recent SPONSOR I 
have read the story of a successful 
radio campaign. In the same issue 
there were numerous other radio 
stories. Your recognition of radio 
as a fine advertising medium is ac- 
knowledged. However, the same 
awareness of Western America is an 
integral and permanent part of the 
United States is not equally appar- 
ent. 



I am of course, particularly inter- 
ested in Southern California where 
because of our markets obvious at- 
tributes radio is truly an outstanding 
advertising media. 

Robert M. Light 
President 
S.C.B.A. 
Los Angeles 

• We are ready, willing, anil eager to get 
information on \S est Coast radio successes. Any 
suggestions will he appreciated and promptly 
cheeked out. 

Well worth undertaking 
I should like to express my very, 
very sincere thanks to you for your 
kindness in permitting me to repro- 
duce the page from "Timebuying 
Basics." It is indeed kind of you, 
and I appreciate it. 

You have done a great job with 
sponsor, and I am sure U. S. Radio 
will be another asset to your sta- 
tion. But then, you do well with 
anything you undertake. I certainly 
like your editorials. 

Winslow T. Porter 
Owner-mgr. 
WMMS Radio 
Bathe. Maine 




aars 




From 11:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. Monday through 
Friday, the Jack Paar Show reaches twice as many 
Jiomes per average quarter hour as the other two 
channels together! ( °Dec. 1960 NSI ) 





Average Homes Reached 

per Quarter Hour — 

1 1:30 p.m - 1 :00 am 


Per Cent 


WFLA-TV (NBC) 


18,026 


63.6% 


Station "B" (CBS) 


6,655 


23.2% 


Station "C" (ABC) 


3,700 


13.2% 



LMftneSQ 




NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES. BLAIR-TV 



M//fe-/v GO 



TAMPA - ST 



I'ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



21 



1 






9. 




\ 



Stuck 

on 

us... 





We don't believe in hiding honors under a bushel. Particularly this one. wpix is the only New 
York independent TV station qualified to display the National Association of Broad 
casters' Seal of Good Practice. It's far from being an empty honor — it has -real and 
valuable meaning for you, our advertisers. It is an assurance of specific higher standards 
of programming and commercial practices, wpix is the only independent with the Seal. 

Where are your 60-second commercials tonight? 



NEW YORK'S PR 



S T I G E 



NDEPENDENT 





Interpretation and commentary 
on most significant tv /radio 
and marketing news of the week 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



17 APRIL 1961 

Copyrlfht I Ml 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Nighttime tv network advertisers may find the 40-second station-break a fact of 
business life when the 1961-62 season gets rolling. 

What ABC TV has initiated seems to be evolving into a tactic of self-defense as far as 

its competitors are concerned. 

CBS TV sales is notifying the agencies it does business with that it reserves the right 
to put the 40-second station-break into effect this fall. The letter's implication: it doesn't 
fancy the idea, but it has to protect its position with affiliates. 

It will be recalled that when ABC TV advised agencies of the innovation of the 40-second 
break for the fall Compton's rejoinder was a protest that the network was arbitrarily 
handing over to its affiliates 10 seconds of time paid for by the national advertiser. 

P.S.: NBC TV affiliates this fall will be privileged to take 70-second breaks in the 7:30 
p.m. programing four nights of the week. 



New national spot radio took another surge last week, the second burst of sub- 
stantial buying within a month. 

The availability call with the biggest budget involved was Quaker State Motor Oil 
(K&E) which will use about 120 markets over 13 weeks and at the rate of 15 announce- 
ments a week, starting 2 May. 

Other spot radio activity out of New York: Hellmann's mayonnaise (D-F-S) ; Col- 
gate's Wash V Dry (NCK) ; American Airlines (Y&R). 

In Chicago Burnett was unlimbering quite a spot campaign for Philip Morris' Com- 
manders. The entry of this one as a spring contender among cigarettes in the medium may 
cause some stations to put up the SRO sign re cigarette business. 

Already in there: Camel, Winston, Pall Mall, L&M, Chesterfield, Lucky Strike. 



General Motors and NBC TV have finally wrapped up the details of their $1 
million daytime deal for the third quarter. 

The Oldsmobile and Buick divisions will share practically all of the 59 quarter- 
hours. GM's tv director, Gale Smith, picked the strips in which the company will participate 
during those 13 weeks. 

As part of the daytime sale, NBC TV waived Chevrolet's short-rate billings due for 
taking a hiatus from the Sunday 9-10 p.m. slot. 



NBC TV seems to be stepping up its drive to wean over some of the more im- 
portant spot perennials by holding out the availability of regional hookups. 

The network's baiting the hook with such gambits as these: (1) our scatter and bonus 
plans offer rates that are competitive with spot; (2) we'll help you merchandise your 
network campaign with your distributors and dealers. 

Among the regionals that are NBC TV's current selling targets are Lestoil, Sun Oil and 
Cities Service. What really whetted the network's appetite in the direction of the accounts 
with limited distribution was the sale of the Mitch Miller show to Ballantine (Esty) and 
Falstaff (D-F-S). 

CBS TV's position re regionals: it won't sell them under any circumstances, that is, 
outside of sports. 



17 APRIL 1961 



23 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



SPONSOR-SCOPE last week did a spot check among major agency plannei 
anent media spending prospects and emerged with a brightened picture. 

• Billings levels, especallj in 1\. should run about even with last summer in the pack! 
age goods sector, but not so forte from durables. 

• It'll be an unusually big fall, with the advertising outlay possibly going 15-20% ovefl 
the 1960 level. 

• On a trend basis reports being played bark from consumer centers show sales inching 
upward. 

The morning home radio audience, according to Nielsen's count, showed an 
edge in January over the previous year. 

The a.m. comparison of average homes for January: 

riMESPAN 1960 1961 % change j 

6 to 9 a.m. 5,901,000 5,984,000 +1 

9 to 12 noon 6,857,000 6,956,000 +1 

Note: The figures don'l include that important audience in transit. 



It's five months away but there's a toy account that's offering tv stations a firm 
13-week order for minutes in kid strips as of 11 September. 

The account: DuLuxe Reading Toy Co. (Zlowe). It's for five spots a week. 
Tv stations as a rule hold off confirming more than 60 days from starting date. 



Sellers of spot may have muffed this one : NBC TV and Ayer are talking about 
getting AT&T in on nighttime minute participations as a supplement to its weekly 
prestige Telephone Hour. 

The point being advanced: the showcase has a function that it performs well but the 
company can by the minute route do a hard-sell job in behalf of its extension phones, loud- 
speakers and various services. 

Kellogg (Burnett) hasn't shown any signs as yet of taking a serious look at 
ABC TV's offer of the 5:30-6 p.m. action strip for the fall. 

Here's how Burnett puts the situation: we're always interested in looking at network 
availabilities for Kellogg as they arise, since we can get out of spot in a hurry if something 
else look better, but that prospect hasn't occurred so far this season. 

General Mills, which occupied the 5:30-6 strip the past two seasons, has thrown its kid- 
appeal lot almost exclusively with NBC TV come the fall. Rocky and His Friends will 
have a Saturday or Sunday "C" time slot; the same will apply to Pip the Piper, but the Rin 
Tin Tin repeats will be abandoned. 

GM's cereal division will also have riding on NBC TV the new Bullwinkle half-hour 
cartoon, King Leonardo, Saturday afternoon bowling, participation in Game of the Week and 
sundry spots around the World Series. 

The importance of national spot to tv stations keeps increasing for the simple 
reason that their revenue from the networks has been steadily declining for the past 
two or three years. 

Major station operators note that their network income level is certainly not reflecte-1 
in the published network gross billings figures. The totals there go up but network pack- 
ages, discounts and what-not have shrunk the net. 

What tv station operators deem to be a share breakdown of their net revenue: net- 
work, 20%; local, 25%; national spot, 55%. A couple years ago the network share was 
25% and national spot, 50 



24 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



ABC TV last week formally exposed to agencies its latest line of participations: 
the 11:15 p.m. -12:30 a.m. Monday-through-Friday strip composed of tv film re- 
runs, starting the first week in October. The shows will have a host. 

The schedule: Monday, Sugarfoot; Tuesday, Bourbon Street Beat; Wednesday, The 
Alaskans; Thursday, Hong Kong; Friday, Stagecoach West. 

Commercial insertions: there's to be 12 of them in six positions back-to-back. Four 
of the 12 may be sold to affiliates locally. 

Rates: 1 to 51 uses, $8,633 a minute; 52 to 103 uses, $8,033; 104 to 155 uses, $7,433; 
156 or more uses, $6,833 a minute. 

Special discount: if an advertiser uses eight daytime minutes, which entitles him to 
two bonus daytime minutes, and he buys two of these nighttime minutes, the combination 
becomes a 1 2- plan and the price for the plan is $36,816 a week. 

Probably the most curious observer of CBS TV's efforts to put together a day- 
time women's service strip is NBC TV. 

Not long ago NBC TV was experimenting in the same vineyard but found that it couldn't 
produce a satisfactory women's service series for less than $50,000 a week, which the net- 
work deemed far too expensive. 

The weekly budget for game shows runs around $25,000 and, for serials, $20,000. 

Secretly, NBC TV's daytime masterminds hope that the competitor's project turns 
out to be efficient. They, too, would like to get away from the cloying diet of soapers, 
giveaways and film re-runs, the last of which are getting frayed attention. 

Pepperidge Farms, which Campbell Soup recently acquired, is taking its first 
dip in network tv. 

It'll be daytime with an initial expenditure of $100,000. The lineup is very limited. 
All three networks pitched for the business, but NBC TV won out. 

Another NBC TV buy on a limited hookup: Leeming (Esty) in behalf of its Man-i-magic, 
a cuticle softener. Buy involves around $75,000. 

Compared to a year ago, public service specials have been doing better than 
entertainment specials during 1961 in terms of average audiences. 

Public service specials so far this year have averaged 5,722,000 homes, compared 
to 5,514,000 homes for the same period in 1960, while entertainment specials, on the 
average, slipped from 8,995,000 homes to 8,817,000 homes. 

Here's how Nielsen illustrates the trend in specials and public service programs (evening) 
for the January-February period: 

1960 

AVERAGE AUDIENCE 
HOMES 

8,995,000 
5,514,000 
8,407,000 

Note: During the above period this year there were 43 regularly scheduled public 
service shows at night, as compared to 39 in 1960. The average audience this year was 
5,400,000 homes vs. 4.384,000 homes in 1960. In other words, the average audience for 
this type of programing is going up. 

Heinz (Maxon) is taking a searching look at nighttime network tv. 

But the problem is this: if it moves in that direction it'll have to give up a substan- 
tial share of its daytime commitments, which now run around $3 million. 

A way out: digging into its magazine budget, which constitutes a third of the gross. 

Insor • 17 april 1961 25 



TYPE OF 




NO. OF 


AVEF 


SPECIALS 




SHOWS 


% 


Entertainment 




31 


19.9 


Public Service 




15 


12.2 


/Vvg. Eve. Pros 


ram 




18.6 





1961 


NO. OF 


AVERAGE AUDIENCE 


SHOWS 


% 


HOMES 


19 


18.8 


8,817,000 


16 


12.2 


5,722,000 




19.2 


9.005.000 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Remember that new SRA confirmation form that"* supposed to do double serv- 
ice as an insertion order? 

\\ ell, some important spot buying agencies who've adopted the SRA form aren't sending 
duls signed copies of the confirmation back to the agencies but instead are issuing sepa- 
rate insertion orders. 

All of which, as one rep philosophized to SPONSOR-SCOPE, goes to show that the one 
business that can't be regimented or deflected from its old ways is advertising. 

Daytime tv sets-in-use took a hike in January over the like month of 1960. 
Audience composition showed quite a jump in the percentage of men viewers. 

One feasible reason for that latter increase: the employment situation. But there's 
this curious factor: number of persons per set underwent no change whatever. 
Nielsen's national sets-in-use for the two periods: 

TIME ISNUARY1960 JANUARY 1961 

9-10 14.3% 15.9% 

11-12 23.1% 24.1% 

1-2 24.6' 1 20.7 

3-4 23.4% 24.4% 



From present indications spot tv and radio will have a record year from the 
beer industry: the buying this spring, say stations and reps, is heavier than ever. 

Beer trade estimates are that barrelage for the initial 1961 quarter are 3%, at least, over 
last year — and this despite a unusually severe winter. 



Radio sellers, watch for U. S. Tobacco, now at Donahue & Coe, to expand on a 
grand scale its spot campaign for the Encore brand. 

The cigarette has been undergoing an intensive media test in Buffalo and Toledo, 

ssilh three stations used in each market. The schedules have been renewed three times. 

The character of the current tv network selling season is such as to lead to 
more than one significant pattern innovation for nighttime. 

A case in point: letting seasonal advertisers match the extent of their commercial min- 
ute load in alternate half-hours to their sales graph. Under such an arrangement an ad- 
vertiser would be committed for two minutes a week for seven consecutive weeks and a minute] 
a week over the subsequent seven weeks when sales slacken off. 

Agencies report that the disposition among two networks as regards nighttime buyingl 
has taken this tack: let's hear what your problem and plan are and we'll see what we , 
can do. 

Eastman Kodak (JWT) hasn't made a decision yet as to whether it wants to unj 
leash a massive spot campaign for spring and summer — particularly an a reminder^ 
to camera owners to get that camera off the shelf. 

If the warm weather push does get started it will be in May for both tv and radio, witkl 
the emphasis on the former. 

In any event there will be a Kodak spot campaign before Christmas. 

It would all be the climax to a long-time test on how the company can most efTe< iiselsj 
use the spot medium for seasonal promotions. 



26 



For other news coverage in this issue: see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6 
Sponsor-Week, page 29; Sponsor Week Wrap-Up, page 64; Washington Week, page 59 
sponsor Hears, page 62; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 72; and Film-Scope, page 60. 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 196 






\KE A GOOD 
LOOK 



THE NASHVILLE MARKET 



After you've looked at Marilyn King of WSM - TV's If Kings 




TV Homes 



372,800 




fetail Sales — $1,769,149,000.00 




Active Buying Income— $2,458,273,000 



TA -TELEVISION MAGAZINE 




MARKET BOOK-1960 



M^H 



■swe / « s a w 



When Miami mermaids relax, they flip to WFAB Radio, Mutual's newest affiliate. Mutual waited for a 
bright, bubbly new station-and now WFAB (dial 990) offers prestige news plus the world's best music 
in fabulous Miami (cha-cha-cha!). WFAB. like the 400 local stations you get with your Mutual "buy," 
has the Mutual advantage: local programming plus authoritative, listenable Mutual news. Reach below 
the surface for results, You'll find that it pays in depth to schedule MUTUAL RADIO 

"\V T FAB A SERVICE TO INDEPENDENT STATION^ 

• » . • a riTTl?C! Subsidiary of Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company 

EVERYBODY 

IIN 

FABULOUS 

MIAMI! 



^> 



, 









17 April 1961 



Latest tv and 
radio developments of 
the week, briefed 
for busy readers 



SPONSOR-WEEK 



* Burnett tells writers about 'somewhere west of New Jersey' 
^ George Storer, Jr., elected Storer Broadcasting president 
** National campaign for American Petroleum in works at JWT 



IDEAS: FUEL FOR FIRES OF WBC MEET 



(Pittsburgh): Ideas sparkled and raged through the 
four-day public service conclave of the Westinghouse 
Broadcasting Co. last week, alternately inspiring and 
firing the imagination and ire of 400 participants. 

All of the ideas, whether propounded by observers or 
5ome 70 speakers, concerned two key themes of this 
: ourth annual WBC public service conclave: Change and 
Communication. 

Noted speakers from inside and outside the industry 

differed on approaches to both. Many were outspoken 

n their urging of a revolutionary and immediate change 

In air media programing, particularly in tv, rather than 

vhat they see as a lagging, evolutionary progression. 

Sam Levenson, headline speaker at the Tuesday 

ncheon, brought a standing ovation for his deft mix- 

ure of rib-rocking humor with incisive declarations of 

/s moral responsibility as a minute-to-minute factor 

n influencing people's lives. 

He contends television has the responsibility — 

whether it likes it or not"— of helping or hurting; that 

ne public is not a mass but individuals, some "slow" 

nd some "geniuses." But all deserve the chance to 

ecome better people, to live nearer to their potential, 

e said. 

Tv, no more than education, "can teach to them at 
ie level of what they are. Reach them for what they 
light be." 

There seemed to be agreement among all contingents 
ical on the "entertainment" issue that public service 
rogram efforts in air media have been notable, maxi- 
)ized and highly successful in the past couple of years. 
Main conference controversy centered on the role of 
e entertainment program in influencing for bad or 



>o\spi; 



17 APRIL 1961 



good — the minds and spirits and hopes of the people. 

Monday-through-Wednesday sessions blended a mix 
of pure philosophical theory, practical application of 
such theories and the ever-popular "how to" sessions. 
Radio and tv station executives attended seminars de- 
signed for immediate short-range betterment of their 
efforts, but delegates were swept up most of all by the 
flair and the drama of several key, non-industry speak- 
ers. Among them: 

Pierre Salinger, press secretary to the President (see 
Newsmaker of the Week, page 6), asked that the com- 
munications lines not be 
"clogged with trivia." The 
United Nations delegation 
chairman from Nigeria, The 
Hon. Jaja Wachuku (substitut- 
ing for Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, 
who was ill) asked that com- 
munications media be factual, 
insist on "accuracy and bal- 
ance" in reportage. 

Albert McCleery, tv producer, deplored the multiplic- 
ity of "rules and regulations," asked for less second- 
guessing, urged affiliates to "rise — for you have nothing 
to lose but your networks!" 

WBC Pres. Donald McGannon asked for self-determi- 
nation. The choice for individuals and for broadcast- 
ers: "To drift with tides of change; to fall behind them, 
or to try to control and create changes for good ends." 

Henry Schachte, executive v.p. of Lever Bros., appear- 
ing on a jam-packed panel of eight persons, said that 
"program presentation rather than program content" is 
basic issue in continuing debate on tv's function. 



29 




Don McGannon 



MB 



<t£ii 




The Profit Squeeze 

• • • and one good way 

to deal with it 



Seeking a solution to the profit squeeze 
these days, a cold and calculating eye 
is directed at cost — all costs, including 
advertising. 

What should be examined is not only 
costs, but values — short range and long 
range. Not only what you put into a 
project, but what you get out of it. 

Herein lies the difference between 
a cost and an investment. 

Two competitors may invest a simi- 
lar amount in advertising. But one — 
through its agency's application of re- 
search, creative media selection, re- 
sourceful planning and effective selling 
ideas — can give his advertising more 
exposure per dollar, more appeal and 
more conviction. 

Not only will he reach more pros- 
pects, he'll sell more. And that means a 
better return on the advertising invest- 
ment. 

The profit squeeze may have a healthy, 
long-range effect if it induces an ad- 
vertiser to examine his advertising and 
advertising services with a critical eye. 

In a profit squeeze, the job is no' 
only to examine costs. It is also to in 
crease the dollars of return. 

YOUNG & RUBICAM, Advertising 



Sl'ONSOK 



I , VPRIL 1"!' 



17 April 1961/SP0NS0R-WEEK 




Ad agency buys tv commercials to develop 
corporate image for clients, prospects 

Corporate image of an ad agency or a business pitch 
are seldorri developed through advertising yet Arcade 
Advertising Agency of Chattanooga is still picking up 
:lient leads after a mid-March tv self-promotion. 

Gaines P. Campbell, Jr., 
president of the shop which 
bills $1 million-plus annually, 
took to the local air on WTVC- 
TV with seven commercials 
plugging his agency. 

t Campbell says more than 

100 phone calls came in the 
i^^^H following day, many from re- 

G. P. Campbell, Jr. taj|ers and other prospect j ve 

:lients. The idea of show-casing the agency "has 
jroved to be of a much broader-scope public relations 
effort than we anticipated," and may be repeated. 

Copy in commercials covered these phases: What is 
in advertising agency, The Arcade personnel, The 
ilanned board methods of developing plans for a cli- 
;nt, Arcade clients and products, Breakdown of tech- 
lique in producing a tv commercial, Typical day in an 
igency, The corporate image. 

Arcade maintains a branch in Sarasota, where bill- 
ngs approximate $150,000. Twelve employees at head- 
uarters service the accounts, with 21% of the billings 
oing to tv and radio. 




TEST SET FOR WBCS LATE-NICHTER 

First move of a major station group to Venture into 
yndicated programing will be tested in Boston 22 May 
s the Westinghouse Broadcasting Co.'s new 90-minute 
ite-night variety feature takes the air for two weeks. 
■ Slotted as competition to NBC TV's Jack Paar show, 
'oe new "PM East and PM West" — a combo East- and 
/est-coast offering — is slated to go on all WBC stations 
s a five-a-week feature and into national syndication 
June. 

i The Boston test on WBZ-TV presumably will cover all 
hases of consumer tune-in, reaction and composition 
s well as sponsor reaction. 

It's billed as a "controversial, high-grade, intelligent 
ntertainment" segment which — unlike the Paar compe- 
tion— will be tightly controlled, organized and blue- 
rinted in advance. 

WBC programers contend such a show will fill a cur- 
;nt vacuum in the late-night hours. Their thinking: 
mature films have passed their peak, with audiences in- 
sting now on top stars with name value, a diminution 
: available product and a resultant depression of fea- 
ire film ratings all over the country. 



BURNETT TAKES COPYWRITERS ON 
TOUR WEST OF NEW JERSEY' 

Leo Burnett, in New York last week to assume a 
stance in the Copywriters Hall of Fame at the first an- 
nual awards dinner to the Advertising Writers Club, had 
an above-par assortment of witicisms and counsel. In 
a speech titled "Somewhere west of New Jersey," he de- 
tailed some Chicago views. 

On his agency's Creative Review Committee: "It's an 
extrusion die that tries to give the agency's work the 
shape of quality." Then, writers' ideas with "bite and 
abrasiveness reshape our dies." 

On ideas: "It's not enough for us to find a good idea 
and execute it well; we also have to like it." 

On Rosser Reeves' (Ted Bates) contention that orig- 
inality is the most dangerous word in advertising: "It 
takes a very original man to make a remark like that. 
(It's) sort of like Westinghouse with the theme 'Progress 
is our most unimportant product.'" 

"That agency, which seems to be identifying itself as 
the apostle of originality (you don't suppose THEY'RE 
the people who sold that approach to the tv networks 
as a PROGRAMING idea, do you?) said it had 700 peo- 
ple working to keep the client from changing an ad 
that had run 11 years. We've got 700 people working 
like crazy to make NEW ads and commercials. 

On writing rules: "abide by the principles of all lit- 
erary efforts: simplicity, clarity, creditability, relevant 
interest, freshness, distinction. Select devices to achieve 
your ends. Make the most of the special advantages of 
the medium used. Take the trouble to do it well. 



STORER, JR., ELECTED PRESIDENT 

(Miami): George B. Storer, Jr., last week became presi- 
dent of Storer Broadcasting Co., a 12-station group 
which reported a 1960 net income of $1 million. 

The 36-year-old son of Board Chairman George Storer, 
Sr., has most recently served the company as vice presi- 
dent for television, a post now being divided between 
two regional vice presidents: Bill Michaels in Detroit 
(WJBK AM-TV) and Terry H. Lee in Atlanta (WAGA-TV). 

The new president has worked in broadcast since 
1948 in a variety of capacities. 



Pittsburgh Class mulls agency choice 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass last week held the final screen- 
ing for agencies pitching the $3.5-million account. 
There should be decision on the selectee within the 
next two weeks. 

Among those invited for the finals was BBDO, which 
currently administers the account. One of the criteria 
set up: that agency have a Pittsburgh office. 



"ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



31 



KETV... Bubbling 




with Biggest Audience in Omaha Marke 



FIRST 

SETS IN USE 

KETV is the leading station in 
Omaha from 9:00 a.m. to mid- 
night — and from 6:00 p.m. to 
midnight — every night of 
the week: 

6 p.m. to Midnight 
KETV 39.5 

Station Y 29.8 
Station Z 30.8 



I 



FIRST 

IN HOMES DELIVERED 

More people in Nebraska 
and Iowa watch KETV from 

6:00 p.m. to midnight 
— every night of the week: 

KETV 44,600 homes 

Station Y 37,400 homes 
Station Z 41,500 homes 



FIRST 

IN MOVIES 

KETV is the movie 

station in Omaha for 

the 15th consecutive 

rating period. KETV's 

Movie Masterpiece 

has 75% of the 

nighttime movie 





1 



FIRST 

IN TOP 
NETWORK SHOWS 

KETV has 3 out of the top 5 network 

shows in Omaha: 

The Untouchables KETV 43.3 

Gunsmoke 41.5 

Lawrence Welk KETV 41.0 

Candid Camera 41.0 

My Three Sons KETV 39.5 



omaha 
is 



OMAHA WORLD-HERALD STATION 

ABC TELEVISION NETWORK 



32 



SI'ONSOU 



17 APRIL 196 



WHALEN TO BLAIR RADIO AS 
BARBORKA STARTS OWN FIRM 

Clifford Barborka, Jr., who left his post a fortnight ago 
as John Blair Co. v. p. in charge of market and creative 
services, is being replaced by Jay" Whalen, account ex- 
ecutive at the Katz Agency representation firm. 

Whalen starts today (17) as a sales executive in the 
3lair Group sales department, said Arthur McCoy, v.p. 
and sales manager. He's worked previously at Venard, 
Rintoul & McConnell and nine years ago was a member 
)f the sales development department of Blair-Tv. 

Barborka, whose new radio project was announced 
n SPONSOR last week, is president of the newly formed 
tetter Broadcast Bureau, an organization which will 
■erve clients with creative business services but func- 
ion also as a quasi-trade group. 

Barborka is lining up key principals from various as- 
sets of the broadcast and advertising industries and is 
xpected to make details of the association known dur- 
ng the National Assn. of Broadcasters' convention in 
Washington 7-10 May. 

The company will specialize in various radio services 
-creative, media and sales — for subscribing clients, 
ie bulk of which will be radio stations and advertising 
gencies. 



500,000 N. Y. air buy sets pace 
nd style for Dubonnet drive 

In wine sales, as New York goes, so goes the na- 
on!" This is the contention of the Schenley Import 
o., New York, which is spending half of a. $1 million 
jdget to sell Dubonnet wine in that city and — it hopes 
to set a national marketing and consumption pattern. 
This is four times the amount spent in the market 
eviously. It's been allocated to reach a pilot group 

pace-setters — society people, business executives, 
reer women and housewives. 

The $500,000 air effort includes a weekly half-hour 
nulcast of syndicated (NTA) Montevani show for 39 
yeks on WNTA AM-TV (also FM); 10- 20- and 60-second 
nnouncements on two tv stations; 20-, 30- and 60-sec- 
<id commercials on five radio stations, all through 
leppner agency, New York. 



atz will rep 2 more NBC stations 

Swing-shift of network-represented, non o&o stations 
tntinued last week as The Katz Agency picked up two 
Icilities currently represented by NBC Spot Sales. 

They are KSD AM and TV, St. Louis, with the transfer 
eective 1 July. The previous week two others signing 
;-angements with Katz were WAVE AM and TV, Louis- 
\le. 



17 April 1961 SPONSOR-WEEK 

Mennen pulls men's items out of spot 
to hit hard on net radio and specials 

Mennen, through Warwick & Legler, is pulling back on 
spot radio temporarily although the entire budget for 
the men's line is still in radio. 

Agency is matching media and markets, checking 
sales territories on the basis of Nielsen Drug Index re- 
ports and generally re-appraising the network-spot radio 
impact, where the weight is and should be. 

Cancellation of an estimated 80% of its spot radio 
budget which has gone to a package buy of the Blair 
Group Plan is termed by an agency spokesman a "tem- 
porary pullback." Pattern in the past year has been to 
heavy-up with net shows on ABC, CBS and MBS in com- 
bination with the spot flight effort. 

Mennen is thinking of buying more such radio spe- 
cials as the Johannson-Patterson fight (which it spon- 
sored on ABC). Plan, however, is to keep total budget 
in radio and to push hardest on two men's products, the 
Skin Bracer and the spray deodorant. 



R. J. REYNOLDS BOOSTS TV 

Latest in the seasonal swoop of annual reports comes 
from R. J. Reynolds and Board Chairman Bowman Gray. 

Commenting that ad budgets in '60 were higher than 
in '59 largely because of "greater media charges," he 
noted ad costs as percentage of sales were down. He 
said "it is essential we use media that reach the great- 
est number of potential buyers in the most effective 
ways. 

"We regard tv as a particularly effective medium be- 
cause it not only reaches a vast audience but also is 
unique in affording personal salesmanship." He expects 
this year's ad investment to be higher. 



^ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



AMERICAN PETROLEUM TO SEE 
NEW MEDIA PLANS THIS MONTH 

American Petroleum Institute, New York, late this 
month will consider media recommendations from J. 
Walter Thompson for a projected institutional advertis- 
ing program. 

This year's activity is expected to be limited to a few 
test market areas, themed to increased usage of auto- 
mobiles and therefore of gasoline and motor oil. Ac- 
tual ad program will be administered by a committee 
of petroleum company ad managers under the over-all 
supervision of James Bennett at API and of Chet Hop- 
kins at JWT. 

More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 64 



y y_\* 



Spring — and Florence — 



have arrived. 



The climate's right for Florence, 
symbol of the new South. 
Industrial plants bloom and agriculture thrives 
this unique area, where our tv signal 
blossoms in the nation's fifth largest 
single-station market — without 
significant outside distraction. 



, 



^WBTW 

Florence, South Carolina 



. 



Channel 8 • Maximum power • Maximum vat 
Represented nationally by CBS TV Spot Sales 



A Jefferson Standard Station affiliated with 
WBT and WBTV, Charlotte. 




SPONSOR 

17 APRIL 1961 



Media salary range at top agencies 



JOB TITLE 


RANGE 


AVERAGE 


V.P. FOR MEDIA 


S.;<UH)()-S<>( ).()()() 


$35,000 


MEDIA DIRECTOR 


$20,000-128,000 


$25,000 


ASSOC. MEDIA DIRECTOR 


$15,000-$25,000 


$18,000 


ASST. MEDIA DIRECTOR 


$15,000-118,000 


$15,000 


CHIEF TIMEBUYER 


$12,000-$18,000 


$12,000 


TIMEBUYER 


$6,000-$15,000 


$8,500 


ASSISTANT BUYER 


$5,000-$10,000 


$6,400 


ESTIMATOR 


$3,600- $7,500 


$5,000 


SECRETARY 


$4,000- $5,200 


$4,200 


CLERICAL 


$2,800- $4,000 


$3,800 



This survey of media department salaries includes the range (wide in all cases) for most 
jobs as well as the figure which appears to be the most usual at major agencies. Me- 
dia people feel that with increased planning responsibilities, they should get more. 



MEDIA: STILL THE AGENCY STEPCHILD? 

Although its value, importance have increased tremendously, 
equality in salaries, status is still lacking, many admen feel 



I here's been a terrific amount 
if television and radio buying in the 
jast month," said a former media di- 
ector last week, "and I'm glad I had 
iiothing to do with it." Now in ac- 
count work at the same agency, he 
dded, "I never knew how underpaid 
ve'd been until I left media and real- 
zed what I could make here, and for 
low much work." 



This comment was but one indica- 
tion of the growing restlessness in 
media departments, and the growing 
seriousness of a situation which sees 
great changes in the function and val- 
ue of the media department without 
a complementary growth in its status 
in the minds of agency management. 

Agency clients today expect media 
departments to be expert in planning, 



-PONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



as well as in implementing and record 
keeping. And they demand, as Rich- 
ard Paige, media manager for Col- 
gate's household products, told spon- 
sor, "top media thinkers and strate- 
gists . . . with many talents, a lot of 
special knowledge and considerable 
foresight." 

And yet, many media people feel, 
they are still being paid and thought 



35 



"Media has emerged from clerkship to virtual 
equality in the stewardship of the agency" 



of despite all evidence — as clerks. 
The media Function has grown and 
matured in the la>i five years, sev- 
eral media directors declared last 
week, to a point where media should 
no longer be the stepchild of the 
agencj when ii comes to wages, prop- 
el personnel and recognition. Most 

creative departments gel four to five 
times as much mone\ with which to 
operate, the) noted, and most ac- 
counl groups about the same. And 
\el media usuall) employs the most 
people, often 20' i of the entire agen- 
C) personnel. Even when research is 
included in media's totals, the budget 
ratio is little changed. 

But media, the) maintained, has 
emerged from its clerkship to a posi- 



tion ol \ irtual equality in the steward- 
ship of the agency. I nfortunately, it 
is said, the hangover from earlier 
days is still with agenc) management. 
who tend to think of media as the 
boys in the back room, good hard- 
workers hut not the personalities and 
the "movers" in this business. 

"Even at the top media shops," 
said the former media director who 
had worked at one, "where the de- 
partment's function is recognized in 
its modern sense, you have to get to 
the very top to be in on the good 
money. Unfortunately. I doubt that 
there are three agencies that really 
think media departments are on a 
par in importance with the 'glamor' 
departments." 



An active media director concurred 
in this view, and pointed out that 
"the people who run agencies and , 
their clients can see the results of the 
labors of copywriters, artists and tv 
production. They can't see the re- 
sults of hours of overtime in the me- 
dia department, or even the years of 
learning to be creative buyers — and I 
maintain that media people, to be 
good, must be as creative as artists or 
copywriters. 

"The day of the media guy who 
merely buys out of the books and off 
the rate cards is over," he continued. 
"The value of a media buyer who, 
after long experience, has knowledge 
of the qualitative factors involved in 
a campaign or a buy is worth more 
than his compensation. Management, 
I think, still thinks of us as dull gray 
people, away from the clients, shuf- 
fling numbers and picking up trinkets 
from station representatives." 




1 



An agency consultant suggests 

These are 'considered' ratios which reflect actual 



Function 



Under 
$500,000 







m 


Contact & Planning 


13.00 




New Business 


3.00 




Creative (Copy, Art) 


17.00 




Media 


3.50 




Research 


1.50 




Mechanical Prod. 


5.00 




Radio & TV Prod. 


1.50 




Accounting 


5.00 




General and Adtnln. 


9.00 




Publicity and P.R. 


1.00 


- 



TOTALS 



59.50 



THE IDEAL salary ratios, drawn up by the agency consul- 
tant firm of Ira Rubel (left), are the Chicago accountant's 
scale of what must be achieved in order for an agency 



1 



36 



SPONSOR • 17 APRIL 1961 



The reaction to these comments, by 
agency treasurers, controllers, and 
hose normally defined as "manage- 
ment," indicated that there is some 
iwareness of the new role of media, 
put many traditional arguments 
igainst change still carry weight. 
Vgreement with the pro-media posi- 
ion was generally expressed on these 
natters: 

• Media is called upon in planning 
low, and often attends client confer- 
ences to explain the agency's posi- 
ion in certain areas. 

• Media people should get over 
his "left behind" idea. Their sala- 
ries are improving; agencies try to 
taff their media departments with 
ood people, because they are very 
onscious of the necessity of coming 
p with "damn well documented evi- 
ence." More and more, agencies are 
ecoming horizontal, not vertical, 
ind they realize that buyers are no 



longer clerks to check on things for 
the account group. 

• The eventual upgrading of me- 
dia's status can be attributed to the 
advent of television. The media busi- 
ness is getting much more complex; 
there are many more ways of spend- 
ing money in media — a great many 
more than there were five years ago. 

But most management spokesmen 
were a little chafed by what one called 
"the oft-repeated complaints." Rep- 
resentative opinions: 

People in media do feel that they're 
underpaid and underprivileged in 
many instances. There are several 
reasons. They react to the fact that 
one of the few places agencies can 
put trainees is in their department. 

"These people," said the treasurer 
of one of the top five billing agen- 
cies, "are fresh out of college, and 
frankly they don't know anything 
about the business. 



"In the media department we can 
test them out in the back room, not 
in front of the client. Media people 
resent the fact that we dip into this 
group of trainees in their department 
to provide junior account executives." 

Those who continue in media get 
the feeling, often, that their jobs are 
not as glamorous as the account and 
creative people. There is often an at- 
titude among media people that they 
have been 'left behind.' "Now, listen, 
there are some very good media men 
who can't take the day-to-day trou- 
bles of being account men." 

Another representative of manage- 
ment maintained that media was paid 
"what the market will bear." If they 
hit the top in media, they are paid 
very well. The media director's pay 
scale is about on a par with the ac- 
count executive; the account super- 
visor will make more. "I think that 
the media director's scale will be in- 



I 



ideal' ratios of salary costs to the agency's gross income 

perating conditions. They should provide for adequate profits for a well-managed advertising agency 

$.5-1 
nillion 



$1-2 


$2-5 


$5-10 


$10-25 


Over $25 


million 


million 


million 


million 


million 



14.00 


15.00 


16.00 


16.50 


17.00 


17.00 


3.00 


1.00 


3.00 


2.00 


1.25 


1.25 


17.00 


16.00 


16.00 


16.00 


16.00 


16.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.50 


3.50 


4.00 


4.25 



1.50 


1.50 


1.50 


1.75 


2.00 


2.50 


4.00 


3.75 


3.50 


3.50 


2.50 


2.00 



1.50 



1.50 



2.25 



3.00 



4.25 



4.00 



3.50 



3.00 



3.00 



3.00 



2.50 



- 



9.00 
1.50 



9.00 



8.75 



8.50 



8.00 



7.50 



1.75 



1.50 



1.50 



1.50 



2.00 



8.50 



59.00 



58.50 



58.50 



58.25 



59.25 



make a profit of about 2V2% of billing before profit sharing and taxes. Each agency will, however, adjust 
thin the total percentage so that there are virtually no agencies that spend exactly the percentage set out in every 
itegory. Gross income in the chart refers to commissions, service charges and fees. Media gets from three to 4.25% 



,'ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



37 






creasing in the next few years, 
though." 

Vgencies are "f the opinion thai 
tlir account executive's job is "more 
wearing," and lia~ "less securit) " and 
"less tenure." \nd to quote one 
spokesman, "Remember, too, that 
mam guys are much happier in the 
media department Thej make prettj 
damn good mone) as against what 
they'd make iii manufacturing or ac- 
counting or in some other fields. 1 

SPONSOR showed agenc) and media 

people the recently-prepared "Ratios 

of Salary Costs to ("moss Income" 
(see chart), released to the magazine 
l>\ Ira Rube! & Co., a Chicago ac- 
counting firm which has become one 
of the leading agency consultant-. 
The "considered ratios'" reflect actual 
operating conditions and provide for 
"adequate profits for a well-managed 
agency" (2.59$ of billing before prof- 
it sharing and taxes). 

Vgenc) spokesmen found the fig- 
ures "quite representative of what 
we're trying to do," as one put it*. 
They noted that the 4A's figures of 
a few years ago. which broke down 
the budget by department, were con- 
fusing because of the tremendous 
amount of difference in the way 
agencies, who contributed to the 
stud\. were set up. The 4A's, they 
noted, had to go for an average: 
these new figures b\ the Rubel firm 
break things down more thoroughly 
and are an easier check-list. 

"There will always be discrepan- 
cies," said one agency treasurer. "For 
example, one agency may reach $25 
million with one or two big accounts; 
another may reach it with 20 small 
ones. Some may buy a lot of re- 
search : others do it themselves. The 
same with programing. The costs 
then go under different departments." 

Media people were not as pleased 
with the figures. They felt that with 
the largest number of employees of 
an\ department, in normal cases, they 
should be allotted more than the three 
to 1.2V, as compared to the account 
groups' 13-179? and the (native de- 
partment's 16-17%. 

The problem, they declared almost 
as one, is recognition and how to 
achieve it. One veteran timebuyer 
charged that the pa) is loo low be- 
cause media people have not created 
(Please turn to pape 54) 



38 






MUTUAL AND 3M: 
12 MONTHS LATER 

^ Although sales are up, Mutual's heen concentrating 
on plowing profits into projects to build 'prestige image' 



^ MBS boasts expanded 
staffs, larger station lineups, 



J ust a year ago the Mutual Broad- 
casting System was bought outright 
b\ Minnesota Mining & Manufactur- 
ing Corp. Although 3M's entrance 
into broadcasting was big news, the 
sale of Mutual wasn't. This was the 
fourth time in as many years that 
the network had changed ownership. 

The impact of this news can now 
be felt. For. one year later, Mutual 
has emerged with a sense of stability 
that it had been lacking for many 
years. 

And, it looks like industry specu- 
lations that at least one of the four 
radio networks would fold, with Mu- 
tual the logical "first to go," have 
been tucked away. 

The purchase was announced April 
18, 1960. 

The first year of 3M ownership of 
Mutual has been characterized by an 
image-building campaign. Although 
business has been up (Mutual's gross 



news, public affairs, >ales 
one year after 3M purchase 



., 



has risen M)' , over the pre-3M pe 
od) and sales staffs have been ex- 
panded, the stress at MBS has beeit 
toward building the network's pres-i 
tige. 

All monies made this past \etm 
"have been plowed back into the op- 
eration" said president Robeit F. 
Hurleigh. "You can't make the 
proper return until you have tin- 
proper product," he said. 

During the past year Mutual has 
been hovering around the break-even 
point, with the exception of a few 
months when the network was in tin 
red. 

Here are some highlights of Mu- 
tual's progress under 3M ownership: 

• The hiring of Broadca-t linn 
Sales as a rep. giving Mutual its lai. 
est sales coverage area to date and | 
marking the first time a network has 
hired a sales representative. 

• An increase in its regular sale* 



For the first time Mutual has coverage 
in all of Nielsen's "A" market counties 



% U.S. 



County size 


radio homes 


% MBS audience 


Over 500,000 


37.1% 


39.0% 


100,000-500.000 


27.0 r ; 


26.5% 


50.000-100.000 


19.5% 


28.1% 



Under 50.000 



15.8% 



6.1% 



Nielsen Radio Index, Novembei December 1960 — An avcrace of all commercial sccc 

iii four networks. The Four categories under County size represent in order 
to bottom, Nlel en's \. B, e. and n Counties. 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 196 




r SMILING PRESIDENTS — Herbert P. Buetow, head of Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing and chairman of MBS, and Robert F. Hur- 
;igh, Mutual Broadcasting System president. The network has had "its greatest sense of stability" since 3M purchased it outright one year ago 



orce from seven to 11. 

• An addition of top-flight names 
uch as Arlene Francis, Tony Marvin 
nd Leo Durocher to its roster of 
ews personalities. 

A wooing back of many top ad- 
ertisers, such as General Mills and 
General Foods. 

• The opening of full-time news 
ureaus in San Francisco and Bos- 
>n. 

When 3M bought Mutual the net- 
ork had just come out of bank- 
jptcy following a financial reorgan- 
:ation under Chapter 11 of the 
ankruptcy Act. 

The network has had a stormy 
nancial history for the past five 
/:ars. But it managed to clear its 
nancial standing during the time 
(hen, with Hurleigh as president, 
ad financiers Albert McCarthy and 
hester Ferguson as owners, the 
ankruptcy proceedings were under- 
sell and concluded. 

What about 3M's influence on the 

twork? Although Mutual is left 
pretty much on its own" all of the 

>ard members, with the exception 
Hurleigh, are 3M executives. 

According to Hurleigh the network 
aerates on its own and gets no fi- 
mcial assistance from 3M. "How- 



ever, if the situation ever arose we 
could probably call on the parent 
company for funds," he said. 

Mutuals programing consists of 
the following: 

• Thirty-six five-minute newscasts 
fed daily. 

• A 25-minute special news pro- 
gram, once a week on Monday night, 
called The World Today. 

• Game of the Day weekend sports 
programs (two-hours Saturday and 
Sunday) . 

• Music Beyond the Stars and 
America's Favorite Tunes, music fill- 
ins fed all day. 

The two music shows are prepared 
in 25-minute taped segments by Mu- 
tual. They are designed so that the 
local station may cut in for 90 sec- 
onds during each 25-minute segment 
without disturbing the continuity. In 
other words, the stations are told that 
at a certain time a standard tune 
which may be cut out of the pro- 
gram will be played for 90 seconds. 
In its place may be inserted com- 
mercials, public affairs announce- 
ments or the like. 

Mutual operates on a swap-time ar- 
rangement. That is. the network 
takes air time from affiliates rather 
than money for programing. The 



network pays all line charges except 
in the cases of non-metropolitan sta- 
tions which pay pro rata fees for line 
costs. 

Mutuals annual line charges run 
between $2-2.5 million dollars. 

Since 3M took over, it has been 
Mutuals plan to build up its news 
strength. Added to MBS' roster of 
commentators during the past year 
have been Arlene Francis, for wom- 
en's news, Whitney Bolton, the net- 
work's drama critic; Tony Marvin, 
newscasts; Van Patrick, sports di- 
rector; Leo Durocher, sports news, 
and George Hamilton Combs, news- 
casts. Financial commentator Frank 
Singiser now does two newscasts 
daily. 

Among the network's major objec- 
tives since 3M ownership has been 
expansion of special public affairs 
coverage, such as the national con- 
ventions and election, the Eichmann 
trial and the Project Mercury astro- 
naut project. 

The nature of Mutual's coverage 
has changed. In a recent memo to 
his sales staff, vice president in 
charge of sales Irv Lichtenstein 
proudly announced that "Mutual is 
no longer 'king' of the 'B' and 'C 
markets, but is on top of the 'A' and 



•ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



39 










THE NETWORK'S greatest emphasis during the past year has been on news and special news 
coverage. Here, president Bob Hurleigh briefs members of his staff at convention headquarters 
last summer. Newsmen are (I to r): Cedric Foster, Norman Baer, Joe Keating, Hal Gold 



'B' markets. 

"For a longer period than we care 
to remember, the Mutual Radio sales 
story has been that we cover the 'B 
and *C county areas better than any 
other network." he said. '"We for- 
feited the 21 largest metropolitan 
areas — the 'A' counties — to NBC and 
CBS but this is no longer true." said 
Lichtenstein. 

He referred his staff to the Niel- 
sen's Radio Index I November-De- 
cember l')(i()i which analyzes net- 
work radio audiences by market divi- 
sions (see accompanying chart for 
Mutual's breakdown i . 

This is the way Mutual's station 
compensation plan works, and how 
it differs from the other webs. I n- 
dei Mutual s old plan, if a station's 
hourlv rate was $100, it would be 
entitled to this sum. less discount 
(ranging from 74-769? ' ,mni tne 
network. Tluis. the station would 
get around $25 for carrying an hour 
network show. 

I rider Mutual's present s\ stein, the 
station ran sell a hall hour and the 
network ran ~<f I a half hour. Thus 
the station gets the value of half an 
hour of it- air time i in this case $50 i 
and the network net- the value of it- 
air-time for a half-hour. 

Mutual also has vigorously ex- 
panded it- Bales operation in the lasl 
\ear. There are now 1 1 full-time 

salesmen, new offices in Chicago, and 



an agreement with Broadcast Time 
Sales, all of which gives the network 
-e\en sales outposts. 

Among the advertisers which are 
new to Mutual or which returned to 
the network after several years' hi- 
atus were Church & Dwight. F&F 
Labs. R. T. French. General Mills. 
General Foods, H. D. Lee, Mennen, 
Scott Paper, and Norwich Pharmacal. 

Mutual also has orders from most 
of the top agencies. Among these are 
N. W. Aver. J. Walter Thompson, 
BBDO, Leo Burnett. Warwick & Leg- 
ler, Knox-Reeves. Grey, MacManus. 
John & Adams, Keyes, Madden & 
Jones, Benton & Bowles, Gever, Mor- 
ev. Madden & Ballard, and Cunning- 
ham Jv Walsh. 

The network has also built up its 
lineup of stations during the past 
year. Affiliates number 421. Al- 
though it lost 42 stations from the 
Inter-mountain network (now taking 
service from ARC I. Mutual is now 
direct!) affiliating with many stations 
in Intei -mountain's area. 

In June of I960 MRS instituted a 
network editorial service. Two edi- 
torials a da\ are aired b) president 
Hurleigh. The subjects are voted 
upon h\ a three-man hoard consist- 
ing ol new- director Norman Baer. 
Steve McCormick, and Hurleigh. To 
date there are 363 stations which air 
at least one editorial a day, and 27(1 
which air both. ^ 



NORELCO 



^ Through ad manage! 
Harry Fry, Noreleo has ex* 
perimented with all kinds of 
tv fare, network and spot 



I en years ago. when you thought 
of an electric shaver, vou thought oil 
a Remington. Schick or Sunbeam. I 
But. today, the name Norelco pops 
up as frequently, or, in some mar- I 
kets, more often, than the other ' 
giants of the electric shaver industry I 

In the midst of Norelco's dynamii 
rise, and its current switch to spot tv j 
is Harry Fry. advertising-puhlicitv j 
manager for North American Philip: j 
Co., and a man with a flair for un 
usual tv buying combined with i 
down-to-earth personality. 

Since 1955, when Norelco gol it 
feet wet in tv with a small rejziona i 
sponsorship of Touchdown. Norelco 1 
name has been exposed via a varid 
of tv fare: quiz shows, public affaii 
programs, newscasts, adventur 
shows, sporting events, and variet 
shows. 

"Harry is willing to experimen 
with sound, well-proven, though un 
orthodox ideas, and he is responsibl 
for much of Norelco's succes- I" 
cause of this," one of his colleagw 
told SPONSOR. 

The history of his network hu\ 
for Norelco seems to indicate tli; 
he has a sixth sense when it comes t 
tv. 

For example, he took a <l 
with the Jack Paar Show when it i 
placed the old Tonight Show, en 
though Tonight had flopped in tli. j 
time period. 

He also took a chance on Huntk 
Brinkley News, even though at tl 
outset of the program Dougli 
wards had the top news show . I 
felt that H-B"s new approach won 
develop them into a top pn 
And. he had Steve Allen, whosi 
he also sponsored, deliver lh< 

mercials on Huntley-Brinkley. 

This spring and next fall Norel 
will be using spot tv exclusive!) 
I 50 markets. Fry's buying is bei 



40 



sl'MNSOl! 



17 APRI1 1" 



TV BUYS TAKE OFF-BEAT TACK 



concentrated mainly on weekends. 

This plan is an offshoot of an ex- 
periment Fry made late in 1959. He 
realized that one of the biggest weeks 
of the year is the week after Christ- 
imas, because of gift returns and ex- 
changes. That year, he bought heav- 
ily into 75 markets, using two sta- 
tions in each market, for the week- 
end immediately following Christ- 
mas. The results were "nothing short 
t )f great" and he's been using this 
echnique ever since. 

Among Norelco's other network tv 
ihows were Walter Winchell File, a 
'pioneership" on NBC's Project 20 
n 1956, NBC's Journey To Under- 
handing, $64,000 Question, and some 
[;pot carriers on ABC TV and CBS 

rv. 

Norelco's agency is C. J. LaRoche. 
Harry Fry joined North American 
J hilips in 1943 "because it offered 
i unique opportunity." The corpora- 
ion was started in 1942 and needed 
omeone to come in and shape things, 
t had a number of divisions with 
arying requirements and its plan- 
ners wanted to set up a "creative 
ervice center." 

Fry came in as head of this small 
ireative group. Its objectives: to be 
\ focal point for the advertising-pub- 
city needs of the individual divi- 
ions. 

The company's policy calls for a 
ommercial manager of each division 
ho is responsible for making profits 
ir his division. Should he feel his 
ivision needs advertising and pro- 
motion, Harry Fry and his depart- 
lent go to work. There are about 
p people in Fry's staff. 
Among North American Philips 
roducts are radios, telecommunica- 
ons, radio-phonographs, 35/70 mm. 
niversal motion picture projectors, 
lay apparatus, tape recorders, 
leakers, dictating machines, electron 
bes and devices, and, of course, 
en's and women's electric shavers. 
Fry concentrates heavily in the 
laver division because that division 
J eds more of his services. 
The shaver has been on the mar- 
:t since 1948. The women's models 
ined the fold in 1950. Distribution 



and sales have been gradually devel- 
oped. "It's an odd business, selling 
something to get rid of something 
nobody wants — namely whiskers," 
said Fry. "For several years people 
didn't even know of our existence," 
he said. 

The first advertising for Norelco 
was run in Newark, N. J., newspa- 
pers. "In the beginning we were ex- 
ceedingly humble," he said. "All we 



wanted to do was to sell a liitle bit. 
After a while we were helped by the 
product itself, and a great di-al of 
most-welcome word-of-mouth adver- 
tising." 

Although Norelco is a fairly exten- 
sive newspaper and magazine user, 
Fry believes tv is a natural for his 
product "because of its demonstra- 
tion qualities." About his commer- 
I Please turn to page 5 I l 



Harry Fry has seen Norelco through 

six years of diversified network schedules, 

has now switched all efforts to spot 




'ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



BASEBALL'S FAITHFUL VIEWER 



^ Hot trains get best ratings, but lesser performers 
pile up quite respectable figures in their tv outings 

^ Cellar-dwelling Phillies and fourth-place Cleveland 
register improved ratings in 1960 over previous season 



day games, an area which has shown 
some decline throughout the leagues, 
was off slightly in Cleveland, from 21 
in '59 to 20 last year for the games 
tahulated. 

In terms of performance on the 
field, the Philadelphia Phillies have 
shown a strong preference for the 
league cellar of late, yet its tv ratings 
performance is quite respectahle. 
Based on availahle ARB research the 
Phillies moved up from a 20 year 
hefore last to 23 for the 60 season, 
for night games. The team's weekend 
day game ratings, however, were off 
six percentage points over this peri- 
od, from 24 to 19. 

The St. Louis Cardinals scored 
mightily in the nighttime ratings con- 
test, hiking their '59 figure of 13 to 
22 for last season. Some of the 



credit must of course go to the club's 



Ionic rung are great, hut base hits 
arc the backbone of the national pas- 
time. 

When it comes to baseball as a tv 
l>u\. you've clouted a homer if you 
latcb on to a perennial second divi- 
sion cluh during its first pennant 
drive in decades. Or if you sponsor 
the telecasts of a relative!) new team 
in strong contention for the flag all 
season, there again, it's out of the 
ballpark for a circuit smash. But 
there are base hits to he had outside 
the rarified atmosphere surrounding 
last season's Pirates and Orioles. 

Take the Cleveland Indians. ARB 
night game figures indicate that 
average quarter-hour viewership was 
up from 2J! in 1959 to 29 the follow- 
ing season though the team fared bet- 
ter in '59. The rating for weekend 



considerably improved play in I960. 
But even the peppered up Cardinals 
were susceptible to the general drop- 
off in weekend day game viewership! 
their score in that area fell from 19 
to 16 over the period. 

There were teams apparently im- 
mune to week-end dolldrums, \I!H 
reports indicate. The Washout I 
Senators actually demonstrated an 
appreciable rise, from 15 to 19 n\er 
the period. The New York Yankees 
were up slightly, while the Chicago 
White Sox held the line, as did Haiti- 
more's Orioles. 

Ratings for the Oriole telecasts in 
1960 averaged 33 per quarter limn. 
including weekend daytime games. 
according to WJZ-TV which airs tin 
games. This compares with 30 fm 
the previous season, the figures ema- 
nating from ARB. The share-of-audi- 
ence figures for '60, weekends in- 
cluded, is placed at 69%. The sta- 
tion reports that these telecasts 
reached more audience than any local 
or network program with the excep-l 
tion of Gunsmoke. Only world cham- 
pion Pittsburgh may have bettered 






Several teams bettered their tv performance last season 




Baltimore Orlolei 



12 



REACHING for a tough one is agile Oriole infielde 
Brooks Robinson. His team did some fancy reachin 
of Baltimore audiences via WJZ-TV last season, notchin 
a 33 average per quarter hour, including weekend da 
games for which ratings are generally down. And th 
ARB ratings were not based on contests with the Yankee 
or White Sox with whom Baltimore battled for the Amer 
can League Flag. Only "Gunsmoke," among all of th 
programing on the air in Baltimore fared better, accorc 
ing to the station. 

Teams with less stimulating field performances tha 
the Orioles and Pirates (the latter probably edged oi 
Baltimore in ratings), turned in quite satisfactory rating 
as well. For night games, Cleveland hit 29; Philadelphi 
23; St. Louis, 22— all improvements over the '59 recor 



sroNsiin 



17 APRIl I" 1 



this score in the world of televised 
baseball. 

In assessing the Orioles' tv audi- 
ence performance for 1900, WJZ-TV 
officials emphasize that none of the 
ARB-rated games involved the Yan- 
kees or White Sox with whom the 
Baltimore squad was engaged in a 
three-way battle for the American 
League flag. Seven of the 11 rated 
games reportedly were with second- 
division teams, while in the remainder 
the Orioles took on fourth-place 
[Cleveland. 

One Oriole official had this to say: 
"In our relationships with tv and 
radii), we've found that both have 
been a great promotional aid to the 
tlub. They've helped us acquire 
jmany new fans in and around Balti- 
more. We are particularly pleased 
.vith the televising of our away 
^ames, and we endeavor to televise as 
nanv of these road contests as pos- 
sible." 

i Besides Baltimore, only Kansas 
"ity among the newer teams has a 
|ull tv schedule. Available ARB cov- 
■rage is not extensive, but it showed 
he Athletics at the 21 level for 1960 
jight games and, surprisingly, a 
omewhat higher 22 for weekend day 
fames. This indicates that a rela- 
ively new team can turn in satisfac- 
iry ratings, though to hit the upper 
tratosphere it's necessary to win 
hore ballgames than the Kansas City 
lub has been able to manage thus 
r. 

For the 1961 major league baseball 
?ason, tv sponsorships break down 
|iisway: 15 beer; 12 tobacco; seven 
etroleum; two automobile dealers; 
ne package goods, and one baking 
>mpany. A few part sponsorships 
crnain open. 

, The most startling departure from 
>e previous season's sponsorship 
reakdown is in the tobacco field, 
jhich was represented in only four 
}ajor league markets back in 1960, 
mpared to this year's 12. Other 
ures are about the same, but absent 
is season are the bank, finance com- 
ny, and food processor that were 
n hand in 1960. 
Back in 1959, the brewery count 
as somewhat higher, at 18. There 
?re nine petroleum sponsorships that 
;ar, seven tobacco, two automobile 
alers, and three from the food in- 
istry. ^ 




ENTHUSIASM for WSJM's 'Buy-Wisely-Buy-Now' campaign caught on quickly with local mer- 
chants like Gladys Kamber of Kamber's Jewelry, here with WSJM sales mgr. Ted Faile 



RADIO 'BUY-NOW DRIVES 
CHASE RECESSION BLUES 






Droadcasters who in recent weeks 
waged verbal warfare against reces- 
sion-talk mongers, are beginning to 
rack up battle trophies. 

The verbiage, so say the station 
men, has paid off handsomely. Aside 
from tranquilizing depression jitters, 
the barrage brought about a surge in 
retailer business — and hypoed lag- 
ging station sales. 

For example, take the story which 
comes out of WSJM, the Mutual af- 
filiate serving a population claim of 
some 162.000 in the St. Joseph-Ben- 
ton Harbor, Mich., market. 

Last month, disquieted by reports 
of a reluctant buying public filtering 
in from retailers everywhere in the 
locale (and its own sales down) the 
station launched an all-out, hard-hit- 
ting Buy Wisely, Buy Now campaign 
designed to rebuild buying confi- 
dence and chase away depression 
doldrums. 

The results of the three-week fight 
to out-talk recession talkers, says sta- 
tion manager Joseph Mackin, is a 
tribute to the "power of positive 
radio." 

Retailer business reports began 
taking on a happier note and from 
two of the areas banks came reports 
like this: from Herbert C. Kerlikow- 



ske, St. Joseph Savings and Loan 
Assn." from our point of view, we've 
noticed a definite trend toward im- 
provement since the Buy Wisely, Buy 
Now campaign started. We at- 
tribute a large part of this directly 
to the campaign." And this, from 
John Stubblefield People's State 
Bank of St. Joseph — "since the in- 
auguration of this campaign, we've 
noted a minimum improvement of 
20% in the business community over 
the past month." 

Here's how the station handled its 
area economy booster: first, minute 
messages — capsule reports filled with 
optimistic business facts, were taped 
and aired on a saturation basis. 

Civic and business leaders also 
taped messages urging buying confi- 
dence in the area. Window placards 
carrying the theme as well as the 
AFA's Let's Keep Rolling Ahead 
posters were displayed by local mer- 
chants, service stations and traffic 
spots. 

A number of other stations went 
all-out to battle the recession fears 
with go-out-and-shop-now campaigns. 
Among them: WEBR. Buffalo: 
WSOC, Charlotte. N. C; KQV and 
KDKA-TV. Pittsburgh; WBIC, Islip, 
N. Y.. and WPEN. Philadelphia. ^ 



•onsor • 17 APRIL 1961 



43 



m 



n ■ 



NET TV ADVERTISER 
LIST AT NEW PEAK 

^ 376 invested in medium last year breaking record 
of 341 set in '56; latest totals include 53 novitiates 

^ P&G again cops top honors, this time with outlay 
of $46,406,679; American Home Products runner-up 



^% total of 53 companies entered 

the network t\ arena for the first 
time in L960. 

They were among a record total of 
376 advertisers who utilized the me- 




HOWARD C0H00N, pres., Dumas Milner 
Corp., brought his firm into net tv last year 



dium last year, according to tabula- 
tions just released hy TvB. This tops 
the previous high of 341 network tv 
advertisers, established in L956. 
Compilation is the work of Leading 
National Advertisers-Broadcast Ad- 
vertising Reports. 

Procter & Gamble once again tops 
the list, though its gross time expen- 
diture in net tv show a drop from 
830.293,552 in '59 to $46,406,679 
last year. 

The runner-up slot changed hands. 
American Home Products moving up 
from third place with an outlay of 
$33,376,057. 

Lever relinquished second place, 
dropping one notch with 1960 ex- 



44 



penditures of 828,613,140. The Lever 
figure was at the $32,734,955 level a 
year earlier. 

General Motors came up from 
sixth to fourth place, spending $22,- 
985,033 last year, compared to $20,- 
021,744 the vear before. 

In fifth place for 1960 was Colgate- 
Palmolive, which spent $22,511,280. 
C-P dropped from fourth place 
though its net tv expenditures were 
almost as high as its previous year's 
outlay of $22,178,524. 

Big spender among the net tv no- 
vitiates was Dumas Milner Co., 
I Pine-Sol cleanser-disinfectant, Per- 
ma Starch, etc.) which ranked 100 
with an outlay of $1,174,728. Close 
behind, in 104th place, was another 
newcomer, Plough, Inc. (St. Joseph 
aspirin, Mistol nose drops, other pro- 
prietary medicines), which spent 
$1,124,788 in network television last 
year. 

TvB noted a broadening base in 
network tv, with 96 advertisers 
spending less than $100,000. Of the 
53 new companies in the medium 
last year, 27 invested less than $100.- 
000, while 15 had gross time expendi- 
tures that ranged between $100,000 
and $200,000. 

TvB also has come out with a 
study of summer tv viewing. It 
points out that while audiences reach 
a peak in January. February, and 
March, viewing for the rest of the 
year is relatively level. While full 
week accumulated audience hits 95.6 
in March, the equivalent figure for 
\ugust is a slightly lower 92.1. ac- 
cording to TvB. 

As for daytime viewing, TvB has 
determined that the hourly average 



of homes using tv, Monday through 
Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., is 17.5 in 
the months of April, May, Septem- 
ber, October, November, and Decem- 
ber, while in June, July and August 
the average viewership was found to | 
be 18.5. 

Late night tv figures indicate that 
average of homes using the medium 
in summer is only a shade less than 
the the full-vear average During 
the summer, it's 22.5. against 2 
for the year. 

In terms of education and si/e of 
income, TvB finds that the upper 
echelons for the most part maintain 
their viewing levels all year long even 
more consistently than is the case in 
other homes. 

Rounding out the top 10 network 
tv spender roster. General Foods • 
cupied sixth place in 1960, with 
penditures of $18,623,648. In 195 
the company came in fifth, spend 
$20,890,321'. 

R. J. Reynolds again held down 
seventh position, though its expendi- 
tures were down from $16,123,827 
year before last to $15,891,416 in 
1960. 

In eighth place last year was Ster- 
ling Drug, which came up one notch 
over its 1959 showing with a net tv 
outlay of $15,358,919. This marked 
a sizeable increase over the $12,975, 
463 spent in the course of the |>r< 
vious year. 

Also in the ascendant on the net t 
expenditure ladder is General Mills 
up from tenth in 1959 to ninth las 
year. Its outlay rose from $12.''l" 
237 to $14,651,707 during the perioi 
under surveillance. 

And. in tenth place, with expend 
tures of $12,533,149, was Brown I 
Williamson. The tobacco firm cam 
all the way from 19th place the prt 
vious year during which it spent $8| 
592,953 in the medium. 

The only advertiser in the l' 1 
top 10 that did not return to th 
category last year was Gillette, whii 
came in 12th. Its expenditures wei 
off from $13,642,174 in 1959 wh- 
it held down eighth place to $12. 
075,302 last year. The second grou 
of ten for 1960: Texaco; Gill. It- 
Philip Morris; Ford; Liggett 
Myers; Bristol-Myers; National Bi 
cuit; Kellogg; American Tobacc< 
Miles Labs. 4 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 19( 



Here are all 348 net tv advertisers in over -$25,000 category 



RANK 


COMPANY 


SPENDING 


RANK 


243 


Acad, of Mot. Pict. A & S.. 


..$ 143,517 


145 


*226 


Adams Corp 


180,265 


56 


138 


Adolph's, Ltd 


606,506 


29 


*246 


Airequipt Mfg. Co 


138,991 


*311 


22 


Alberto-Culver Co 


.. 8,822,038 


97 


284 


Aluminum, Ltd 


82,175 


*236 


50 


Aluminum Co. of America.. 


.. 3,492,926 


78 


285 


Amer. Character Doll 


80,404 


337 


39 


Amer. Chicle Co 


.. 4,612,913 


341 


190 


Amer. Cyanamid Co 


280,976 


23 


178 


Amer. Dairy Ass'n 


689,839 


328 


289 


Amer. Express Co 


77,638 


306 


84 


Amer. Gas Ass'n 


.. 1,478,363 


125 


2 


Amer. Home Pro.ds Corp. . 


.. 33,376,057 


299 


256 


Amer. Luggage Works 


129,565 


132 


202 


Amer. Mach. & Foundry ... 


249,105 


148 


177 


Amer. Marietta Co 


380,884 


*322 


1fi5 


Amer. Motors Corp 


426,297 


5 


*280 


Amer. Photo. Equip. Co 


94,351 


209 


*332 


Amer. Red Ball Trans. Co.. 


36,570 


251 


73 


Amer. Tel. & Tel 


.. 1,904,364 


*302 


19 


Amer. Tobacco Co 


.. 9,701,965 


134 


248 


Amity Leather Prods 


137,595 


92 


131 


Anheuser-Busch, Inc 


646,573 


194 


45 


Armour and Co 


.. 3,988,370 


141 


43 


Armstrong 


.. 4,181,034 


*274 


229 


Arnold Schwinn & Co 


174,000 


*214 


257 


Atlantic Refining 


128,448 


279 


156 


Atlantis Sales 


500,447 


52 


167 


Avco 


422,380 


143 


273 

32 


Ballantine 


111,732 
.. 5,705,471 


99 


Bayuk Cigars 


174 


38 


Beech Nut Life Savers 


.. 4,819,117 


253 


61 


Beecham Products, Inc. ... 


.. 2,796,388 


275 


111 
196 


Bell & Howell Co 


1,009,047 
264,875 


295 


Benrus Watch Co., Inc. ... 


81 


223 


Berkshire Knit. Mills 


192,205 


296 


271 


Better Vision Inst 


113,971 


48 


749 


Binney & Smith 


137,458 


225 


90 


Bishop, Hazel 


.. 1,305,408 


28 


223 


Bissell, Inc 


160,816 


*100 


36 


Block Drug 


.. 5,242,390 


255 


'313 
130 


Blue Bell, Inc 


47,820 


*346 


Bon Ami 


655,388 


35 


135 


Borden 


613,920 


261 


258 


Botany Industries 


121,299 


129 


291 


Boyer Internat'l. Labs 


75,960 


*297 


88 


Breck, John H 


.. 1,322,555 


153 


240 


Bridgeport Brass 


... 152,204 


118 


110 


Brillo 


... 1,025,496 


163 


16 


Bristol Myers 


... 10,747,288 


184 


10 


Brown & Williamson 


12,533,149 
332,404 


180 


187 


Brunswick Corp 


199 


310 


Burgemeister 


50,794 


95 


206 


Burlington 


... 236,835 


*142 


157 


Calif. Packing 


... 488,109 


*316 


34 


Campbell Soup 


... 5,304,700 


77 


89 


Canada Dry 


... 1,311,430 


205 


New 


to network television. 






n ^nrn 






SPONSOR • 17 APRIL 1961 



COMPANY SPENDING RANK 

Canadian Breweries $ 570,799 213 

Carnation 3,009,147 14 

Carter Products 6,174,175 69 

Chanel 48,592 31 

Chemstrand 1,190,550 6 

Chemway 158,930 9 

Chesebrough-Ponds 1,786,149 4 

Chicago Printed String 32,451 147 

Chicago Show Printing 30,420 267 

Chrysler 8,638,201 119 

Chun King Assoc 37,871 303 

Citizens for Kennedy 55,475 122 

Citizens for JFK & LBJ 708,829 308 

Clark, J. R„ Co 66,290 294 

Cluett Peabody 645,229 12 

Coca Cola 561,080 241 

Coleman Co., The 42,790 101 

Colgate-Palmolive 22,511,280 83 

Colorforms, Inc 232,000 76 

Columbus Coated Fabrics.... 133,735 136 

Commonwealth Products .... 60,000 288 

Congoleum Nairn 613,929 317 

Consolidated Cigar 1,290,070 87 

Consolidated Foods 270,943 200 

Continental Baking 593,837 *238 

Continental Oil 111,430 103 

Continental Wax 219,447 *344 

Coopers, Inc 96,336 169 

Corn Products 3,342,356 333 

Coty 984,650 139 

Cowles Magazines 5,188,633 57 

Cracker Jack Co 394,135 51 

Curtis Publishing 132,976 112 

Democratic Nat'l. Comte 109,074 154 

Dem. Pty. — Cook County .... 72,950 137 

Dow Chemical 1,613,613 319 

Dow Corning Corp 72,430 329 

Drackett 3,577,524 338 

Drug Research Corp 185,910 186 

du Pont 7,558,622 247 

Dumas Milner Corp 1,174,728 149 

Dusharme Products 131,780 211 

Eagle Pencil 26,481 335 

Eastman Kodak 5,271,794 348 

Elnr Roosevelt In. for Cancer 118,265 171 

Electric Autolite Co 675,878 278 

Electric Storage Bat. Co 70,240 305 

Elgin Watch 536,419 41 

Equitable Life 835,763 25 

Eversharp 432,891 40 

Ex-Lax 324,760 173 

F and F Labs 363,347 18 

Factor, Max 258,428 150 

Falstaff Brewing 1,236,529 159 

Field Ent. Ed. Corp 587,898 49 

Filbert, J. H., Inc 45,740 *331 

Firestone 1,789,210 314 

Florida Citrus Comsn 239,331 



COMPANY SPENDING 

F.T.D. Ass'n $ 221,581 

Ford Motor Co 11,159,933 

General Cigar 2,307,464 

General Electric 5,745,718 

General Foods 18,623,648 

General Mills 14,651,707 

General Motors 22,985,033 

General Nutrition Corp 566,401 

General Tel. & Electronics.. 115,296 

General Time Corp 832,269 

Genesee Brewing 58,170 

Gerber Products 759,149 

Gibson Greeting Cards 51,783 

Gilbert, A. C, Co 73,640 

Gillette 12,075,302 

Glidden 147,323 

Gold Seal 1,151,020 

Goodrich 1,568,158 

Goodyear 1,819,908 

Greyhound 613,536 

Grocery Store Prods 77,780 

Gulf Grnty Land & Title 45,505 

Gulf Oil 1,334,609 

Hagan Chemicals & Controls 255,347 

Haggar Co 153,280 

Hallmark Cards 1,145,218 

Hambro Automotive Corp. .. 28,841 

Hamm Brewing 412,908 

Hanes Knitting 36,000 

Hartz Mountain 605,576 

Heinz 2,940,051 

Helene Curtis 3,350,042 

Hills Brothers 979,556 

Hollywood Brands, Inc 512,640 

Hoover Co 612,005 

Hygrade Food Prods 45,419 

Ideal Toy 37,790 

Ind. Cits for Nixon & Lodge 32,297 

Independent Televn. Com 315,430 

Insurance Co. of N. Amer 138,394 

International Parts Corp 552,183 

International Shoe 228,377 

Jantzen 35,920 

Jaymar-Ruby, Inc 25,179 

Jergens Andrew Co 397,224 

Johns-Manville Corp 100,497 

Johnson, Howard D., Co 55,496 

Johnson & Johnson 4,297,630 

Johnson, S. C 8,103,747 

Kaiser Industries 4,448,040 

Kayser Roth Corp 394,705 

Kellogg 9,900,196 

Kemper Insurance Group .... 551,526 

Kendall Co 476,444 

Kimberly-Clark 3,524,286 

Kiwi Polish Co 37,768 

Knapp-Monarch Co 47,160 

(Please turn to page 56) 



45 




Ws 



i/ 






n 




BETWEEN TAKES — Charles Goren (c), bridge expert and narrator of the Amana-sponsored Championship Bridge,' jokes with Walter Schwim- 
mer, head of firm producing show, as bridge champ Lee Hazen (r) wafches. Amana bought participations on ABC TV show for eight weeks 

Tv zeroes in on Amana's market 



^ Walt Schwimmer's bridge show on ABC TV reaches 
high-income, fact-conscious audience firm wants to hit 

^ Manufacturer of freezers, air conditioners stays in 
the race by specializing and stressing product quality 



I he appliance industry, a rugged 

arena even for giants of such stature 
as Westinghouse. General Electric 
and Frigidaire, might take a market- 
ing lesson from a smaller — hut hy no 
means ohscure — competitor that fi mi- 
lt pays to specialize. 

Amana Refrigeration. Inc.. in a 
relatively modest effort as compared 
to the multi-million dollar advertis- 
ing hudgets of its competition. in- 
Vested a SPONSOR-estimated 8250.000 

l(> 



in its most recent network venture — 
an eight-week campaign on Cham- 
pionship Bridge With Charles Goren. 
now in its second year on ABC TV. 
This selection was a grand slam buy 
for Amana. according to company 
spokesmen. It delivered, in spades, 
Vmana's target audience, hy age 
group, income status, and interest. 

The 27-year-old refrigeration firm 
has managed to maintain a substan- 
tial sales record even though faced 



with vigorous rivalry. Specializatioi 
is the key to Amana's success, ac 
cording to company executives 
Amana has purposely not diversifie 
its line. The only segment of the ap 
pliance industry with which i! com 
petes directly is that of refrigerator 
freezers and room air conditioners 
the sole products in Amana s line 
"We have no desire to run the gamu 
from light bulbs to vacuum clean 
ers," says Merlin E. Morii-. adver 
tising manager. 

Overall refrigeration industi\ sale 
has been estimated at SI, 129,000,001 
for I960, and the home freezer in 
dustry at $308 million for the sam 
period. Of the latter. Amana gleane< 
about 2.V ; share-of-unit sales las 
year. 

With its purchase of Champion 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 196 



J 



ship Bridge, Amana bought an audi- 
ence composed chiefly of its key mar- 
keting segment, according to Maury 
Bergman, head of Maury, Lee and 
Marshall. Amana's New York agency. 
"The show reaches a wide audi- 
ence of prospective purchasers in 
higher income brackets — quality con- 
scious viewers who have money to 
spend on a lifetime purchase such as 
a home freezer," he says. 

Independent audience research 
lone for Walter Schwimmer, Inc., 
Droducers of Championship Bridge 
(as well as Championship Boivling) 
hows that 73% of the bridge play- 
rs who watch the show have annual 
ncomes of $10,000 and over. 

The show format, a Charles Goren- 
larrated half-hour with pairs of na- 
ional champions pitted against each 
ther in rubber bridge, is a vehicle 
lat fulfilled Amana's audience atten- 
ion requirement. 

"We wanted a show with a strong 
ocal point of interest," Bergman 
ays. "one with appeal for a fact- 
eeking audience." 
Amana commercials are aimed 
ight at this audience. Factual, 
reason-why" sales messages are 
imed to appeal to logical, fact-reten- 
jve bridge-player minds. The com- 
mercials, also produced by Schwim- 
ler, are integrated technically as 
ell as creatively. Not only is this 
cost-cutting device for an adver- 
ser, but it does away with the jar- 
ing inconsistency of inserted sales 
lessages, according to Arthur E. 
ickens. Jr., Schwimmer v.p. in 
harge of programing. 
Commercials are printed right in 
ie show film, and the sponsor is 
jharged on a footage basis. The 
implete show is delivered to the net- 
"rk as a unit. In outlining 
chwimmer's pitch, Pickens says, 
We feel that an advertiser is en- 
ded to full share of sponsor identi- 
ation, as opposed to the magazine 
wept of television sponsorship." 
Championship Bridge sponsors re- 
■ive merchandising and promotion 
•osters. Schwimmer works closely 
ith playing card manufacturers, 
ridge columnists, and national 
idge associations. 

, Amana. which co-sponsored its 

'uht weeks with North American 

, in Lines and Samsonite Luggage. 

Man on 12 February and finished 



its schedule on 9 April. 

Neither Bergman nor Amana are 
newcomers to television, though their 
names are not commonly identified 
with the medium. Although they 
must, out of necessity, seek low budg- 
et vehicles, they have usually been 
able to find what they need in tv. 
Amana has sponsored some major 
broadcast efforts in the past: Garry 
Moore's mornins; radio show; Phil 



Silvers' Sergeant Bilko (alternately 
with Camels) ; NCAA football (with 
Maytag and Zenith), and they were 
instrumental in putting the Harlem 
Globetrotters on tv. 

Amana, which for 13 years has 
used two agencies, usually splits its 
advertising budget in even thirds 
among radio-tv, newspapers, and 
magazines, according to Morris. In 
{Please turn to page 55) 




COMMERCIALS for Amana were produced by same firm which produced tv show. Working on 
air conditioner commercial are (I to r) Bob Williams, announcer; Maury Bergman, head of 
Maury, Lee and Marshall, Amana's New York agency; Reinald Werrenrath, producer. Beside 
•freezer is announcer-model Renee Bramen. Sponsor is charged on footage basis for commercial 



CHECKING COPY for commercial are (I to r) Merlin E. Morris, Amana advertising manager, 
and two agencymen, copywriter Hugh Mooney and agency head Bergman. Copy is factual and 
logical on the theory that bridge players are more susceptible to that kind of advertising 



:ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 




SPONSOR ASKS 



SHOULD MUSIC PROGRAMERS PAY ATTENTION TO 




Al Heacock, program director, WBZ, 
Boston 
A definite and adamant no! Broad- 
casters are constantly faced with 
changes in musical trends, and de- 
spite the criticism of a few antago- 
nist-, have a duty to the community 
they serve to program a popular 
trend. If a broadcaster ignores his 
personal convictions and succumbs 
to the sabre pen of a newspaper crit- 



No; Dixieland 
jazz, once 
anathema to 
critics, tioiv ac- 
ceptable art 
form 



ic. then he is consciously doing an 
injustice to himself, his audience, 
and the broadcasting industry in gen- 
eral. 

Today, a broadcaster must not 
onlv be fully aware of what is musi- 
cally popular, but he must also be an 
oracle and anticipate changes in mu- 
sical tastes. Then, he must cou- 
rageously develop these changes on 
the air. Community acceptance more 
than compensates for the ire of a mi- 
nority group whose focus is blurred 
by generalization. 

It is rather unfortunate that many 
criticisms of popular music are based 
upon a comparison of what was ac- 
ceptable five or ten years ago. His- 
torically speaking, most musical 
trends have been the object of criti- 
cal wrath down through the years. 
Dixieland jazz, for instance, which 
reared its raucous head after World 
War II, was unmercifully criticized. 
It is rather ironic that toda\ it is 
featured in the leading concert halls 
of the world to standing room audi- 
ences. Controversy, it seems, breeds 
popularity! 

How can one individual influence 
the musical appetite of millions of 
radio listeners, who. in the long run, 
decide what is or what is not popu- 
lar? How can a skeptic hold back a 
trend avalanche from a public? Who, 
for instance, spent seventy-six mil- 

48 



lion dollars during a six-year period 
for Elvis Presley discs? Our indus- 
try is being constantly besieged by 
popular trends. We are obligated as 
public servants to use foresight rath- 
er than hindsight and accept these 
trends. For many, a safe middle of 
the road policy would suffice, but the 
middle of the road ratings would not 
serve nor enthuse advertisers. 

In summing up, I wish to point 
out that the critic's evaluation of 
what is good or bad musically repre- 
sents the thinking of one man whose 
know ledge of broadcasting more than 
often does not extend beyond the 
confines of his desk. As broadcasters 
we should consider criticism as a 
stimulant for the imagination and 
continue to program progressively 
for the people. 

Henry Sullivan, general manager, 
WSOC, Charlotte, N. C. 

There seems to have grown up a 
kind of running feud between the air 
media and newspapers. While I do 
not at all decry intense competition 
between the two media, I think it is 
regrettable that friction has spilled 
over into other areas, because both 
media fulfill essential and basically 
non-conflicting functions. 

In my experience, I have found 
that most columnists are community 
conscious and genuinely attempt to 



Yes; their 
criticism is 
certainly one 
guide to 
popular 
thinking 



be fair in their evaluations of radio, 
but naturally they have their person- 
al feelings. With a few notable ex- 
ceptions, most of their comments are 
made in good faith and in the inter- 
ests of better radio. Parenthetically, 
radio men never hesitate to duplicate 
favorable press comments on their 
station and use them as promotion 
pieces. 




So to answer the question. I think 
it is obvious that we should pa) at- 
tention to newspaper columnists as 
we would to any other responsible 
source that offers constructive criti- 
cism. 

Obviously, I am by no means sug- 
gesting that we allow newspapers to 
program a radio station. Their pub- 
lished advice is valuable principally 
in that newspapers to a degree re- 
flect public opinion, and to a certain 
extent even influence it. Therefore, 
newspaper comments offer a certain 
guide to the current thinking of the 
market, but this source is not as im- 
portant a criterion as station mail, 
ratings and the station mans own 
savvy, 

One of the times that I believe, 
columnists perform a real set \ ire. 
both to the public and the station, is 
when they attack the programing of 
extremist stations. By this I mean 
those stations that reduce their pro- 
graming level to the lowest demoni- 
nator. In protesting this type ol 
sound, the newspapers help radio 
maintain a prestige level which is ul 
timately beneficial to the industry a- 
a whole. 

At our station we do not prosran 
extremes, either heavy classical oi 
violent type rock 'n roll. Our aim i 
to provide our listeners with a me 
Iodic sound. Naturally we don't e\ 
elude those new artists who have 
moderate rock 'n' roll style. Sue! 
talent as the Platters or Conni 
Francis easily meets our criterioi 
which is melodic. 

We are convinced that people lik 
our melodic sound. This is bora 
out by the many comments we r< 
ceive and, of course, by our rating 
Even the press has been kind. I don 
mean that they have actually coi 
plimented our format. But we coi 
sider the mere fact that they have rj 
frained from publishing non-favo 
able items as a plaudit. Howw 
negative their attitude might l>e. i 
would never ignore them. It wou 
be turning our back on one of t!; 
most important forums of pub 
opinion. 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 19 




PRESS CRITICS? 



Rick Sklar, program manager, WINS, 
N. Y. 
Here at WINS we quite naturally 
are avid readers of radio columnists. 
As responsible broadcasters we seek 
out the greatest number of authori- 
tative sources of factual information 
and critical opinion in selecting mu- 



Press opinions 
often too 
personalized 
and contradict 
music sales 



•ic for air play and determining the 
'xtent of exposure for each particu- 
lar recording. But we read the press 
vithout a magnifying glass. The 
opinions of newspaper critics must 
lake their place alongside the trade 
publications' statistical studies of mu- 
•ic popularity and sales, the activity 
eports of local distributors and re- 
aders and the local polls conducted 
jn the form of daily community 
peelings and nightly telephone vot- 
ing, conducted by WINS to deter- 
mine the music tastes and needs of 
he communities we serve. 
Against these other factors the 
ewspaper critic's opinion of what 
epresents good listening in popular 
msic often seems to take on a high- 
r personalized shading. The writer 
laces his own taste ahead of the 
references of his readers who, inci- 
entally, are our listeners. His in- 
■nt may be identical with ours but 
ie perspective changes rapidly if 
)u substitute turntables for a type- 
riter. It all depends on where 



In pounding out a story it becomes 
> very easy to want to play cru- 
ider — to tell the public that their 
j'nses of appreciation need uplifting, 
p programing music for the air we 
low if we play the wrong music 
iey '11 tune us out. 

There are three critical moments 
at occur each time a person de- 
fies to listen to the radio — the mo- 
(Please turn to page 57) 



America looks to the South 
for economic growth, and 
the Jackson ""V 
market area 
leads that 
growth." 



Past President, 

U.S. Chamber of Commerce 



BOYD CAMPBELL 



Pres., Mississippi 
School Supply 




WJTV,, 12IWLBL 



ollingbery 



Serving the Jackson, Miss., Television Market 



W^m^^M^^ 



■ 



Can you find a 

Two station television market (both VHF) 

Where ONE STATION WINS 

442 of 499 total quarter - hours 

In TOTAL AUDIENCE? 

That's the performance of - - - - 




CHANNEL 



IN AUGUSTA GEORGIA 
ARB AUGUSTA CA., NOV. 1960 



,'ONSOR • 17 APRIL 1961 



49 



Capsule case histories of successful 

local and regional television campaigns 



TV RESULTS 



MOTION PICTURE 

SPONSOR: National Theaters Amusement Corp. \GENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The Wisconsin Theater in Milwau- 
kee took a slightl) unconventional means to attract audi- 
ences to the showing of a picture Journey to the Center of 
the Earth. The theater went the mail-order route, and pur- 
chased a campaign on WXIX-TV Milwaukee to stimulate 
mail requests lor tickets. The movie operation purchased a 
LO-da) spol campaign, and results far exceeded expectations. 
The theater received over 2,000 written requests for tickets, 
and main phone calls expressing an interest in the motion 
picture. Al Frank, general manager. Wisconsin-Fox Divi- 
sion of National Theaters Amusement Corp., noted that the 
campaign made the picture one of his most successful at- 
tractions in several years. "We always knew that television 
was an important advertising medium, and that WXIX-TV 
had a good audience, hut the results, frankh . were beyond 
our greatest expectation." Al Frank went on to say that 
television would play an important role in future campaigns. 
\\\IX-TV, Milwaukee- Announcements 



FARM EQUIPMENT 

SPONSOR: Panzer Products, Inc. \U \< 'i : 

Southern I. awn Mower & Parts Co. 

Capsule case history: Panzer Products. Inc.. found t\ 
even sell a line as specialized as tractors. In March. I'ai 
hacked up its retail outlet in Winston-Salem. Southern 
Mower & Parts Co., in sponsorship of 30-minute Sum 
afternoon segments on WSJS-T\ . The program. Pinbusi 
showed the capabilities of the Panzer tractor, and it 
oil immediately for them. About 100 people drove fi 
miles around to the location to see and ride the machiaft 
Of this number, six purchased tractors, which cost ovp 
$500 each. The second Filibuster show produced even Lin- 
ger results, with over 300 people attracted to a live demon 
stration and racking up for the advertisers a substantial 
profit. Vance Hamilton and John Bryant of Southern re I 
ported that the advertising on WSJS-TV necessitated a wait 
ing list for personal demonstrations, and at this time, will 
the Pinbuster programs to follow, it's difficult for them t< 
estimate how high sales will eventually go in this marled 
WSJS-TV, Winston-Salem Progrm 



HOMES 

SPONSOR: Huski-Bill Home- AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Huski-Bilt Homes is a newly formed 
company in the Charlotte area specializing in the erection 
of shell-type homes, built to sell for from $2400 to $4000. 
This is a highly competitive field in Charlotte, with about 
L5 companies in this category. Cecil Huskey, Huski-Bilt's 
president, needed direct leads in a hurry for his newly- 
organized outfit. With the exception of a few classified ads, 
he put his entire ad budget on WSOC-TV. His schedule 
consists of only one spot a week on WSOC-TV's Late 
U eather segment of the Eleventh Hour Report each Thurs- 
day. The campaign started on March 9, 1061. The very 
fii-t spot resulted in immediate phone calls and 12 written 
inquiries. To date there have been over l<) inquiries, and 
two sale- have been direct!) traceable to WSOC-TV. In 
addition, there are a good number of prospects that may 
buy. "\ fantastic response from a tv campaign costing only 
SO.") per week." i- the conclusion of owner Cecil Huskey. 
WSOC-TV, I harlotte, Y C. Announcements 



50 



SPECIALTY ITEMS 

SPONSOR: Cordon Service AGENCY: Dim 

Capsule case history: With a limited budget to work frorr 
the Cordon Service of Detroit had to be selective in it 
choice of advertising. Quick returns were important t 
this advertiser of specialty items. Jacques E. Goulde, ndl 
manager for the firm, bought a short schedule on WWLP 
The Kitty Broman Show, to sell its hooked rugs in tl 
Springfield. Mass., area. On the strength of one annoum 
ment alone, more than 200 orders were received, 90% ' 
which contained payment in full with the order. Gouli 
told WWLP: "We found the volume of business that WWl 1 
brought us exceptional, considering that ours is a special 
item and not of general appeal." As a result, a new sche 
ule was placed on \\ \\ l.l'. again attracting a suhstant 
number of orders for the hooked rugs in spite of a sm 
advertising budget. The firm now plans to expand its bu( 
et for television next year, with The Kilty Broman Sm 
slated to gel its advertising in this part of New Knglai 
\\ \\ II', Springfield, Mass. \imounceme 



SPONSOK 



17 APRIL 196 



-^tWGAN \ 




MICHIGAN 

WEIK"W2l-27 




NSI SURVEY— GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO AREA 

October 17-November 13, 1960 



Quarter Hours in Which Stations Deliver Most Homes 




No. of Quarter Hours 


Per Cent of Total 


WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


Mon. thru Fri. 










7:30 a.m.-Noon 


55 


25 


68.7% 


31.3% 


Noon-6 p.m. 


70 


50 


58 % 


42 % 


Sun. thru Sat. 










6p.m.-9p.m. 


72 


12 


85.6% 


14.4% 


9 p.m.-Sign off 


110 


3 


97.3% 


2.7% 



%■ Samuel Hinds appeared in 159 films, 
more than any other American actor. 



BUT... WKZO-TV Results Make You A "Star" 
In Kalamazoo - Grand Rapids! 

Almost every home in the Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids 
market is a "theater" for WKZO-TV — and this market 
is important to you! 

For example, Kalamazoo alone is predicted to show the 
greatest increase in personal income and retail sales of any 
city in the U.S. between now and 1965. As a result, 
WKZO-TV's dominant position is even more important. 
WKZO-TV delivers an average of 103% more homes per 
quarter hour than Station B, Sunday through Saturday, 
1 p.m.-Midnight (NSI— Oct. 17-Nov. 13, I960)! 

You can sell in Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids and Greater 
Western Michigan with WKZO-TV. And if you want all 
the rest of outstate Michigan worth having, add WWTV, 

Cadillac, tO your WKZO-TV Schedule. Sources: Sates Management 




&Ae SEefeeb SPfcdwwA 

. WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WWTV — CADILLAC-TRAVERSE CITY 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 



Survey of Buying Power, and NSI for Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids. 



WKZOTV 

100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • lOOO' TOWER 

Studios in Both Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids 

For Greater Western Michigan 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representative* 



ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



51 



RADIO 
BASICS 

AM & FM 



You'll find comprehensive 
data on in and out of home 
listening, SPOT and network 
trends, set production, sea- 
sonal changes, hour by hour 
patterns and the unique and 
growing auto audience. 

It should be on every desk 
of every one in your shop 
who is in any way involved 
in the purchase of radio 
time. They're so reason- 
ably priced you just can't 
afford to be without them. 



ORDER 

YOUR 

REPRINTS 

NOW 



FILL COUPON 
WE'LL BILL YOU LATER 




Price Schedule 

1 to 10 40 cents each 

10 to 50 30 cents each 

50 to 100 25 cents each 

100 to 500 20 cents each 

500 or more 15 cents each 



■ SPONSOR READER SERVICE • radio basics 
40 E. 49th Street, N.Y. 17, N.Y. 



NAME 
FIRM 
ADDRESS 



QUANTITY 



1 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
J 






.)_' 




Motional and regional hu 
in work now or recently complm 



: 



SPOT BUYS 






TV BUYS 



Pepsodent Div., Lever Bros. Co., New York: Campaign for Pepso- 
dent starts 23 Vpril in about 50 markets. Moderate frequenc'x ■- ol 
prime minutes and 2()"s and fringe minutes will be scheduled for four 
weeks. Buyers: Dick Pickett and Al Kalisch. ^genc) : Foote, Cone 
& Belding. New York. 
M. K. Coetz Brewing Co., St. Louis: Flights covering a 26-week 
period ha\e been set for Goetz beers, in about 30 markets. Initial 
schedules start this month using night minutes, 20's and l.D.'s. 
Buyer: Isabelle McCauley. Agency: John W. Shaw Adv.. Chicago. 
Pet Milk Co., St. Louis: Placements for Pet Milk begin in April in 
approximately 60 markets. Dav minutes are being slotted for four 
weeks. Media supervisor: Pat Schinzing. Agency: Gardner Adv. Co., 
St. Louis. 

B. F. Coodrich Co., Akron: Going into about 20 markets foi it- 
summer tire campaign. Schedules of fringe night minutes kick-ofl 
this month and run through 19 August. Buyer: Man Shapiro. 
W>.< \ : BBDO, New York. 

Lanvin Parfums, Inc., New York: Mother's Day promotion for 
M\ Sin and Arpege begin 28 April in 25 markets. Schedules are for 
two weeks with prime and fringe night l.D.'s being used. Buyer: 
Barbara Swedeen. Agency: North Adv.. New York. 
American Oil Co., New York: The tv end of Amoco's spring 
paign starts 1 May for six weeks. About 70 markets will gel sched 
ules of night minutes. 20's and l.D.'s. Buyer: Harry Warren. Agen 
c\ : DA rev Adv.. Chicago. 

Hills Bros. Coffee, Inc., San Francisco: In addition to its radii 
campaign on about 300 stations, tv schedules begin the end ol \pii 
in a large number of top markets. Buys are four weeks, prime and 
da) 20's and l.D.'s. Buyer: Paul Kizenberger. \genc) : Y I 
\\i-v & Son, Inc., Philadelphia. 

RADIO BUYS 

American Tobacco Co., New York: Three-flight schedule of earlyj 
and late traffic minutes for Pall Mall starts next month. Flights an 
22 May-4 June: 26 June-16 July; 14 August-3 September. Inner 
Fred Spruytenburg. Agency: SSCB, New : York. 
American Tobacco Co., New York: Lucky Strike campaign starH 
8 \Ia\ in 35-40 markets. Traffic minute schedules are being bought 
for 20 weeks. 30-40 spots per week per market. Buyer: Hope Marti 
nez. Vgenc) : BBDO, New York. 

General Motors Acceptance Corp., New York: This year's cam 
paign for GMAC financing begins 26 May for 16 weekends. \bou 
130 markets will be lined up for its traffic-time spots, one station pel 
market. Local GMAC man is important in decision. Buyer: Rem 
Meyer. Agency: Campbell-Ewald Co., New York. 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 190 




wmca 



570 kc 




Nail down more homes, 

more listeners and more 

adult listeners in the New York 

Metropolitan Area with 

Joe O'Brien on early morning 

wmca... the biggest Voice of New York. 

*No. 1 Station NSI Jan-Feb 1961 Mon-Fri, 6-9 am Avg. 



X 


wmca 

THE VOICE OF NEW YORK 


wbny 

THE VOICE OF BUFFALO 


rpi 

THE VOICE OF NEWS 


the Straus broadcasting group 



S)NSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



53 



MEDIA 

[Continued from page '5!!i 

respect for themselves in agenc) 
thinking. "We oughl to talk our- 
selves up more,' he said, '"and talk- 
up ilu importance <>f media within 
the agenc) . \ml as far as outside 

the agent 5 . well, let's face it. i oe 

outside of the agenc) 1 » n - i 1 1 « - — knows 
u hal ii edia is. 

"We're obviousl) not glamorous; 
tin \ don't produce plays and movies 
about media people. Imagine Tony 
Randall in the back mom. without a 
kr\ to the executive John. We're also 
not the horn-tooting type," he added. 
"Ma) be we should be. 

Wice president of a giant ad shop 
frank I \ stated that his answer to "Is 
media underpaid? was delivered 
"when I quit and joined the televi- 
sion department. There just isn't the 
monej that there should be. \ ou 
can't get the increases in salarv and 
prestige bv staying in media and 
doing a good job thai you can by 
moving out to something else. 

"These media guys do a tremen- 
dous job, and their status is a hang- 
over because they're still considered 
clerks l>\ top management. They 
aren't clerks; the) re probably the 
hardest working group within the 
agency, supporting most of the other 
groups. And they're underpaid. 

"It s true. ' he admitted, "some of 
the lines of authority are fuzzy. It's 
true, the) often draw on other de- 
partments in their work. But I think 
thai if the) promote themselves as 
catalysts, as collators, and often as 
originators — instead of as clerks — 
the) might move out of their rut." 

Another former media director did 
not agree. Now an account man. he 
supported the theor) that "media is 
no more important than it used to be. 
it make- very few basic decisions." 

He explained his stand, however. 
b) noting thai after a person is thor- 
OUghl) trained in the media depart- 
ment he often moves out to eventually 
become an account supervisor, and 
from this po-ilion makes media deci- 
sions. The lower echelons of media 
then "jus! break it up and buy it." 

"Salaries are low," he stated, "be- 
cause slower people stay in the lower 
positions in media, while the leading 
lights are shifted to other depart- 
ments. Mso, the tremendous influx of 
women ha- lowered the average pay. 
Women settle foi less, and manage- 



ment feels it can pav them less, as 
the) figure a timehuv ing job is not a 
long haul." 

\ veteran female timehuv et was 
quick to disagree with this conten- 
tion. She said that women timehuv - 
ers who remain in agenc) work are 
liable to remain as timehuv ct >. and 
therefore are more valuable and 
should raise the pav scale. 

"It ma) be true, she said, "that 
women buyers accept less money at 
the start, hut it is not true that they 
are short-term employees. The ones 
that don't quit the business are liable 
to be around a long time, accumulat- 
ing more knowledge as they go. be- 
cause the) don't have as much oppor- 
tunity to move out of media. 

"The women in media should not 
he an excuse for keeping the pay 
down, but should be a reason for 
raising it. They are often the most 
experienced members of the depart- 
ment, because men have left for more 
lucrative fields or other branches of 
the agenc) ." 

Several media directors reported 
that the situation is improving, that 
media is getting "a fairer shake." 

The media v. p. of a top-15 air- 
media agency went so far as to say 
that, while all departments are hav- 
ing some difficulty these days because 
of general budget tightening, media 
is having less difficulty relatively in 
securing raises and proper personnel. 

"Media has come into its own in 
the past four or five years, although 
it's still harder to get management to 
agree to our needs than to those of 
the average creative, account and 
marketing departments." he said. 

"The individual timehuyer is still 
under-priced, however, possibly be- 
cause the media departments account 
for about 20% of all personnel in 
large and medium-sized agencies. 
Management may l>e more stringent 
with media," he stated, "because 
there are so many more to pay." 

Another optimistic v. p. -media direc- 
tor noted that while account groups 
"will always be more favorably 
treated, and I'm not sure that's 
wrong.'' Media departments are get- 
ting quite close to equal standing. 

"It's still a little more difficult to 
gel the good money, hut we may he 
pulling up somewhere near even. 
because the growing importance of 
media is becoming increasingly evi- 
dent, and they'll have to recognize 
it soon." ^ 



NORELCO 

{Continued from page 41) 

cials. Frv sav-. "they have beei 
pleasant hard-sell messages. We jus 
want people to try our product, anr 
we don't want to endanger this goa 
by beating anybody over the head.' 

The Norelco line, which is pricer 
at 819.95-829.95 for men, am 
817.50-824.95 for the ladies, differ 
from other electric shavers in that i 
shaves with rotating blades, rathe 
than the conventional straight heat 
as on Schick and Remington. 

Todav Norelco is the number om 
electric shaver in many markets, Fr 
stated. It is also known throughou 
the world as the Phili-Shaver. T 
is also used for the Phili-Shaver ii 
Canada. 

"Phili-Shaver is helped tremen 
douslv by our advertising," said Fry 
"When we run print campaigns, o 
tv spot, in regions near the Cana 
dian border, we always add the lint 
'Norelco is known in Canada as thi 
Phili-Shaver'." 

In discussing Norelco's swit 
from network to spot, Fry explair 
that "tv is a pretty uncertain thir 
In every other medium, if an advei 
tiser comes along with money, he i 
treated as a buyer like everyonl 
else. But in tv, network buy- ai 
sometimes prohibitive to advertiser 
falling under the top 20 categorvl 
arrd the rest have to take the cruml 
which fall from tv's table. Tv ij 
definitely a seller's market." 

Is the switch to spot tv due to 
sonal requirements? Not exacth 
"Although the electric shaver marki 
is a gift market, we try to hav 
something running every month < 
the vear," said Fry. "After all. whi 
kers grow 365 days a year." 

As to future broadcast plans. 1 1 
said, "we make 'em as we come t 
'em." Each Norelco campaign. 1 
said, "is built around the conditio) 
existing at that time. That is why « 
do unorthodox things at time-. W 
are far from advertising purist-. 

"We in the advertising departmei 
try to do a very thorough job as a 
sistant peddlers. We're not interest) 
in building images, motivation. -t;'li 
and the like. Advertising is siniji 
arr arm of selling. I'm a peddler ar 
I'm proud of it." 

Frv works closest at North \mei 
can Philips with president P. van M 
ISerg. Philip C. Weinseimer. Jr.. vie 



54 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 10* 



president in charge of consumer prod- 
uct sales, and assistant advertising 
nanager George Games. 

Harry Fry was born in Philadel- 
phia and educated at Penn State Uni- 
'/ersity. His first job was as a feed 
salesman. Gravitating into advertis- 
ing, sales, promotion and publicity, 
le was with such firms as du Pont, 
ind Curtis Publishing. Prior to join- 
ng North American Philips. Fry was 
lead of the sales and advertising de- 
artments of Spencer Corset Co. 

Fry lives on a farm in Wallingford, 

ionn., with his wife, Martha. His 

;verage commuting time is two hours 

ach way daily, as Wallingford is 27 

liles out of New Haven. 

Fry and his wife have three chil- 

ren and a brood of grandchildren. 

Irs. Fry is active in community af- 

'lirs and politics. In fact, she ran for 

ingress in the last election. 

What are his views on the ad 

ime? "It can be a lot of fun if you 

pn't take it too seriously. The fel- 

ws who are concerned with images, 

otivation, status, are trying to im- 

;ine themselves more than what they 

'ally are — manipulators of a power- 

jl sales tool. After all, advertising 

just an arm of selling." ^ 



NANA 

ontinued from page 47) 

edition to Maury, Lee and Marshall 
\ New York, Amana employs a Chi- 
Dgo agency, MacFarland, Aveyard 
i Co. Although there seems to be 
i clearly defined line on agency as- 
inments as to media or products, 
< ' ing the past five years Maury, Lee 
ad Marshall has handled most of 
/riana's television advertising, with 



MacFarland Aveyard leaning heavily 
toward print. 

From Amana's past tv experience 
it has found that consumer reaction 
at the retail level is evident about 30 
days after the first sponsorship ex- 
posure on a show, according to Berg- 
man. This same pattern appeared 
after a month on Championship 
Bridge. 

Distributor and dealer comments 
flow in almost immediately, accord- 
ing to Morris, who adds: "We have 
been encouraged by the unusually 
favorable response from dealers on 
the bridge campaign. Generally, deal- 
ers are inclined to be critical of 
shows and commercials, but from 
their reports on Championship 
Bridge, we have obviously dealt them 
a winning hand." 

So enthusiastic are dealers, it is 
reported, Amana is now distributing 
prints of commercials from the show 
for local usage. Some of the dealer 
enthusiasm. Bergman feels, has been 
generated by Amana's merchandising 
of the show via individual letters, 
over Charles Goren's signature, en- 
couraging dealers not only to watch 
the show, but to cash in on increased 
sales volume by tie-ins with the na- 
tional sponsorship through in-store 
displays and local advertising. 

Amana's importance in its field is 
acknowledged within the refrigeration 
industry by even its stiffest competi- 
tion. Pioneering product innovations 
now accepted as standard for almost 
all manufacturers, Amana was among 
the earliest to: 

• Market the upright home freez- 
er. At first the company was severe- 
ly criticized by the industry for this 
radical move. Now. General Elec- 



tric, for example, no longer mak' 
chest-type freezer. 

• Manufacture a refrigerator- 
freezer with the freezer at the bottom 
of the unit. 

• Issue warranties not only for the 
product, but the food stored in it. 

• Initiate consumer education cam- 
paigns for efficient product use. 

Amana refrigerator - freezers are 
priced higher than the average com- 
petitive unit, which retails for about 
$189. The reason for this, accord- 
ing to Morris, is product superiority 
resulting from quality craftsmanship. 
Amana's quality reputation, both 
within the industry and out, is seen 
by some as a natural consequence of 
the Amana Society and its back- 
ground of communal living. 

Amana (Iowa) is the name of 
seven villages along the Iowa River, 
inhabited by the Amana Society, de- 
scendants of freedom-loving crafts- 
men from Germany's Rhineland. who 
settled in America over 100 years 
ago. 

Prior to the society's re-organiza- 
tion in 1932, all meal preparation 
and dining was done in large com- 
munity buildings where an entire 
neighborhood ate together. Thus, 
storing and preparation of food was 
of vital concern to the Amana colo- 
nies. When communal living was 
abandoned in the early 1930's. the 
dining buildings were converted into 
public inns and restaurants. 

Founded in 1934, Amana Refrig- 
eration, Inc., the major industry of 
the colonies today, began when 
George Foerstner, then a young mem- 
ber of the society, designed a bever- 
age cooler for use in restaurants. 
( Please turn to page 57 I 



VIEWER 

CUEER 



Why settle for ratings alone 
when TvAR Audience Dimen- 
sions pinpoint viewing in a new 
way ... by age of adults, age of 
kids, mothers of young chil- 
dren, pet owners. And so on. 
Another unique service of... 



TELEVISION ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 




<1 \SOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



55 



NET TV ADVERTISERS 

(Continued from page 15) 

RANK COMPANY SPENDING 

266 Knox Gelatine Co $ 116,325 

'339 Kurlash Co.. Inc.. The 31,960 

*269 Lanolin Plus 114,270 

198 Lanvin 260,563 

"320 Lawry's Foods, Inc 45,000 

98 Leeming, Thos.. & Co 1,188,960 

181 Lehn & Fink Prods. Corp 358,316 

'276 Lenox Inc 106,840 

3 Lever 28,613,140 

260 Lewis Howe Co 119,770 

164 Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass 429,160 

15 Liggett & Myers 10,991,624 

293 Lincoln Nat'l. Life Ins. Co... 73,815 

330 Lionel Corp 37,790 

*324 Little Crow Milling Co 42000 

96 Longines-Wittnauer Watch... 1,192,020 

26 Lorillard 7,755,281 

140 Ludens, Inc 601,020 

124 M & R Dietetic Labs, Inc 727,151 

•327 Malt-0-Meal Co 39,705 

228 Manhattan Shirt 177,853 

105 Mars. Inc 1,120,670 

79 Massey-Ferguson 1,667,479 

C3 Mattel 1,272,690 

•232 McCall Corp 162,165 

80 Mennen Co 1,621,120 

102 Mentholatum Co 1,148,774 

20 Miles Labs 6,839,446 

170 Miller Brewing 408,940 

*312 Miller Brothers Hat Co 48,018 

298 Minn. Mining & Mfg. Co 70,176 

162 Minute Maid 443,309 

116 Mogen David 938,889 

270 Mohasco Industries, Inc 114,075 

250 Monsanto Chemical Co 135,720 

54 Mut. Ben. Hlth & Ace. Ass'n. 3,036,436 

17 Nat'l. Biscuit 10,347,922 

188 Nat'l. Brewing 300,682 

24 Nat'l. Dairy 8,529,811 

155 Nat'l. Grape Co-Op. Ass'n 511,220 

265 Nat'l. Nixon-Lodge Clubs 116,550 

219 Nat'l. Presto Industries 201,364 

146 Nat'l. Repub. Cong. Com 568,150 

290 Nat'l. Repub. Sen. Com 77,205 

82 Nestle 1,611,156 

*342 N.E. Mutual Life Ins. Co 30,223 

126 N. Amer. Philips 707,302 

179 N. Amer. Van Lines. Inc 367,170 

*343 N. Woods Coffee Co 30,000 

262 Northam Warren Corp 117,870 

189 Norwich Pharmacal Co 298,788 

72 Noxzema 1,906,269 

272 Ocean Spray Cranberries 113,540 

323 Ohio Oil Co 42,686 

227 Old London Foods, Inc 179,850 

71 Olin Mathieson 2,190,483 

221 Outboard Marine Corp 194,033 

192 Pabst Brewing 276,799 

185 Palm Beach Co 316,430 



RANK COMPANY SPENDI 

187 Pan Amer. Coffee Bureau. ...$ 314 

65 Pet Milk 2,529 

•282 Peter Pan Foundations 90 

117 Peter Paul, Inc 879 

191 Phila. & Reading Corp 280 

218 Philco 204 

13 Philip Morris 11,245 

"204 Phillips Petroleum 244 

166 Phillips-Van Heusen Corp. .. 425 

37 Pillsbury Co 4,927 

85 Pittsburgh Plate Glass 1,374 

*104 Plough, Inc 1,124 

63 Polaroid Corp 2,755 

152 Polk Miller Prods. Corp 544 

242 Pond, A. H., Co., Inc 146, 

1 Procter & Gamble Co 46,406 

*1 13 Proctor-Silex Corp 950 

46 Prudential Ins. Co. of Amer. 3,766, 

70 Purex Corp 2,279 

55 Quaker Oats 3,022 

47 Radio Corp. of America 3,735 

307 Rainbow Crafts, Inc 54 

30 Ralston Purina 6,067 

252 Reader's Digest 133 

168 Realemon-Puritan Co 421 

345 Reardon Co 26 

318 Reddi-Wip Inc 45 

315 Remco Industries, Inc 46 

74 Renault 1,898 

292 Renuzit Home Prods. Co 75 

195 Republican Nat'l. Comm 265 

•286 Restonic Corp 80 

183 Retail Clerks Intrntl. Ass'n. 325 

42 Revlon 4,219 

106 Rexall 1,114 

60 Reynolds Metals 2,818 

7 Reynolds, R. J. Tob 15,891 

67 Richardson Merrell, Inc 2,374 

304 Rock of Ages Corp 56 

176 Sandura Co 386 

216 Savings & Loan Found. Inc... 212 

*326 Schaper Mfg. Co. Inc 40 

64 Schlitz, Brewing 2,625 

44 Scott Paper 4,020 

235 Scovill Mfg. Co 160 

212 Scripto, Inc 226 

*277 Sealright Oswego Falls Cor. 100 

268 Sealy 114 

59 Sears, Roebuck & Co 2,827 

107 Seven-Up 1,090 

224 Shattuck, Frank G., Co 189 

193 Shell Oil 274 

244 Shulton 139 

222 Shwayder Bros., Inc 192 

68 Simoniz 2,331 

197 Sinclair Oil 262 

94 Singer 1,245 

*334 Smith-Corona 35 



NG 


RANK 


,734 


264 


,401 


'325 


,630 


340 


,249 


120 


,348 


62 


,586 


178 


,448 


58 


,056 


281 


,524 


161 


,310 


121 


,266 


*172 


,788 


*287 


,186 


114 


,454 


300 


,170 


8 


,679 


*230 


,698 


123 


,861 


301 


,952 


108 


,574 


75 


,367 


144 


,000 


60 


,040 


86 


,599 


207 


,303 


11 


,940 


*220 


,486 


217 


,000 


*127 


,117 


91 


,700 


151 


,178 


*254 


,087 


*158 


,935 


175 


,880 


53 


,560 


115 


,160 


208 


,416 


109 


,527 


231 


,784 


203 


,729 


215 


,429 


33 


,000 


336 


,530 


160 


,948 


*263 


,494 


210 


.120 


*309 


,504 


*239 


,716 


*283 


,765 


21 


,850 


259 


,785 


*321 


.028 


27 


,578 


234 


,580 


133 


,275 


*201 


,690 


237 


,351 


347 


,956 


245 



COMPANY SPENDI 

Smith, Kline & French Labs. $ 116, 

So. & No. Cal. Renault Dlrs. 41, 

Spalding, A. G. & Bros 31, 

Speidel 830 

Sperry Rand 2,783* 

Staley, A. E. Mfg. Co 373 1 

Standard Brands 2,8871 

Stand. Oil Co. of Calif 94 I 

Stand. Oil. Co. of Ind 448 *1 

Stand. Oil Co. of N. J 786a 

Stand. Triumph Motor Co 3951 

Stanley-Warner Corp 77 i( 

State Farm Mutual 948 i3 

Steel Co's Coordinating Com. 651 

Sterling Drug 15,358i 

Stewart-Warner Corp 167 



728 

63 

1,064 

1,825 

57- 
2.48^ 
1.361 

23€ 



541* 

13:? 

48 ? 
39 
3,29 
94 
23 






Stokely-Van Camp 

Stroh Brewery 

Studebaker-Packard 

Sunbeam 

Sunshine Biscuits 

Sweets Co. of Amer 

Swift 

Technical Tape Corp 

Texaco 12,16' 

Top Value Enterprises 20(' 

Travelers Insurance 201 

20th Century Fox 691 

Union Carbide 1,30' 

Union Oil Co. of Cal 

Union Wadding Co 

U.S. Borax 

U. S. Brewers Foundation ... 

U.S. Steel 

U.S. Time 

U.S. Tobacco 

Van Camp Sea Food Co 1,03 

Volunteers for Nixon & Lodge 16 

Wander Do 24 

Ward Baking 21 

Warner Lambert 5,46 

Washington, State of 

Watchmakers of Switzerland 

Watkins Products, Inc 

Wembley, Inc 

West Bend Aluminum Co 

West. Tablet & Stationery.... 

Westgate Calif. Corp 

Westinghouse 

Whitman, S. F. & Son, Inc... 

Williams Furniture Corp 

Williams, J. B., Co 

Williamson Dickie Mfg. Co. 

Wrigley 

Wurlitzer Co 

Wyler and Co 

Yardley 

Zenith 



3 



1: 
7,6 

II 

6' 
29 
19 



irk television 



56 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 



iMANA 

Continued from page 55) 

'he company started with two em- 
loyees. Now it has 1,300. 

Foerstner, today executive v.p. and 
eneral manager of the Company, is 
nationally recognized bridge expert 
imself, who, in his 20-year bridge 
areer, has won a number of national 
s well as Iowa State tournaments. 
He has, in fact, appeared as a con- 
sider in Championship Bridge.) 
Amana does not release any spe- 
fic financial details on its sales, but. 
ccording to Morris, business has 
icked up during the past two 
lonths. He said that although other 
ictors enter the picture, such as a 
itional economic pick-up and the 
lset of Amana's heaviest selling sea- 
>n, he feels that a good share of the 
;althy sales curve can be traced to 
s company's investment in network 
idge. 

Morris adds that, during a reces- 
on year, consumers seem more 
lality minded — more inclined, odd- 
enough, to make long-term invest- 
ent purchases. This fact has helped 
ep Amana sales at a high level. ^ 



ONSOR ASKS 

onlinued from page 49) 

II ait of tune-in, the moment of dial 

U itch, and the inevitable moment of 

■- rie-out. Music is the biggest single 

ij ;tor in determining what the lis- 

« iers' fingers will do. 

jl At the moment of tune-in the lis- 

2j ler is searching for a readily iden- 

jj :able sound — a "sound security" 

II you will — something familiar, com- 

;i [table, easy to hear. The station 

• it plays the material for which its 

t( flience has already indicated ap- 

>val is forcing the odds in its fa- 

at the moment of tune-in. We 

aw the listener will then stay with 

station until something unfa- 

iar comes along — introducing a 

cordant element into the listener's 

feet world. Then comes the mo- 

nt of dial switch to somebody 

ying what you should have been 

nning or else total tune-out. It is 

imple matter of fact. If a listener 

uned to his favorite station and 

tr ten or twenty minutes a not-so- 

mlar tune, with a melody or ar- 

gement that takes effort to enjoy 

follow comes on, the listener 

ches up and switches the dial. It 

also true that if a listener has 

ched a saturation point and is 



about to tune you out, hearing a fa- 
miliar tune may stay his hand. No 
wonder the station that sharply re- 
stricts its music selections and con- 
centrates on music programing with 
precision is successful. 

At WINS our working music lists 
and exposure time-tables are revised 
weekly. Our own lists are measured 
against all major national lists. De- 
gree of rise and fall, comparative 
omissions and additions all are 
noted. We add the results of our 
listening post sessions — auditions of 
new releases attended by upwards of 



500 persons daily, and of our nightly 
telephone poll tests of new releases, 
our own weekly audition sessions at- 
tended by air and program personnel 
and chaired by myself. Then we look 
at articles by newspaper critics. In 
this way we have given the proper 
weight to each factor that exerts any 
influence on our music thoughts. 
Like all systems that work with 
checks and balances, it takes more 
time this way but we feel we're tak- 
ing the public's pulse with a time- 
piece whose second hand isn't run- 
ning slow. ^ 



TELEVISION 

BASICS 



Here's a "must" booklet for everyone in- 
volved in television. 

Get your own copy and one for everyone 
in your department. You'll be referring 
to its useful data all year round. 

Included are sections on the broad dimen- 
sions of tv; on audience viewing habits; 
on network trends; on advertising expendi- 
tures — network spot and local; on color 
tv and stations presently using color 
equipment. There's a brand new section 
too, this year, on the viewing habits of 
the summer television audience. 



WEIL BILL YOU LATER 




NSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



57 







It's a happy time for advertisers. Each weekday 
when Joey, the WSOC-TV Clown, gathers his live audience 
around, many thousands of other Carolina young are with 
him-and his sponsors-on Charlotte's channel 9. 
This award-winner is typical of the local programming 
that changed audience patterns here in America's 
19th largest tv market. Buy WSOC-TV- a better buy. 



WSQC-TY 



CHARLOTTE 9-NBC and ABC. Represented by H-R 



58 



WSOC and WSOC-TV are associated with WSB and WSB-TV, Atlanta, WHIO and WHIO-TV, Dayton 

SPONSOR • 17 AI'IIIL 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 




WASHINGTON WEEK 



17 APRIL 1961 

C»»yrl|ht 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The long-delayed administration regulatory agency recommendations were ten- 
tatively scheduled to go to Congress last week. 

They were expected to deal lightly with the FCC and FTC, while striking hard at the Fed- 
eral Power Commission. Advance word indicated that much additional power would he asked 
for all agency chairmen. This power would extend both to speeding up processes and to 
reorganization. 

Major recommendation, aside from an FPC reshuffling, would set up an Administrative 
Conference. Present plans would have Judge E. Barrett Prettyman, who made a regulatory 
agency study for former president Eisenhower, head this activity. It would function along 
lines of the Judicial Conference, which has brought uniformity to Federal court procedures. 

The regulatory agencies, lawyers who practice before them, and the bar would all be rep- 
resented on the conference. Object would be to recommend changes in regulatory agency 
operations to make them more standardized, and to raise their standards of effi- 
ciency and ethics. 

A threatened collision between the White House and Congress over the regula- 
tory agencies still hangs in the balance. 

A Senate Judiciary subcommittee has issued a report which, on its face, doesn't appear 
to be too far removed from the Presidential message. 

However, the more important House and Senate Commerce Committees haven't been 
heard from. Republican members of the House Committee, on the other hand, have been most 
vocal in disapproving the call by President Kennedy for regular reports from regulatory 
agency chairmen. 

Democrats, including House Commerce Committee and House Commerce Regulatory agen- 
cy subcommittee chairman Oren Harris (D., Ark.), have professed not to be worried by the 
reports. Nevertheless, they remain watchful. 

The impression is that the President will be permitted to go just so far before he is 
jumped on by both Congressional Republicans and Democrats. 

The ad and broadcasting industries have much at stake in this situation: At 
present it is a cold war along Pennsylvania Avenue, but if it becomes a hot war the 
regulatory agencies will be in the middle. 

The FCC and FTC have been moved far along the road toward tougher regulation by de- 
velopments of the past few years. An open war over control of these bodies would actually 
take the form of both sides scanning them for regulatory laxities, as well as for delays. 

New probes of the agencies and the industries they regulate would almost surely be in 
order. The old probes are what caused the present new regulatory directions. New ones 
would speed and intensify the process. The two industries are already faced with enough of 
a crackdown and sorely need peace on the Potomac. 

Filing dates on the FCC's proposal for new programing forms have been delayed 
until 1 May after NAB asked for more time for its members. 

The only industry hope appears to be to convince as many broadcasters as possible that 
they should argue against the new forms. 

However, the delay seems only to have gained — delay. There appears now to be no con- 
ceivable argument or set of arguments, whether filed by one or thousands, that can turn the 
FCC aside from a 5-2 vote in favor of the proposals. 



&INSOR • 17 APRIL 1961 



59 



Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 






17 APRIL 1961 

C»pyrliht IMI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATION* INC. 






A new syndication sales formula is developing which may be a positive ans> 
to some of the medium's recent dilemmas. 

It's this: syndicators are getting spot commitments from national advertisers for aroi 
50 markets and then are selling a show along with guaranteed participations business i 
market-by-market pattern. 

The formula takes advantage of three recent tendencies: 1) the heightened advertiser 
terest in national spot-film programs, 2) the flurry of new production in children's prop rami 
and 3) the big increase today in spot spending. 

Three advertisers bought segments of programs for multi-market coverage from these 
syndicators: 

• CNP has 20 stations already for Funny Manns, a 104-segment eight-minute comedy 
ries, all of them taking advance participations for two advertisers: Sweets Corp. and 
Toy. 

• TPI is selling Dick Tracy with built-in Post Cereals participations; it has 20 mark 
most of them taking the Post spots. 

All three advertisers — Sweets and Ideal Toy in Funny Manns and Post in Dirk Trac 
start during the summer. 

Both shows have unusual merchandising angles, too: Post has rights to use the 
Tracy character, and Cliff Norton, live star of Funny Manns, is shooting star commerc 
and will do personal appearances. 

(For latest sales on both shows, see FILM WRAP-UP, p. 70.) 

Look to the smaller syndicators for interesting examples of ingenuity and 
provisation. 

Robert Weisberg has left Tv Stations, Inc., to join Trans-Lux Tv as the head of an 
tirely new program distribution project. 

In brief, Weisberg will set up a new unit to organize the exchange of tv progn 
produced by stations, a sort of broadcaster's co-op. 

For the first time there will be one central clearing house through which stations 
contribute and obtain station-produced programs. 

Although "public interest" shows will be an important part of the new unit's funct 
documentary, drama, etc., will also be stressed. 

Unlike previous ventures by other companies, the new Trans-Lux unit will not engag 
conventional syndication or in any co-production investment: only shows produced by 
tions and tested on the air will be exchanged. 



Three beer advertisers have signed up for Ziv-UA's King of Diamonds in 
tal of 33 markets. 

They are: 

• Jax Beer (DCS&S) in 18 midwest and southwest markets, all not yet selected. 

• Piel's Beer (Y&R) in five markets, namely New York. Philadelphia, Hartforc 
Haven, and Syracuse. 

• Jacob Schmidt (Maxon) in ten midwest cities still being selected. 

In other words Broderick Crawford is back, three breweries have him, and the 1% I 
action-adventure syndication selling season is officially declared open. 






60 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Tv Marketeers is going into first-run distribution, has opened new offices, and 
is looking for salesmen in the South, Southwest, and Northeast. 

The new show: Adventures of the Sea Hawk, 26 half hours, starring John Howard. 

Wynn Nathan, president, has hired Charles Ross for New York and is looking for other 
salesmen; in charge of other offices are Ed Simmel in Hollywood and John Rohrs in Chicago. 
(For details, see FILM WRAP-UP, p. 70.) 



Re-run strips of shows like CBS Films' Whirl ybirds are earning many time pe- 
riod victories in 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. slots. 

ARB and Nielsen reports of November through January give these scores — and note the 
small point difference between the two ratings services in most cases. 



CITY & STATION 

Baton Rouge, WBRZ-TV 
Charleston-Huntington, WCHS-TV 
Houston, KHOU-TV 
Portland, Me., WCSH-TV 
Portland, Ore., KGW-TV 
St. Louis, KSD-TV 



ARB 
12.0 

14.8 
20.0 
23.5 
13.0 
15.0 



NIELSEN 
22.6 

19.3 
20.8 
15.8 
13.2 



ITC's Susie has grossed close to $4 million in domestic syndication and foreign 
sales since 1956. 

And that's not counting earnings for the original CBS TV run, the summer 1957 re-run 
on CBS TV, and the 1957-58 network re-run on NBC TV. 

The series has been sold in syndication to 183 domestic markets and also in 37 for- 
eign countries. 

MCA is now selling six different re-run series at once, all of them recently 
released. 

Oldest in syndication, M-Squad is now in 40 markets, 12 of them just reported. 

MCA's group of 108 full hour shows added 11 markets for a total of 31. (For sales de- 
tails, see FILM WRAP-UP, p. 70.) 

Full hour programing is still something of a syndication novelty. Stations are stripping 
them in early evening, using them late at night, and on weekend afternoons opposite baseball, 
states MCA v.p. Lou Friedland. 

The sixth re-run in MCA's portfolio is Staccato, which came out earlier this month. 



Videotape Productions of New York has taken over the former DuMont studios 
and will also build another studio elsewhere. 

The DuMont facility, now owned by Metropolitan Broadcasting, is one of the largest in 
the east. The tape producer plans to rent sales headquarters and office space elsewhere until 
its own building has been constructed. 



It's been traditional among research firms to sell nothing but their own services. 

An exception, you might say, is Home Testing Institute, which puts out TvQ ratings, 
among other services. 

HTI's president, Henry Brenner, has paid Odyssey Productions an undisclosed sum to 
represent the producer in negotiation of re-run sales of High Adventure, a Lowell Thomas se- 
ries which earned a high TvQ score. 



pNSOR • 17 APRIL 1961 



61 










17 APRIL 1961 

Copyright 1961 

•PONSni: 

PUBLICATIONS INC 



A round-up of trade talk 
trends and tips for adrm 



SPONSOR HEARS 



Apparently the cosmetic field is going through one of those restive periods. 

Reports have it that Helena Rubenstein (OBM) is looking around for another agen 
mooring and that Revlon is doing some shopping on its own. 

Another cosmetic also said to be on the prowl (and with BBDO's blessings) : Coty. 

San Francisco media sellers are comparing the new rules and regulations in « 
feet at the Compton office there to the procedures in a grocery chain's buying hea 
quarters. 

Reps must now do business with Compton under tbesc restraints: 

1) They can only be seen three afternoons a week, between 2:30 and 5 p.m. 

2) Interview time is limited to 10 minutes. 

3) Telephone calls must be confined to between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. If a i 
outside these hours deems what he has to say is urgent he can leave his name and nu 
with the operator, who will relay this information to the media department. 

Helene Curtis is testing a new product: an effervescent headache remedy a 
Alka Seltzer. 

The item hasn't come out of the test marketing stage; hence, no assignment of 
agency as yet. 

Don't be surprised if the National Football League splits up its season's gs 
between two tv networks next season. 

The league's president Pete Rozelle is said to be somewhat disturbed by the possibi 
of Washington bringing up a monopoly angle. 

It's likely he let up a sigh of relief when NBC TV outbid CBS TV for the rights to 
1961 championship games. Price on this package: $850,000, with $550,000 for 
rights alone. 

Always a piquant point of interest in any trade is a catalogue of the sons l 
have tread in the footsteps of the fathers. 

A random list of those in the agency business: 



62 



FATHER 


AGENCY 


SON 


AGENCY 


James T. Aubrey 


Aubrey, FM&H . 


Stever 


DCS&S 


Robert T. Colwell 


JWT 


Howard 


Kudner 


Robert T. Colwell 


JWT 


Richard 


B&B 


Earl Cummings (dec.) 


Cummings, B&McP 


Barton A. 


Compton 


Clifford Dillon 


SSCB 


Bryan 


B&B 


Marion Harper 


retired 


Marion, Jr. 


McCann-Kvickson 


A. W. Hobler 


R&B 


Edward W. 


NL&B 


C. J. LaRoche 


LaRoche 


Chester R. 


LaRoche 


Henry Legler 


Warwick & Legler 


Ross 


Bates 


Maurice H. Needham 


NL&B 


Richard H. 


NL&B 


1 1^ in \ 0. Pattison 


B&B 


William 


OBM 


William F. Wright 


JWT 


William J. 


B&B 


Note: Another Aubrey 


son is CBS TV president 


; a second Hobler chip is with Vi 


Productions. 












SPONSOR • 17 APRIL 1 



sm 



REACH 
MORE 

FARMERS 
IN THE 
TEXAS 

HOT SPOT 



In the Beaumont- 
Port Arthur-Orange 
market more than 
300,000 people live in 
rural agricultural 
communities. Average 
effective buying 
income for the market 
is over $6,500 
per family. 
You reach them and 
a total of 750,000 
prosperous Texans 
and Louisianans 
in this agricultural, 
petroleum, petro- 
chemical, manufacturing, 
lumbering and 
shipping rich Hot 
Spot only through 
KFDM-TV. 



■ H2> 



: •"-■«-. 



\ 



I ■ ■■ , 



f&Mm-M&i': 



Peters-Griffin 
, -Woodward 



S3NSOR • 17 APRIL 1961 



BEAUMONT • PORT ARTHUR • ORANG! 



63 



SPONSOR 
WEEK 

WRAP-UP 



TWENTY-FIVE years with WMCT Broadcasting Co., Memphis, for Earl Moreland, station 
manager, is cause for celebration. Congratulating him are (l-r): Dick Quigley, Blair TV, St. 
Louis; Moreland; Steve Beard, Blair TV, Dallas; and Henry W. Slavick, gen. mgr., WMCT 




Advertisers 




Brown «K Williamson (Batei 
will have a minimum of I 
weekly minutes in nighttime m 
work programs come the fall. 
The placements through the wee 



NIGHT 

Sun. 

Mull. 

Tues. 

Wed. 

Thurs. 

Sat. 

Sat 



I'KOGIt \ \l 

Bus Stop 
Surfside 6 
New Breed 
Naked Citj 
Boh Cummings 
Defenders 
Make Spare 



M IN 



To be bought 
Total 

Campaigns: 

• Barcolene, Boston, has a heav 
spot tv campaign going in all the m 
jor markets for it> Liquid Barcole 
Jet Starch, and Barcolene I >l«-a 
Tabs. 

Thisa 'n' data: Wyler & (Ion 
pany (dehydrated food product; 
has associated itself with Borden J 
a division . . . J. H. Filbert, Ball 




'INFORMAL HEARING' to honor new 
FCC Chairman Newton N. Minow (I), sees 
him shaking hands with Ben Strouse, pres. 
of Broadcasters Club of Washington 

CIVIL DEFENSE award is made to Jack 
Stapp (r), pres. of WKDA radio, Nashville, 
and Wilbur Creighton, Jr. (I), pres. Nash- 
ville Construction Co. by Newton Moore, 
director of Civil and Defense Mobilization 




TIMEBUYER OF THE YEAR luncheon plans were outlined to representatives from memb 
firms by chairman Frank Pellegrin of the Station Representatives' Award Committee. Attendii 
the special committee luncheon were (standing, l-r): Tom White, Avery-Knodel; Max Friedma 
H-R; Ralph Connor, McGavren; Ray Simms, H-R; Al Perenty, Adam Young; and (seated, I-; 
Wells Barnett, John Blair; Pellegrin, H-R; Larry Webb, H-R; and Kenneth Klein, Kati Agenc] 
This will be the only all industry award to an individual for placing radio and television til 




SI'U.NSOK 



17 APRIL L9l 



lore, has set up a special products 
jivision to spearhead a stepped-up 
romotion and advertising program 
>r Mrs. Filbert's mayonnaise and 
ther company products except its 
mrgarine. 

EOPLE ON THE MOVE: James 
. Judge, promoted to assistant man- 
ner, press services, General Foods 
. . Robert O. Howard, from ad- 
srtising and sales promotion man- 
:er. B. F. Goodrich associated tire 
id accessories division, to manager 
lvertising, International B. F. Good- 
ch Co. division . . . J. F. Matthes, 
group advertising director for flour 
id mixes, General Mills grocery 
-oducts division, and C. W. Plattes, 
i advertising manager cereals and 
|it foods, O-Celo and refrigerated 
•oducts, that company . . . Curtis 
ent, from sales promotion man- 
rer, Schick Safety Razor Company 
. . Jack Scollay, from marketing 
vision manager, American Sugar 
sfining Company, to field sales man- 
ner. Lehn & Fink division, Lehn & 
nk Products Corp. 



,'■_.., ,j ; _ 3 



McCann-Erickson last week lost 
a $6-million chunk of its billings 
— the defector was Bulova — and 
picked up $1 million via the Cali- 
fornia Coca-Cola Bottlers. 

New home for the watch account: 
SSC&B, which handles the Bulova ra- 
dio line. 

Bulova, like other jewel watch mak- 
ers, has been taking a clobbering 
from the pin-lever watches a la Timex. 



Fuller & Smith & Ross last week 
initiated what its v. p. and man- 
ager of tv/radio Ed Mahoney, 
called "a new service by an agen- 
cy for a client." 

The service: point-to-point closed 
circuit tv, was inaugurated when 
Hercules Powder Co. took the New 
York press to the opening ceremonies 
of its new plant in Lake Charles, La., 
via a live tv conference. 

The seTvice function, according to 
Mahoney: "With clients like Hercules 
whose plants might be dangerous to 



wander through, and with clients who 
might do special work in classified 
areas such as missile bases, the press 
can be brought to the scene via tv." 
Other predicted uses: 

1. An agency with this type of 
set-up could preview pilots of net- 
work shows direct from the studios 
to their own offices. 

2. Advance showings of auto mod- 
els could be made to small groups. 

3. The set-up can be constantly 
used as a tv laboratory to test com- 
mercial ideas and to show the final 
product to clients. 



Agency appointments: P.S.I., Inc. 
(Profit, Security, Income), newly- 
formed major food chains, Southern 
California, to Lennen & Newell 

($1.2 million) . . . Elisabeth Stewart 
Swimwear, from David Olen; Cali- 
fornia Wine Association (Eleven Cel- 
lars Wines, Aristocrat Brandy, Am- 
bassador Wines and Vermouth) , from 
Johnson and Lewis; Nulaid Eggs, 
from Botsford, Constantine & Gard- 
ner; and Nurserymen's Exchange 



BRILLIANT formal opening of WFAA (AM-FM-TV) Dallas, was attended by executives and 
celebrities in the broadcasting and advertising business. Host and master of ceremonies, Mike 
Shapiro, gen. mgr., points out studio tv camera to: (l-r) E. M. (Ted) Dealey, chairman of 
board of A. H. Belo; Oliver Treyz, president, ABC TV; Julius Barnathan, v. p. for affiliated 
stations ABC TV; and James Moroney, Sr., vice-chairman of the board of A. H. Belo 




ADED SOUTH is Mr. Richard Grahl, (I), 
ior timebuyer at William Esty, just pre- 
ted top prize in a recent contest sponsored 
WQAM, Miami. Lola DiBella presents 
' :ation prize as John Blair, rep., looks on 




'ONSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



65 



(seeds importers -exporters, bulbs, 
plants and garden supplies); all to 
Lennen & Newell, San Francisco 
. . . Fyre-Flite (home fire escapes) 
Uumatic Corp., Boston, to Jerome 
O'Leary, Boston . . . Technicolor, 
Inc., to Kenyon & Eckhanlt. L.A., 
for its Technicolor home movie pro- 
jector, Technicolor film processing, 
new Technichrome film and new prod- 
uct . . . John E. (Tain Co. I potato 
chips, mayonnaise, Oxford Pickle 
Co. i . Cambridge, Mass., to Charles 
F. Hutchinson . . . Cadillac Dog 
Food, to Elknian Advertising, 
Philadelphia . . . Aqua Filter Corp., 
Newton. Mass.. I disposable cigarette 
filter tips i . to Smith/Greenland . . . 
Wolf Brand Products. Corsicana. 
Texas, subsidiary of the Quaker Oats 
Company, to Clay Stevenson Assoc. 
as marketing counsel. 

More agency appointments: \t- 
lantic Bowling Corp.. to Albert 
Frank-Guenther Law . . . Mont- 
gomery Ward, to Campbell-Mithun 

. . . Life Assurance Co. of Pennsyl- 
vania. Philadelphia, to Wermen & 
Schorr . . . Bulova Watch, from 
McCann-Erickson. to Sullivan, 
Stauffer, Col well & Bayles ($4 
million l . . . Philip Morris Overseas, 
to Robert Otto & Co. S.A., Mexico 
City, for all its brands in Mexico in- 
cluding Philip Morris. Parliament 
and Marlboro . . . The Greater Cleve- 
land Rambler Dealers Association, to 
Geyer, Morey, Madden & Bal- 
lard. 



New agency: Carey Advertising, 
Inc., Ithaca. N. Y.. headed by James 
W. Carey. 

New quarters: The Julian Bright- 
man Co. at 480 Commonwealth Ave.. 
Boston. 

Kudos: Foote, Cone & Belding 

creative director and executive com- 
mittee director Fairfax M. Gone. 
named member of the Chicago Board 
of Education. 



PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Ed- 
ward J. Schultz, from v. p. for sales. 
Abitibi Corp., Detroit, to executive 
v. p. and general manager. \\ ent/.el 
and Fluge, Chicago . . . Harold B. 
Simpson and Frank J. Mahon to 
associate media directors, W illiam 



F.stv . . . Joel Stein, from Grey, to 
Smith Greenland a> accounl execu- 
tive . . . Donald T. Matthews, from 
accounl staff. Grant, to account execu- 
tive. Doyle Dane Bernbach, Chicago 
. . . Raymond Castner, t<> account 
executive, Kudner . . . David N. Nel- 
son, from associate research director 
to account executive. Chocks i chil- 
dren s vitamin tablet) account. Wade 
. . . John L. Dossett, from Dow 
Chemical, to marketing and research 
manager. W ade . . . David B. Mc- 
Call. to copj chief. Ogilvy, Bensun 
& Mather: he succeeds David Ogilvv 
in this position . . . Bert Landon, 
from director public relations. Inter- 
national Latex Corp.. to public rela- 
tions director. Ben Sackheim . . . 
H. Victor Hollingshead. from me- 
dia director. Grant. Detroit, to media 
director Detroit office. Geyer, Morey, 
Madden & Ballard. 

They were elected senior v.p.'s: 
Victor G. Bloede, Ken McAllister, 
and Lee Rich, all at Benton & Bowles. 

They were elected v.p.'s: R. Page 
Jones, at Phillips-Ramsey. San Diego 
. . . Jerry N. Jordan and Norman 
H. McMillan, at Aver. 



TV Stations 



c*-»+« 



JLE, 



P 



love 



TOTAL STATIONS ON THE AIR 

(as of 1 March. 1961 I 
AM: 3,556 
FM: 839 
TV: 541 

BOUGHT/SOLD/ APPROVED : 
Bought: KXO, El Centro, Calif.. 
by Marco Hanan. present general 
manager that station: Robert Or- 
donez. Chap Rollins. Gordon Belson 
(station staffers); and William 
Ewing, El Centro attorney, from 
Leonard Feldman. Chicago; brokered 
by Edwin Tornberg & Company. New 
York City; price: $242,296 . . . 
WNCT (TV), Greenville. N. C. and 
30$ of WECT (TV), Wilmington. 
N. C, by new company headed l>v 
J. B. Fuqua. president and owner of 
W.JBF (T\ |, \ugusta. Ga.. from 
Carolina Broadcasting System; price: 
$2,445,000; the buying company will 
be owned III)', hv Fuqua and 20$ 
hv A. Hartwell Campbell, WNCT gen- 
eral manager: the W ECT remaining 
7<)' < ownership is not affected hv the 

sale. 



\v estinghouse Electric's \\ ai 
radio division reports its sales 
tv receivers and radios are clim 
ing. 

Distributor sales to tv dealers di 
ing the January-February period til 
year showed an increase of 25' « <>\ 
the same period of I960. 

The radio market experienced! 
similar sales trend with a 11' 
during these month-. 

The Television Arts & Scienc 
group is mulling over plans f 
its first global convention 
broadcasters scheduled for eai 
November. 

The meeting place: New York Ci 
On the agenda : a full week I 
forum-, seminars, panel discussioi 
exhibitions, screenings, and demc 
strations. 

Pulse, which looked into the 
set placement habits of New Yoi 
City viewers, disclosed that 42 
of the tv sets owned by inulti- 
families are located in the livil 
room, compared to 92% 
single sets. 

Where the other sets go: 21 
go to the children's bedroom: 20' i 
the master bedroom; and the 
maining 17' '< to sundry other lot 
tions. 

Sports sponsors: The Omaha t. 
sociation of Independent Insuran- 
Agents, to sponsor, for a seven-we) 
run. Tee to Green, a 15-minute »< 
program over KMTV, Omaha. I 
program was produced by the staticj 

Kudos: Westinghouse Broadca 
ing, the recipient of four maj 
awards from these groups: Thon 
Alva Edison Foundation: the Alfr 
I. DuPont Foundation: the Freedo 
Foundation: and the National C< 
ference of Christians and Jews . 
WJXT, Jacksonville. Fla.. award 
the Commandant's Citation of tj* 
Marine Corps League . . . Expedited 
local awards presented to: K \B 
TV, Los Angeles, and KBTV. [> 
ver. for Expedition: Colorado: hi 
orable mention to WABC-TV, N 
York Citv. for Expedition: Xeic ) 01 
WBKB. Chicago, for Expeditii 
i /'lease turn to page 68 i 



66 



SPONSOR 



1 i U'RIL 1 



' 




3t\ tde yW oj J\lik and ^orgij! 



SREEN BAY, WISCONSIN 

HAYDN R. EVANS, General Manager • Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY 



JONSOR • 17 APRIL 1961 



67 



WRAP-UP 

[Continued from paiie 66) 

Science; KDNO-Ti . Seattle, for Ex- 
pedition: \orthwest; \\ SIX-TV, 
Nashville, for Expedition: Tennessee; 
and KOCO-TV, Oklahoma City, for 
Expedition : Oklahoma. 

Thisa V data: WTO. Minne- 
apolis-St. Paul, having gone inde- 
pendent, is spending over $210,000 
for studio technical equipment and 
production facilities ... A substantial 
interest in Teleglobe Pay-TV Sys- 
tem. Inc., has been acquired b) Mc- 
Fadden Publications, Inc. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Rob- 
ert A. Davis, administrative assist- 
ant to KPLR -I A . St. Louis, president 
and general manager Harold Koplar, 
appointed acting station manager . . . 
James Q. Frost, from program di- 
rector. KTVO-TV, Ottumwa, Iowa, in 
advertising and sales promotion de- 
partment. WBZ-TV, Boston . . . H. 
Needham Smith, from sales man- 
ager, WTRF-TV, Wheeling, \\ . Va., 
to local sales manager, \\ KRC -T\ . 
Cincinnati . . . Theodore H. Wal- 

atWGY... 

being listened to 
rather than just 
being heard is the 
difference between 
selling and not 
selling. People 
listen to WQY 
because they like 
WGY PERSONALITY 
PROGRAMMING. 
That's why WGY 
will sell for you 
in Northern New 
York and "Western 
New England. 982-20 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
HENRY I. CHRISTAL COMPANY 



WGY 



810 KC, 
50 KW 



A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 
ALBANY • SCHENECTADY • TROY 



worth, Jr., elected v.p. and general 
manager, WNBC and WNBC-TV, 

New , i ork Citv . . . Howard A. 
Wheeler. Jr.. from promotion cop) 
editor, to publicit) director, \\ 1 1 1 \ . 
Charlotte, Y C. . . . Bill Hare, to 
associate farm director, KWTV. Okla- 
homa Citv . . . Burke \\ . Ormsby, 
from program director to promotion 
and program director, KOGO-TV, 
San Diego . . . Mike Boyd, from 
news stall. KOMO-TV, Seattle, to an- 
nouncing staff, WMTWTV. Poland 
Spring, Me. . . . Richard D. God- 
dard. from the I . S. Weather Bureau 
Ucron, Ohio, office, to kYW-TV, 
Cleveland, a> -talT meteorologist. 

New v.p. 'a at Crosley Broadcast- 
in": John B. Babeock, WLW-I, 

Indianapolis: Walter Bartlett, 
WLW-C, Columbus; and George J. 
Gray. WLW-D, Dayton. 

Six South Dakota radio stations, 
in an effort to broaden out its 
sales penetration, have organ- 
ized themselves into a South Da- 
kota Salesmaker Stations group. 

The group is made up of these sta- 
tions: KISD, Sioux Falls: KWAT, 
Watertown; KABR, Aherdeen; 
KIJV, Huron: KBRK, Brookings; 
and KYNT, Yankton. 

The South Dakota broadcasters al- 
so appointed a rep firm: Dean and 
Slaughter, Inc. of Minneapolis. 



Ideas at work: 

• WJBK, Detroit, has come up 
with a method for helping out the 
spring-time house hunting crowd. 
The station put on the air a Home 
Hunter Hints program which gives 
out tips on getting maximum value 
for money spent on a new home. The 
feature is aired around the clock at 
regular intervals all throughout the 
weekend. The station's program hints 
source comes from leading architects, 
builders and developers in the Greater 
Detroit area. 

• WQXI, Atlanta. Ga., has its lis- 
teners involved in a guessing game 
contest with the recorded heart beats 
of a nationally known individual as 
the major clue. Additional verbal 
clues are given each day to lessen the 
mystery. The contest prize: an all- 



expense paid three-da) trip for two tf 
the Kentuck) Derb) with box sea] 
hotel accommodations, air transport 
tion and enough tickets to insui 
at least one v\ inner. 

• WINS. New York City, ran 
contest around the staging of a di- 
jockev motorboat race around Mai 
hattan Island. Listeners were askt 
In write in their predictions not on 
to name the winner — but the time ii| 
\ dived. The contest and race was ^ 
forerunner promotion of the launcl 
ing of a series of boating news rl 
ports including off-shore weather, ill 
let reports, Coast Guard bulletin- ai 
safety reports. 

• KALL, Salt Lake Citv. v\i 
Mothers Da) just around the corne 
decided to pay tribute (with tongit 
in cheek) to mothers-in-law and rtl 
a special Mothcrs-ln-Law Day. Y< 
the occasion, the station urged <j 
sons-in-law to enter, for a drawin 
the name of their respective moth 
in-law. To the lnckv winner we 
tin- arrav of prizes: a one-way tick 
to the Salt Flats (30 miles away fro 
anv form of civilization), a fieiiui 
voodoo doll — with pins (to wh 
awav her time), and a box of statio 
en (to channel her literarv drive 
poison pen letters). 

Thisa V data: WFAA, Dalia-. h 
adopted a single rate policv . 
KFBB, Great Falls, Montana, h 
distributed to the trade press, copi 
of its recent We Want To Put Hi 
tuna On The Map editorial . . 
WRCV, Philadelphia, broadcast 
its entirety a two-hour big band 
v iev\ live from the Wayne Theater 
that city. 

More Power: WBRE, Wilkes-Bai 

Pa., to 1000 watts. 

Happy birthday: WBOY. Clad, 
burg, W. Va., celebrated it- 2 
broadcast year, 12 April. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Ric 
ard C. Shepard, from general mi 
ager, WHAM, Rochester, N. Y., 
station manager, WGR, Buffalo, N. 
. . . Robert Jenkins, from sale- -1 
to general manager K1VT • - 
City, Iowa . . . Ronald R. Wn ■ 
from publicist. KGO-TV and k 1 
Radio, San Francisco, to manaj 
advertising and promotion, K(.<) I 



68 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 1SJ. 



) . . . Adrian R. Cooper, from 
Jcount executive to local sales man- 
ser, WHLO, Akron-Canton, Ohio 
I . George R. Faulder, to com- 
urcial manager, KCUL, Fort Worth 
. . Marty Hull and Roger Nelson, 
t sales staff, W-CAR, Detroit . . . 
I»b Cox, from account executive, 
JDGY, Minneapolis -St. Paul, to 
8 es staff, KDWB, that city . . . Don 
1 *dges, to sales manager, KISN, 
I rtland . . . Burton M. Wanetick, 
t v.p. and commercial manager, 

*!*EB, Holyoke, Mass Ed Sam- 

i . from sales staff, WOIA, Ann Ar- 
Ir, Mich., to sales representative, 
\1BK, Detroit. 

Networks 

^ ■-■— Mai mmmm m 

r JC outbid CBS for the exclu- 
de radio and tv rights to the 
' tional Football League Cham- 
I • n ship games (2) on a two- 
Mr contract. 

\BC is paying $550,000 for the 
rhts and has packaged the two 
»nes at $850,000, covering rights, 
ciduction and time. 

D'S boasts its new programs are 
ding better, rating wise, than 
n* programs on any other net- 
t<rk. 

fere's how Nielsen rates them, ac- 
ting to CBS TV: 
\ programs: 

v WORKS AVERAGE RATING 

CBS 20.1 

" ABC 18.4 

NBC 18.0 



pv programs : 

V WORKS 

CBS 
ABC 
NBC 



AVERAGE RATING 
19.1 
16.6 
15.6 



N. tv sales: Borax's 20 Mule 
rim Products (McCann-Erickson) 
i bought participations in these 

] TV's daytimers: The Jan Mur- 
i Show; Loretta Young Theatre; 
[ m These Roots; Make Room for 

Idy, and Young Dr. M alone. 



ftiewals: Campbell Soup has re- 
ft ed sponsorship of CBS TV's Las- 
I for the 1961-62 season. 

1 radio sales: Coca-Cola (Mc- 

f> n-Erickson) has purchased full 



sponsorship of the 33rd annual Acad- 
emy of Motion Picture Arts and Sci- 
ences "Oscar" presentation on ABC 
Radio. 

New affiliate: WTVY, Dothan, 
Ala., with CBS TV. 

Net financial report: AB-PT, has 

declared its second quarterly divi- 
dend of 25 cents per share on the cor- 
poration's outstanding common stock 
and 25 cents per share on the out- 
standing preferred stock, payable 15 
June. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Jo- 
seph W. Fitzpatrick, promoted to 
assistant to the comptroller, AB-PT 
. . . John J. Brennan, from director 
of accounts, Bloomingdale's, to AB- 
PT as director of the internal audit 
and systems department. 

He:/--.— >'- 'os 

Awards for the best tv and radio 
commercials in the Southeastern 
region were presented by the Ra- 
dio & Television Representatives 
Association of Atlanta at its third 
annual awards banquet, last week. 

Top tv commercials award went to 
Henderson Advertising, Greenville, 
South Carolina, for the Sea Pak 
Frozen Foods commercial. Certifi- 
cates of Excellence went to Liller, 
Neal, Battle & Lindsey for H. W. Lay 
Company; C. Knox Massey & Associ- 
ates for B C Remedy Company; Hen- 
derson Advertising for Texize Chemi- 
cals; and McCann-Marschalk for At- 
las Finance. 

In radio, top award went to Liller. 
Neal, Battle & Lindsey for Life of 
George commercials. Certificates of 
Excellence: Burke Dowling Adams, 
for Delta Air Lines; Bearden-Thomp- 
son-Frankel & Eastman-Scott for Or- 
kin Exterminating; Lowe and Stevens 
for Ashcraft- Wilkinson; and Harry 
Gianaris & Associates for Maola Milk 
and Ice Cream. 

Rep appointments: WDXB, Chat- 
tanoooga, Tenn., and WLAN, Lan- 
caster, Penn., to Weed . . . WNHC, 
New Haven, Conn., and WQXR, New 
York City, to Foster and Creed, 
Boston . . . KQBY, San Francisco, 
and KBUZ, Phoenix to Adam 
Young . . . KMEO, Omaha, Neb., 



Review, please, 
the latest survey 
of your choice: 

Nielsen (Louisville Metro 
Area, Nov.-Dec, 1960) 

HOOper (Oct.-Dec, I960) 

Pulse (Louisville Metro 
Area, Nov., 1960) 

Trendex (Louisviiie,Aug. 

24-28, 1959) 

Verifak (Louisville, Oct., 
1960) 

• 
Conldn (Louisville, Nov., 
1960) 

Unbelievable 
undu p licated audience 
in the 

Louisville Metro Area 
belongs to WKLO* 
Need we say more? 

'Nielsen, November-December, 1960 



see 




s: NSOR 



17 APRIL 1961 



robert e. 
eastman & < ■«>.. inc. 

Other Air Trails Stations: 

WING, Dayton, 0. 
WCOL, Columbus, 0. 
WIZE, Springfield, 0. 
WEZE, Boston, Mass. 



69 



and KRSI, Minneapolis-St. Paul, to 
Broadcast Time Sales*. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Rob- 
ert L. \S i Miam-. from radio account 
executive, New York office, to man- 
ager, San Francisco office, Daren F. 
McGa\ ren. 



Film 



Paramount Pictures has finally 
made its major plunge into tv 
with the acquisition of a half in- 
terest in Talent Associates. 

Negotiations were completed by 
Barne\ Balaban. Paramount Pictures 
president, and Alfred Lew and David 
Susskind, president and executixi 
v.p., respectively, of Talent Associ- 
ates. 

In existence since 1949. Talent As- 
sociates grossed about $5.5 million 
in 1960. 

Sales: Stations signing for CNP's 
Funny Manns with Sweets Corp. and 
Ideal To\ participations are: WISN- 
TV. Milwaukee: WEWS-TV. Cleve- 
land: \\ ARC-TV. New York: KSL- 

«,WGY 

being listened to 
rather than just 
being heard is the 
difference between 
selling and not 
selling. People 
listen to WQY 
because they like 
WGY PERSONALITY 
PROGRAMMING. 
That's why "WGY 
will sell for you 
in Northern New 
York and "Western 
New England. 98220 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
HENRY I. CHRISTAL COMPANY 



WGY 



810 KC, 
50 KW 



A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 
ALBANY - SCHENECTADY • TROY 



TV, Sail Lake City; WSA1 -TV, Wail- 
sau; WGAL-TV, Lancaster; WBNS- 

TY. Columbus: W SI5-TX . \llanta: 
W VLB-TV, Ubany, Ga.; WJHG-TV, 
Panama Cit) ; \\ EAl -TV, Eau Claire; 
KSD-TV, St. Louis: WCCO-TV. 
Minneapolis; WGAN-TV, Portland; 
KING-TV, Seattle; WSOC-TV, Char- 
lotte; \\ IIC. Pittsburgh; WGN-TV, 
Chicago, and KBTV, Denver . . . 
I PI s stations for Dick Tracy I most- 
Is with Post cereals participations) 
a..-: \\ l'l\. \,u York; KTTV. Los 
Angeles: WGN-TV. Chicago; WCAU- 
TV, Philadelphia: WXYZ-TV, De- 
troit: WHDH-TV. Boston; KGO-TY. 
San Francisco; WTAE. Pittsburgh: 
KMOX-TV. St. Louis; WTCN-TV. 
Minneapolis: WOW-TV, Omaha: 
KUTV, Salt Lake City; WWL-TV. 
New Orleans, and WTVN-TV, Colum- 
bus. Ohio. 

More sales: MCA's full hour re- 
runs to WISC-TV, Madison; WLUK- 
TV, Green Bay: KTNT-TV, Tacoma; 
WCRP-TV. Chattanooga: WRVA- 
TV, Richmond; KGBT-TV. Harlin- 
gen: WKRG-TV. Mobile; WMAZ-TV. 
Macon; WTTV, Bloomington; KOVR- 
TV, Stockton, and WHIO-TV. Dayton 
. . . MCA's M-Squad to KGW-TV. 
Portland; KNOW-TV, Monroe ; 
WOAI-TV, San Antonio; WBNS-TV. 
Columbus; KING-TV, Seattle; 
WTVR, Richmond: WTCN-TV. Min- 
neapolis; KVOS-TV. Bellingham; 
WSM-TV, Nashville; KOTA-TV, Rap- 
id City; WFBC-TV, Greenville, and 
WMTW-TV. Portland . . . Seven Arts 
Warner Films of the 50's to WCYB- 
TV. Bristol; KREM-TV, Spokane; 
WCTV, Tallahassee; WISC-TV. Madi- 
son; WTVY, Dothan; KGW-TV, 
Portland; WTVO, Rockford; WSLS- 
TV. Roanoke; also 18 special films to 
WNBQ, Chicago, and WSLS-TV, 
Roanoke. 

International: ITC of Canada re- 
ports first quarter sales up 62 per 
cent over 1960. 

Programs & producers: ITC has 

worldwide distribution rights to AT\ 
coverage of Adolf Eichmann trials 
. . . Bill Ward to produce and Marilwi 
Keith and Alan Bergman to write 
ITC's Jo Stafford specials. 

Trade notes: TV Marketeers' 

New York office is now at II E. 42nd 
Street: new offices in Holhwood are 



at 650 North Bronson and in Chica 
at Oil' North Michigan \venue 

PEOPLE ON THE MONK: \\ 
liam Wallace elected president 
IVT . . . Murray Oken appoint 
eastern division manager of Tra 
Lux Tv . . . Alan Baker named pi 
lie relations director for First Int 
national Assembl) of Academy 
Television Arts and Sciences 
Newl) elected officers of NT. A a 
Oliver A. Unger, chairman 
president: Ted Cott, v.p. owned 
tions; Berne Tahakin. v.p. sal 
E. Jonny Graff, v.p. east co 
sales; Peter Rodgers. v.p. w 
coast sales; Henry Crossman, 
technical operations: Leonard 
Gruenberg. v.p. sales developme 
David J. Melamed. acting tieas 
er; Justin M. Golenbock, set 
tary ; Robert A. Goldston, ass 
ant secretary, and Leon Peek, ass 
ant treasurer. 

^ 

FCCs longtime chief of its bro. 
cast bureau Harold Cow gill, 
slated to be guest speaker at I 
Florida Association of Broadc; 
ers annual confab at Mian 
Seveille Hotel, 15-18 June. 
His subject: License renewal! 

Other trade dates: 

19 April, Los Angeles Chapter 

the American Marketing Vssociati 

Carolina Pines Banquet Hall. He 

wood. Speaker: Kenneth C. Sum 

v.p. and radio tv creative direc 

Needham. Louis & Brorb\ . His « 

ject: The Role of Television in 

Marketing Picture. 

5 May, American Marketing \-- 

ation 6th regional industrial mat 

ing research conference, Waldorl 

toria. New York City. The the 

improving the efficienc\ of indusl 

marketing research. 

12 May, Connecticut Broadcast 

Vssociation annual meeting. Wavi 

Inn, Cheshire, Conn. 

8-9 June, North Carolina Ass 

lion of Broadcasters spring m 

Holiday Inn. West Chapel Hill I! 

Durham. North Carolina. 

1-11 November, First internati'* 

assembK Acadeim of Television ' 

\ Sciences. New York Citv. 



70 



SPONSOR 



I , U'IMI. 



mm 



\y 







■ 




advertising 

speaks 

for itself 



^ 



Prepared by Bozell & Jacobs, Inc. 

Fine.WhO Sharpens yOUX* P e O P 1 e ?... The Advertising Federation 
if America works continually to sharpen the skills of those who sell this nation's products and services. > All year round, 
■nearly every business day, one or more of the 180 advertising clubs of the AFA and the Advertising Association of the West 
ucross the country participate in workshop sessions or in advertising and marketing clinics. > From June 11-23, AFA will 
lold its annual Advanced Management Seminar in Advertising and Marketing, supervised by faculty members of the 
Harvard Graduate School of Business. At these seminars, advertising executives sharpen skills, gain scope, by working with 
nanagement problems in which advertising is a vital element of the overall operation. For details, write AFA. > Participa- 
ion in these programs makes for more effective businesses and a more vigorous economy. You have a stake in this economy. 
To further your business interests, join AFA-AAW and lend this study program your leadership. You will profit from it. 



THE ADVERTISING FEDERATION OF AMERICA 

655 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK 21. NEW YORK 

FOR THE AFA AND 

THE ADVERTISING ASSOCIATION OF THE WEST 

FERRY BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO II. CALIFORNIA 

I 

\ r he Advertising Federation of America and the Advertising Asspciation of the West and their 60,000 members marshal the forces of the advertising 
ndustry to protect its freedoms, to promote education in, for and about the profession, and to conduct public service activities through its media. 





w 



a.WGY 

being listened to 
rather than just 
being heard is the 
difference between 
selling and not 
selling. People 
listen to WGY 
because they like 
WGY PERSONALITY 
PROGRAMMING. 
That's why WGY 
will sell for you 
in Northern New 
York and Western 
New England. 982-20 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
HENRY I. CHRISTAL COMPANY 

810 KC, 
50 KW 



WGY 



A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 
ALBANY • SCHENECTADY • TROY 



enter your 
personal 
subscription 
to SPONSOR 

$8 for 1 year 
$12 for 2 years 



v and radio 
lEWSMAKElf 




William C. Cillogly, director of sale 

the ABC TV central division since 
l ( ->.">7. lias been |m>mott>d to ABC TV 
president in charge of sales. Chicago 
He replaces James \\ . Beach who has 
drawn from active association with 
Vmerican Broadcasting Co. A gradual 
Colgate U., Cillogly joined \P,C in I 1 )" 
an account executive for the network's cei 
tral division, and was appointed eastern sales manager in I'J.V 
Prior, he handled local radio/tv sales for WOW, WOW-TV, Oinah; 

Richard H. Schutte has been named 
\\ estern radio sales manager for the Metro- 
politan Broadcasting properties. He comes 
to Metropolitan from Bohert E. Eastman & 
Co. where, for the past three years, he was 
vice president in charge of the company's 
Pacific coast operations. Prior to that, he 
was general sales manager for KCBS in 
San Erancisco. Schutte, who will make his 
headquarters in San Francisco, was for a time associated with CI 
Badio Spot Sales in that city, and other West coast radio outlei 



Dick Kelliher has joined BK.0 General d 

national sales manager of the company g 

San Erancisco property, KFBC. He \\i 

headquarter in New York City at the offa 1 

-el up last year by the companv for i 

national sales force. Kelliher comes ll 

BKvO from Adam ^ oung where he has beel 

manager of the San Francisco olliee: mil 

western manager in Chicago: and most r 

sales manager and assistant national sales manager i 

. Kelliher was educated at the University of Chicagi 





centlv. eastern 
New York Cit\ 



Herb Mendelsohn, well-known New York 
Citv broadcast salesman, has joined the 
American Broadcasting Company's flag- 
ship station. WABC, as sales manager. He 
replaces Barry Geoghean who resigned. 
Mendelsohn comes to WABC from WINS, 
New York Cilv. where, for the past five 
years, he bad been chief account execu- 
tive. Prior to bis WINS affiliation, be was 
sales manager for the Hart Publishing Co. 




lb e new \\ \ISC sa 



1 \ei ulivc 1- iii.ii 1 ii 1 1 and ib< fatbei "I tin ee i hildl en. 



72 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL 196,' 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



writing about the problems of product protection, Robert M. Reuschle, 

iieral sales manager of WLAC-TV, Nashville, can call upon a uniquely 

ied background. He bought time at three top agencies (McCann-Erickson, 

&B and Y&R), worked for a rep (Headley-Reed) and managed a uhf 
let (WHUM-TV , Reading, Pa.). Reuschle (pronounced rue-shell) feels 

product protection requirements by advertisers are out-dated and unreal- 
c and urges a study of consumers on the production protection problem. 




Does consumer care if competitive ads are 'too close?' 

" nder today's competitive demand for the best in audi- 
Ifce reach, it seems to me television is operating, under 
sue archaic rules which hurt buyer and seller alike. I 
nieve the time has come for a more realistic attitude on 
Ip part of advertisers and agencies on the question of 
Iquired time separation between "competitive" products 

television. 

In print media competitive ads are "a glance apart" in 
rlboards, newspapers and magazines. In network tele- 
kfion we see two or more different automobiles advertised 
< ring the same television program and some of the com- 
preials even go so far as to name their competitive cars, 
mots are bought by the ton in radio and competitive 
|oducts are often read by the same announcer within the 
jme program and just a few minutes apart. 
,Now, don't get me wrong. I am not in favor of run- 
jng competitive products back to back in tv. But, I do 
*k, what, if any, magic is there in 30 minutes, 20 minutes 

even 15 minutes separation? 

Like most stations, WLAC-TV strives to maintain 15 
.inutes separation between competitive products, but it 
n t easy. For example: network commercials are subject 
t frequent change with little or no advance notice, often 
suiting in stations having to move competitive spot an- 
buncements. Many advertising agencies, when placing 
lot announcement business, send us a long list of products 
hich they claim are competitive to their own. Some beer 
ccounts refuse to have their spots adjacent to a headache 
emedy commercial, and recently we were advised that a 
ommercial for a baking powder was competitive to a pan- 
ake mix. Many agencies fail to notify stations of the 
iroducts which they consider to be competitive but notify 
is quickly after they see monitoring reports. Stations also 
ind that agencies neglect to notify networks when product 
ommercials are changed in network programs and the 
)est warning is when it is caught on the air. 

Let's examine just two examples of this commercial 
; cheduling and sales problem. National account brand 



"A" has bought the station break at 1 p.m. and requires 
15 minutes separation from any product it considers com- 
petitive. It is followed by a feature movie which carries 
participating advertisers on a rotation basis within the 
movie. Competitive brand "B" is a participator. The film 
director, when screening the movie prior to its show date, 
determines the most suitable times to break the movie for 
commercial intermissions. Obviously the movie plot and 
action guides this to a great extent. Brand "B" runs at 
4:13 p.m. and Brand "A" asks for a credit because "our 
policy is 15 minutes separation." 

Now, let's look at a network situation. Manufacturers 
today are diversifying the kinds of products they sell. The 
sponsor and network decide on the list of products which 
may be carried within the network program purchase with 
guaranteed product protection by the network. But not all 
of these products are running within the network pro- 
gram. Yet, apparently, stations are not supposed to sell 
spot announcements adjacent to this network program if 
they are competitive to any of the brands which were 
given network product protection. Obviously this nar- 
rows the field of availabilities which a station can submit. 
Some good spots will have to be by-passed. 

Recently, I read where a survey found that on the aver- 
age day a typical viewer was exposed to over 500 com- 
mercial messages. When you consider the number of 
soaps, detergents, household cleansers, headache reme- 
dies, stomach remedies, cold remedies, etc.. telecast each 
day, I seriously doubt whether the viewer considers, or, 
for that matter, is even aware of so-called competitive 
products being "too close" to each other. 

I suggest that, somehow, within the advertising industry 
this problem should be given close inspection. A compe- 
tent research firm could make a study to determine the 
awareness to competitive products being "too close." If 
the results showed that the public is not concerned, then, 
certainly, it would be a great boon not only to stations and 
networks but to advertisers as well. ^ 



SPONSOR • 17 APRIL 1961 



73 



SPONSOR 



Advertiser responsibilities in radio/ tv 

Recently in Washington we talked with NAB president 
LeRo) Collins about a phase of the broadcasting industry 
which, in our opinion and liis. receives too little attention. 

This is the matter of advertiser and agency responsibility 

lo the air media — the obligations which all those who use 
and benefit from radio/tv selling power must assume. 

Governor Collins, in hi- RTES speech last month, called 
on the "gentlemen of the advertising world" to recognize and 
cooperate in the work broadcasters are doing to improve 
quality and asked specifically that advertisers "support our 
code- by doing husiness with those who adhere to them." 

SPONSOR stands squarely behind Governor Collins in this 
request. We believe, in fact, that supporting the Tv and 
Radio Codes i- the minimum which broadcasters should ex- 
pect from their advertising customers. 

Vctually, the responsibility goes much deeper. Radio and 
tv, unlike other media, are specifically licensed to operate 
in the public interest. And any advertiser who participates 
in radio and tv shares, in our opinion, in this public interest 
responsibility. 

This means more than simply providing commercials which 
measure up to the industry codes and standards of good prac- 
tice, though that, of course, is important. 

It means supporting the kind of programs which enable 
the indus.tr) to fulfill its public service obligations. 

It mean- refusing to support, regardless of ratings, pro- 
main- or program schedules which are destructive of the in- 
dustry's best interests and clear mandates. 

It mean- hacking those station operators who are doing 
an outstanding job of providing the kind of community serv- 
ice called for in their licenses. 

It mean- refusing to hack or providing advertising funds 
tor stations clearly neglecting their public obligations. 

\hove all. it mean- thorough and intensive knowledge l>\ 
agencies and advertisers ol the working of the broadcast in- 
dustry -i) that decisions can he made, not merely "on the 
rating-." hut on the higher level of station, network, and 
indi\ idual performances. 

These, in SPONSOR'S opinion, are the obligation- which 
radio/tA advertisers owe the nation and industry. ^ 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Audio: According to a report 1>\ 
columnist Earl \\ ilson, a rating sen 
ice recentl) plumed 1.000 men and 
asked, "To whom are you listening 
at this moment?" And 007 of them 
answered : "To m v wife." 

Video: Karl ma\ have thought the 
above ua- a gag, hut Lynn Dender ■ 

ARB confirms the fact that the an| 
swers can be prett) Far out. She- 
cites the gu\ who. when asked whal 
he'd last seen on tv before he turnfl] 
it off. replied: "Just lines and iiia 
{ties." 

Price is right: The retailing linn 
rumored in this space last week as 
the sponsor of a fall 0] Western en 
try to be called Colt 44.95. will pre 
cede this with summer re-runs. Th« 
shows are to be called: Surf side Two 
for-Eleven and 76.89 Sunset Strip. 

Voters: Remember, as you \ie\ 
ABC TV's Oscar show tonight. Gi; 
Youngs remark to CBS Radio abou 
Hollywood: "Out there, blood i 
thicker than talent." 

In disguise: WSAI, Cincinnati. ha< 
an Internal Revenue agent spend ai 
afternoon at the station last wee 
taking phone calls from listeners wit 
income tax problems. So the gu 
that the Treasury Department sen 
over was named Mr. Blessing. 
Big deal: This ad read — "Looks 
acts, feels like your own hair" — i 
an attempt to sell hairpieces. T 
some of us this means. "It s stringi 
jailing out. itchy. 

Sign off: There's a motel in Evan 
ville. Indiana, that used to have 
sign out front that read, "Free I \ . 
until a couple of weeks ago when 
guest checked out and drove aw a 
with a $225 portable set. 
Comeback: Indianapolis wrestlin 
fans have an added incentive f< 
watching WTTV's bonecrackin 
shows, because commentator Sai 
Menacker. an ex-grappler. apparen 
I) has a few lends still going. 1 1 
best fight in months took place du 
ing the taping of a recent series i 
bouts, when Dick the Bruiser leape 
from the ring and ripped Sam s CO! 
to shreds. The station announced 
would leave the extra bout on tl 
tape, but did not mention what, 
am thing. Sam ripped to shreds. 



71 



SPONSOR 



17 APRIL I or 



what qualities 

do you look for 

in hiring salesmen ? 



® 9 



A wise man once said "What you are shouts so 
loud that I can't hear what you're saying": There's 
a moral there for buyers of time. Screaming, 
shouting, sensational formats may be popular in 
some places, but Iowans prefer our style. Proof: 
our news and sports ratings have led all the rest 
for years and years. 

Choose your station just as carefully as you hire 
your own salesmen — on the basis of integrity, 
stability and responsibility. In Des Moines KRNT 
and KRNT-TV have these qualities. It's no wonder 
Iowans believe in and depend on the KRNT 
Stations: 

* People have been dialing KRNT Radio for reliable news and 
sports information for 26 years. Highest ratings for years. 

* ARB and Nielsen prove our television news and sports are 
also the "preferred ones". Always top rated. 

* The community knows locally-produced religious and civic- 
minded shows appear regularly in our schedules. 

* Local radio advertisers have given us by far the biggest share 
of business in a six-station market. 

* Local television advertisers have given us 80% of the local 
business in a three-station market. 

Check our ratings with the Katz Man. 
He can help you hire our salesmen, too. 




KRNT 



Radio and TV - Des Moines 

An Operation of Cowles Magazines and Broadcasting. Inc. 



THE SELLING SOUND FROM SIGNAL HILL /PARTE 



Dave Garroway, 8 years 



Hi-Noon's Cartoons, 7 years 




UNBROKEN 

YEARS OF 

SALES 

EXPERIENCE 



When you buy participating spots on WDAF-TV, you're buying built-in stal 
bility of programming (see above), continuity of audience, the area'l 
most successful air personalities, and a solid selling climate that hasn'H 
missed a beat since 1949. That's why we're consistently tops in the bi/ 
Kansas City market . . . and why we consistently move more products fot 
our advertisers. There's more to the story . . . ask your Petry man about it 



WDAF O TY • SIGNAL HILL • KANSAS CITY • 



S'«ioi or smvicr 




WROC-FM, WROC-TV, Rochester, N. Y. • KERO-TV, Bakersfield, Calif. 

WGR-FM, WGR-AM, WGR-TV, Buffalo, N. Y. • KFMB-AM, KFMB-FM, ^""V^^/'^N 

(EdwardYpetry *Yco., Inc.) 

KFMB-TV, San Diego, Calif. • WNEP-TV, Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Penn. V_yVLyV_y 
WDAF-TV, WDAF-AM, Kansas City, Mo. 



Represented by 



The Original Station Representatn 



TRANSCONTINENT TELEVISION CORP. • 380 MADISON AVE., N. Y. 1 



. 



24 APRIL 1961 
40c a copy* SS a year 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/ TV ADVERTISERS U 




ire than 60 of America's leading, creative radio stations are 
irching ahead in their markets with CRC'S SING ALONG 
IGLES, Volume I. And, as a result of this phenomenal 
reptance and rousing success of SING ALONG Volume I, VSf • 

ire's now a SING ALONG JINGLES, Volume II ... 15 stirring new station 
)motion jingles creating an audience participation with YOUR station I.D.'s 
paralleled in broadcast history. Really, they're that good! Call or wire collect 
DAY for FREE audition. 



ommercial Recording Corp. 



Box 6726 

Dallas 19, Texas 

Rl 8-8004 



CHOLESTEROL 
WAR COMING ON 
TELEVISION? 






Health claims of oils 
hit hard at fats but 
the latter have not 
yet met the challenge 

Page 29 



How Bates and 
Burnett differ 
on use of tv 

Page 32 

Radio/tv blend 
pushes Ehler 
sales up 80% 

Page 38 ' 




Autos go for 
variety in spot, 
network tv buys 



Page 40 



DIGEST ON PAGE 



500 MILE RACE 



*% 'J- x 

■ 

: - w 




WHAT'S FIRST WITH HOOSIERS 
IS FIRST WITH WFBM-TV 



Spectacular Coverage 

During the month of May, a task force of 40 men 
is assigned to cover the events surrounding Indi- 
anapolis' world famous 500 Mile Race, 500 Festi- 
val and $50,000 Golf Tournament. Few network 
special events involve the logistics of men and 
equipment the WFBM Stations have committed 
to this elaborate coverage. 

What's first with Hoosiers is truly first with 
WFBM-TV. And unequalled manpower* and 
facility* give this station the opportunity to report 
the interests of the area we serve intensively, ex- 
citingly. Your product deserves this kind of sell- 
ing climate. Ask your Katz man. 



* 




BASIC NBC- 
TV AFFILIATE 



•Y. 20-man News-Information Services Depart- 
ment. Three news cruisers, giant mobile TV unit, 
two color-equipped television tape recorders. 

A service of TIME-LIFE Broadcast 
Represented Nationally by the KATZ Agency 




LOUSands Of MetrodelphianS will be present at his trial. 
will he word of testimony given the previous <la\ with 

iglish translation. Th< Li Fan! WIP is the first I 

ind be complete proceeding 

a ill hear the compl< timony each evening on WIP-fm whil< 

WIP vil] hear direcl reporl y hour from MetroMedia's Martin 

ial in person. 

i 10-minute wrap-up via ' transmission, each even- 

WIP. 

med to living with hi- VvTJr. 



A METROPOLITAN BROADCASTING STATION HARVEY I GLASCOCK V.P. & GEN. MGR. REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY 




i t ol. 15, No. 17 • 24 APRIL 1961 



CHANNEL 9 

WTVM 

COLUMBUS, GA 



• A Great New Market! 

82% unduplicated audience on fhe 
only primary ABC station between 
Atlanta and the Gulf! 

• Top ABC Programs! 

Shows like Maverick, Cheyenne, The 
Real McCoys, Sunset Strip, Hong 
Kong, and The Untouchables. 

• The Best of NBC 

Programs like Wagon Train, The 
Price is Right, Huntley-Brinkley 
News and Bonanza . . . plus fop 
syndicated programs. 



CHANNEL 9 



000© 



COLUMBUS, GA. 






Call the man from 
YOUNC TVI 

Ask about 

availabilities on 

WTVC CH. 9 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The #1 night-time 

station in 

Chattanooga! 



SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



ARTICLES 

Cholesterol war on tv? 

29 Producers of dairy products haven't countered hard-sell claims of Wesson, 
Mazola, Flei&hmann's, bul battle may begin at drop of medical report 

Bates vs. Burnett on tv 

32 Kecent disagreement with Rosser Reeves' hook by Leo Burnett reflects a 
basic collision in notions about how agencies should use the medium 

Light touches for heavy topics at WBC meet 

36 Change-of-pace original *kit- spoofing the tv industry was the enter- 
tainment fare at Westinghousc Broadcasting public service confei 

Ehlers up 80% — here's why 

38 Regional coffee switches most ad dollars from print to radio/tv blend: 

utilizes radio news and weather for circulation, tv shows for prestige 

Autos go for variety on tv 

40 ^' M ' n lv hillings among i ai makers last year spurred the broadening of 
video techniques among them. Spot spending in 1960 was up about 25% 

Radio's package tour sell wins listeners 

41 New Haven radio station WEL1 tells how its package lour promotion 
paid off in winning over listeners and potential advertising clients 

NEWS: Newsmaker of the Week 6, Sponsor-Scope 17, Sponsor-Week 23, 
Sponsor-Week Wrap-Up 54, Washington Week 61, Film-Scope 62, —- 1 >< .i i -« . r 
Hears 64, Tv and Radio Newsmakers 69 

DEPARTMENTS: Commercial Commentary 8, Reps at Work 

13, 49th and Madison 14, Sponsor Asks 44, Radio Basics 46, Spot Huvs 48, 
Seller's Viewpoint 70, Sponsor Speaks 72, Ten-Second Spots 72 



Officers: editor and publisher, Norman R. Glenn; executive vice presi- 
dent, Bernard Piatt; vice president and assistant publisher, Arnold Alpert; 
secretary-treasurer, Elaine Couper Glenn. 

Editorial: executive editor, John E. McMillin; news editor, Ben Bodec; 
managing editor, Alfred J. Jafje; senior editor, Jane Pinkerton; midwest edi- 
tor, Given Smart; film editor, He) ward Ehrlich; associate editors, Jack Lind- 
rup, Ben Seff, Michael G. Silver, Ruth Schlanger, Diane Schwartz; columnist, 
Joe Csida; art editor, Maury Kurtz; production editor, Frances Giustra; 
editorial research, Elaine Johnson. 
Advertising: eastern manager, Willard Dougherty; southern manager, 
Herbert M. Martin. Jr.; midwest manager, Paul Blair; western manager, 
George G. Dietrich, Jr.; sales service/production, Jo Ganci, Shirley S. Allison, 
Barbara Parkinson. 

Circulation: manager, Seymour Weber; reader service. Lynn Cane; Kath- 
ryn O'C.onnell. 

Administrative: a>>istant to publisher, S. T. Massimino; office mana- 
ger. Fred Levine; George Becker, Michael Crocco, Syd Gottman, Wilke Rich. 
Irene Sulzbach, Geraldine Daych. 



■ 



i 



^ 



© 1961 SPONSOR Publications Inc. 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation, and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St., New York 17, MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 
N. Michigan Av. (11), Superior 7-9863. Birmingham Office: 3617 8th Ave. So., FAairfax 
2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Blvd. (28), Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 
3110 Elm Av., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada $9 a year. Other 
countries $11 a year. Single copies 40e. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd class '. 
postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



SI'ONSOK 



2\ U'KIL 1961; 



DIALM 
MURDERS 
COMPETITION 

KOGO-TV's Seven Arts premiere proves lethal to competitive shows in San Diego prime time 




ARB rates KOGO's "Films of the 50's" 
audience share above all other shows combined 



AVERAGE (2 HOUR PERIOD) 



RATING SHARE 



KOGO ("Premiere Movietime" telecasting 

Alfred Hitchcock's "Dial M for Murder") 26.0 50.9 

Station A 9.5 18.6 

Station B 12.0 23.5 

Other 3.5 6.9 




Jay Grill 

Vice President, KOGO-TV 
San Diego, Calif. 



Says Jay Grill, " 'Dial M's' high ratings made happy music but the big 
Cash Register Crescendo is audience response direct to the sponsors! 
Our first Seven Arts feature film ran in prime time Friday night. 
By Saturday noon: 

'Special spring plants offered by Nursery Land cleaned out! 

'101 Dalmatian puppies offered by Dairy Mart Farms all happily licking 
listeners' faces in 101 of KOGO's TV homes! 

'889 metal refuse containers featured on San Diego Glass & Paints com- 
mercial sold at retail! 

'Viewer response like this bodes well indeed for exciting results from our 
whole package of Warner's 'Films of the 50's'." 

Warner's Films of the 50's . . . Money makers of the 60's 




SEVEN ARTS 

ASSOCIATED 

CORP. 



NEW YORK: 270 Park Avenue 
CHICAGO: 8922 D La Crosse, Skokie, III. 
DALLAS: 5641 Charlestown Drive 
BEVERLY HILLS: 232 South Reeves Drive 



YUkon 6-1717 

OR 4-5105 

ADams 9-2855 

GRanite 6-1564 



For list of TV stations programming Warner's Films of the 50's see Page One SRDS (Spot TV Rates and Data) 



SIX 

dynamic 




stations 



reach 20 million 
people in 9 states 

with entertainment, education, and 
public service unequalled by any 
broadcaster in the history of the 
industry. Our pride and our 
privilege! 

WLW RADIO 

38th year on the air, consistently ranks 
among the top 10 Radio Stations in 
America! 

WLW TELEVISION 

B&W TV pioneer and now COLOR 
TV leader in the Country! 

WLW-T WLW-D 



Television 
Cincinnati 



Television 
Dayton 



WLW-C WLW-I 



Television 
Columbus 



Television 
Indianapolis 



WLW-A 

Television 
Atlanta 

So when buying Radio or TV time, 
call your WLW Representative. You'll 
be glad you did. 

Crosley Broadcasting Corporation 
a division of Aveo 






^L 




NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



In the wake of the exit of Clifford Barborka, Jr.. from John 
lilair to start his own firm (Better Broadcast Bureau). 
Blair's group plan sales force has been bolstered and ex- 
panded by the addition of three netc men: Jay Hhalen. 
Joseph Knap, and Ralph McDermid. Jr.. all three reporting 
to Blair vice president and sales manager Arthur McCoy. 

The newsmaker: The three men whose appointments tu 

the Blair Group Plan sales force constitutes an important step for- 
ward for spot radio are Jay Whalen, Joseph Knap, and Ralph 
McDermid, Jr. 

Blair executive v. p. Arthur H. McCoy, who revealed the appoint- 
ments this week, called attention to the potency of the group plan. 
Now, stated McCoy, "the entire coast-to-coast coverage of influential 
stations can be bought with one order, one affidavit, one invoice." 

The Group Plan sales unit has 
already had remarkable success in 
developing extensive spot radio 
campaigns for national accounts, 
such as Ac'cent, Beech Nut Coffee, 
Continental Casualty, Dash. Dodge 
trucks, Flako, Marlboro, Mennen, 
MGM, Odorono, Parker Games. 
Philip Morris, Purolator, Scot Tis- 
sue, Tanfastic, United Artists, and 
the Tea Council. 

Whalen comes to Blair from 
Katz Agency. Knap, who joins the 
group plan staff as director of me- ^^ ff McCoy 

dia planning, was with Wesley as- 
sociates. McDermid was most recently an AFN producer. 

Whalen had been with the Katz Agency since 1957. Before that he 
was with Edward Petty and Y&R. No stranger at Blair, Whalen 
began in the broadcast field in 1953 at Blair-TV in the sales sen ice 
department. He is a graduate of Lafayette College and performed 
military service in the Pacific. 

Knap leaves the post of media director at Wesley Associates, where 
he has been since 1952. Previously he was with the Badger-Browning- 
Hersev agency and with Ross Federal. He is a Dartmouth graduate. 

McDermid was a producer for the Armed Forces Network in Eu- 
rope. Before graduating from Northwestern University he was on 
NBC's guest relations staff in New York. 

McCoy referred to the Blair Group Plan as "an important forwaffl 
Btep in effective use of spot radio.'" He emphasized two factors: 
convenience and economy. 

He claimed for the stations represented b) Blair a leading and in- 
fluential role — "measured by listener-acceptance and by sales per- 
formance.' ^ 




SPONSOR 



24 u'Uii. 1901 



QUALITY TELEVISIO 

SELLS 
RICH, RICH 



SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND 




mint Mil li i . i n i n i n -ii 



QUALITY IN THE WOODWORKERS ART IS EXEMPLIFIED BY THIS SALEM EAGLE. FEATURED BY 
DEMING CRAFTSMEN OF CONNECTICUT. OCCUPYING OLD MILL POND VILLAGE IN GRANBY. 
DEMING CRAFTSMEN ATTRACT COUNTLESS VISITORS INTERESTED IN AMERICANA. 

IN RICH. RICH SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND. QUALITY IN TELEVISION IS THE HALLMARK OF 
WTIC-TV. 

OH YES. WTIC-TV PROGRAMS ARE HIGHEST RATED. TOO. 



VV JL JL ^^ ^35^ "^ ** ^^ HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT 

*ASK YOUR HARRINGTON, RIGHTER & PARSONS MAN 




How FOODS 

and DRUGS 

get Extra 
from WSPD Radio- 

Toledo's No. 1 Salesderk 

WSPD in-store-merchandising in 
depth the only program of its 
kind in this $355,103,000* mar- 
ket for food products-sells 
foods! Sells drugs! Supports and 
extends the terrific sales impact 
of advertising on Toledo's dom- 
inant station . . . Converts more 
listeners into buyers. 

Ask your Katz Representative for the 
latest eye-opening Pulse figures and 
complete details on WSPD's mer- 
chandising program. He'll help you 
select the most persuasive time for 
your product. 

"Annuo/ food soles in 
WSPD's circulation orc-o 

WSPD-Radio 

# NBC -TOLEDO 
a STORER station 

National Sales Offices 

625 Madison Ave., N.Y. 22 
230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1 




by John E. McMillin 

Commercial 
commentary 

Pitchers still ahead of the hitters? 

Next week (Thursday. 4 Ma\ l at the Hotel 
Roosevelt in New York, Wally Ross is statin" 
the Second Annual Tv Commercials Festival, 
and I wonder if your reactions to the 10-odd 
award winners will he the same as mine. 

Since mid-March the Festival Council (nearly 
all working pros from top agency and adver- 
tiser shops and only a few of us ringers) has 
been sweating through an arduous series of judging sessions at 
TVAR's screening room and the Johnin \ ictoi Theatre. 

It has been an exhausting experience trying to rate the 1352 en- 
tries (25 more than last year) and far from an easy job. 

But Fm sure I speak for most of the 82 Festival judges in telling 
you that it has also been a tremendous privilege — a fascinating addi- 
tion to our own store of advertising knowledge. 

What you will see during the day long Festival at the Roosevelt 
will be the commercials we selected as winners and runners up in 
about 35 product categories (beer, gasoline, cigarettes, etc.) phi- a 
few honorable mentions, plus certain "craft" awards (for best mu- 
sic animation, use of tv tape, etc.) plus a reel of "Commercial 
Classics" which we feel deserve permanent and eternal enshrinement. 

Altogether it's a good show. And I hope you can attend not mere- 
ly the Festival luncheon when the top winners are announced, but 
the more complete screenings throughout the day. 

For, however pleasant (and human I it may be to thrill at copping 
a blue ribbon the actual winners of a Tv Commercials Festival are 
easily its least important feature. 

Far more significant is the fact that these Festivals are providing 
the industry with its first complete, representative and professionally 
selected exhibits of current tv advertising work, a library of com- 
mercials that thoughtful admen will be using more and more often. 

During the past year, for instance, selected reels from the 1960 
Festival were given 125 separate screenings before leading agencies, 
advertisers, ad clubs, associations and schools. 

This year's 250 finalists will receive even more extensive atten- 
tion. Last week, Al Hollender of Grey Advertising screened a hand- 
picked selection of 1961 entries before the AAAA meeting at White 
Sulphur Springs. Many other dates, including showings to AN V 
AFA, and NAB groups have already been arranged. 

You've got to study 'em 

The one, clearest impression I've derived from my own experi- 
ence as a Festival judge is that to get the real benefit of these tv 
commercials, you've got to spend time seeing, studying and thinking 
about them. 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 







Then, perhaps, certain patterns, trends, and lessons will begin to 
emerge for you. For me, the 1961 entries provided food for thought 
along these lines: 

1) Similarity in product groups. If you look at the commercials 
in one of the larger product groups — beer, or gasoline, for example, 
you'll discover an almost alarming similarity between the techniques 
and messages used by different companies within the same industry. 

I am certain that when one soap commercial looks like another 
soap commercial both soap companies are losing out; when one 
gasoline spot employs exactly the same camera angles and sequences 
as a competitive gasoline spot, both oil companies are failing to jid 
maximum advertising effectiveness. 

Yet this is true of many categories in the 1961 Festival, and I 
think it should be the subject for emergency plans board meetings at 
a number of top agencies. 

2) Badly planned long commercials. Many of the most elaborate 
and expensive spots submitted for the 1961 Festival were those 
which ran two or more minutes. 

I was startled to realize that most agency copywriters haven't yet 
mastered the longer-than-one-minute length. Their out-size commer- 
cials lack form and structure, and tend to be mere additions of extra 
products and salespoints, rather than coherent sales messages. 

Techniques still ahead of selling 

The most important single conclusion I derived from the 1961 
Festival entries, however, was this: 

3) Commercial techniques are still ahead of selling power. The 
technical slickness and finesse in execution of many modern com- 
mercials are wonderful things to see (and well worth attending the 
Festival for this reason alone.) 

But the well-thought-out selling line, the carefully planned con- 
centration of hard-hitting copy power is sadly lacking in many other- 
wise excellent commercial presentations. 

To borrow a baseball phrase, the pitchers seem still ahead of the 
hitters. 

In the early days of tv, the show-business pitchman-type of com- 
mercial all but drowned out solid advertising strategy and craft 
(remember those dreadful Texaco commercials on the Berle show?). 

More recently, there's been a lessening of the influence of the 
"What Broadway and Hollywood think a sales pitch ought to look 
like" school of commercial techniques. But, after seeing the 1961 
Festival entries I still believe the advertising business has a long 
way to go. 

Too many of these commercials are distinguished by beautiful 
camera work, clever opticals, catchy music, — and a complete lack 
of real advertising brains and imagination. 

Or at least, so it seems to mp. 

But don't get me wrong. The Festival itself is one of the most 
important and profitable ways in which any advertising man can 
spend three or four hours of thoughtful study about our business. 

Get to the Roosevelt by all means if you possibly can. You will 
see some truly dazzling examples of modern tv selling, some very 
beautiful spots, some very amusing ones, and you will learn more 
about the complete spectrum of tv advertising than you can learn at 
any other one place. 

You may even pick up some ideas for new business pitches! ^ 









THIS IS WHAT THE 

MICHIGAN 
MARKET 

IS RUU Y LIKV. 



LANSING and 
MID-MICHIGAN 



m&& 



OUTSIDE DETROIT 



WILX-TV COVERAGE 

LOW COST 

PER THOUSAND 



TRAVERSE CITY 




FLINT-SAGINAW 
BAY CITY MARKET 



GRAND RAPIDS 

KALAMAZOO 

MARKET 



LANSING' \ 

AND MID-* \ 
MICHIGAN \ 
MARKET •"""-TV 




WILX-TV FACTS 



• STUDIOS IN 
LANSING 
JACKSON 
BATTLE CREEK 



• FULL TIME. NBC 

• TOWER HT. 1008' 

• POWER 
316,000 WATTS 



Represented by 

VENARD, RINT0UL& McCONNEL, INC. 

THE GOLDEN TRIANGLE STATION 

L~l 



U l_J 

Associated with 

WILS - LANSING / WP0N - PONTIAC 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 








Ycs-you are missing from $92,000,000 to $120,000,000 in family purchasing 
power each week if your television advertising is not on the CBS Televi- 
sion Network. You're missing it because week after week this season the 
average nighttime program on our network is delivering 3/4 million more 
families than on Network Y- one million more families than on Network/? 




CHS Television Network® 



• \ .1 ..,,.:. i. \ i, :■, m -. ,i...n V A a\ci ges < >< < I960 Mai 1961 6 I I pro 
.t\ week I) household expenditures $ll " < 1959 >i s Depl "i < ommcra 



Women Are Wonderful. 

Ann Colone's a Woman. 
Ann Colone's Wonderful. 

If there's a misogynist in the house, our 
authority for the major premise, Women Are 
Wonderful, is TV Radio Mirror, which made 
the comment while giving WANE-TV's Ann 
Colone its gold medal award for "Best TV 
Women's Interest Show— Midwest States." 

The minor premise (minor only in formal 
logic terms) is axiomatic. Ann's a most at- 
tractive, vivacious, witty and entertaining lady. 

The conclusion, shared by viewers, visitors 
and vendors alike, is inescapable. She's won- 
derful in providing everything from exercise 
gymnastics to festive cooking hints, from para- 
keet keepers to parachute jumpers, from the 
Dukes of Dixieland (in person) to the Chief 
of the Congolese Lunda tribe (in person). 
And there's always time to discuss and help 
community activities. 

The Ann Colone Show is one-o'clock watch- 
ing five days a week for large numbers of the 
ladies of Fort Wayne and vicinity, reaching 
about 60% and 100% more homes, respec- 
tively, than competing network programs; 
adult ladies comprise 74% of its audience. 

All Corinthian stations create programs 
which, like the Ann Colone Show, meet local 
and regional tastes. This encourages local 
talent, builds viewer respect and helps make 
friendly prospects for advertisers. 




Responsibility in Broadcasting 



1U 



12 



SPONSOR 



24 \pril 1961 




-jzy 





i 



KOTV 

Tulsa 

KHOU-TV 

Houston 

KXTV . 

Sacramento 

WANE-TV 

Fort Wayne 

WISH-TV 

Indianapolis 

WANE-AM 

Fort Wayne 

WISH-AM 

Indianapolis 

'presented by H-R 



sponsor • 24 APRIL 1961 




Reps at work 




Michael E. Schwartz, account executive, Daren F. McGavren Co., 
New York, points out, "When there is a call for availabilities asking 
for specific times such as housewife (9 a.m.-4 p.m.) or traffic, it is 
the responsibility of a representative to call to the attention of the 
buyer individual market habits which may make it advisable to con- 
sider other times. Some of the 
most efficient buys are made in 
other than accepted times. Just a 
simple check of homes using radio 
in different markets may be a 
guide to the market's habits. Some 
markets show a radical drop in 
afternoon traffic times. Some mar- 
kets have a high H. U. R. on Sat- 
urday afternoons while others 
drop appreciably. Take for ex- 
ample, Los Angeles. The third 
biggest shopping day is Sunday. 
In Akron, Ohio, one of the rubber shifts is between 11:30-12 mid- 
night, and 5-6 a.m., and that time may be bought efficiently for a 
male audience. In Honolulu, offices are in full swing by 8 a.m. 
which means that the male audience comp. drops appreciably be- 
tween 8-9 a.m. It is just as important that a buyer take a flexible 
position on the question of best times. 

Robert Lobdell, mgr., Adam Young, Chicago, attributes an apparent 
philosophy of 'wait and hurry up' to agency media departments. "It 
almost never is the buyer's fault," says Lobdell, "but somehow, after 
almost interminable delays in setting up a schedule, the whistle blows 
and the buyer has two days in which to purchase complicated schedules 

on one, two or three stations in 65 
markets. The midnight oil is bro- 
ken out, and for the next 48 hours, 
almost literally night and day, the 
buyer is immersed in rate cards, 
program sheets and rating books. 
He hasn't enough time to eat, let 
alone see a media salesman with 
important, last minute changes. 
Why this has to be, I don't know, 
but I do know that no one can buy 
with maximum efficiency under 
such conditions. Buyers today are 
extremely well trained and highly professional people. Between ac- 
tual buying periods for an account, they make careful preparations. 
They listen to reps, study research findings, and weigh evidence care- 
fully. It is unfortunate that so often they are so rushed during buy- 
ing, they haven't sufficient opportunity to utilize all background facts. 



13 




49th and 
Madison 



'Bedside Network' impressive 

Headers of sponsor, here at William 
Esty, are calling and saying how im- 
pressed they are with the picture- 
story of the "Bedside Network" in 
your 10 April issue. 

This, of course, is exactly the reac- 
tion we hoped for, as it may very 
well result in greater participation of 
ad agency people in our activities. 

I think you did a beautiful job in 
presenting the workings of our or- 
ganization, and I thank you again 
for your kind assistance. 

Dick Foorman 

public information committee 

Veterans Hospital Radio and 

Television Guild 

N. Y. C. 



SAG-AFTRA excellent series 

Thank you for your cooperation w ith 
Mr. Irving Lewis of our office in pro- 
viding him with copies of SPONSOR 
magazine containing your excellent 
series of SAG-AFTRA articles. 

We have not decided as yet to re- 
produce and circulate these articles 
among our members, but have made 
them available to each member of 
our Board. We have, of course, given 
full credit to SPONSOR magazine as 
the source, and have made no de- 
letions or alterations in the copy. 

Kenneth Groot 

executive secretary 

American Federation of Tv 

and Radio Artists 

N. Y. C. 




NO, THIS 15 KNOE-LAND 



(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1,520.100 Drug Sales $ 40,355.000 

Households 423,600 Vutoraotive Sales S 299,539,000 

( onsumer Spendable Income General Merchandise S I is. 789,000 

|1,761, 169,000 total Retail Sales $1,286,255,000 
Food Sales "0,486.000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 71% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to November, 1960 ARB we average 71"-. share of audience from 
9 a.m. to midnight, 7 days a week. 



KNOE-TV 

(hannel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 

["he only commercial TV siation licensed to 



CBS • ABC 

A James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 



Monroe. 



Photo: The Magnolia Trailer Manufacturing Company, Vicksburg, Mississippi. 



'A good letter, but . . .' 

It was a good letter, but it appears to 
be a few weeks late. I'm referring to 
Verl Thompson's letter (sponsor, 27 
March I suggesting the need for time 
limitations on the number of com- 
mercial time in announcement t\pe 
programs. 

In January the NAB Radio Code 
Board adopted standards calling Eol 
an average maximum of 14 minutes 
of commercial time per hour, com- 
puted over a week, and a maximum 
of 18 minutes in any single hour. 
This action was ratified by the Radio 
Board of Directors in February. The 
new limitations will take effect 1 
May. 

Incidentally, apparently there was 
a typo in Thompsons title. Leroy 
Collins is still president of NAB. 

Cliff Gill 

pres. & gen. mgft 

K-EZY 

Anaheim. Calif. 



Warm thank you 

From our entire group a warm thank 
vou for a well written report and 
story, i "How to Challenge Big N.Y. 
Agencies." in your 20 March issue). 
Leo Greenland 
president 
Smith/Greenland 
Company Inc. 
\.Y.C. 



Fashion coverage pleasing 

This is a belated "thank you." How- 
ever, I just saw the story and pic- 
ture on the Hess Fashion Telecast, 3 
April sponsor, and want to let you 
know how very pleased we are with 
your coverage. 

Again, many thanks for your kind 
cooperation. 

Audry Gellis 
Bert Nevins, Inc. 
N. Y. C. 



Thank you for sending me the SPON- 
SOR magazine and I think your story, 
"Tv takes the fashion world by 
storm," is excellent. 

Edrie Van Dore 

public relations director 

Macy's 

N. Y. C. 



14 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 




For meritorious locally-produced Radio-TV programming 





A SUBSIDIARY OF TIME INC. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. WOOD-TV— NBC for Western and 
Central Michigan: Grand Rapids, Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Muskegon 
and Lansing. WOOD-Radio — NBC. Represented by the Katz Agency. 



WGALTV^ r 



College of the Air 

Now in its eighth consecutive year, this 
tri-weekly adult-level educational series is 
designed for classroom use in senior high 
schools, in colleges, and for home-viewing. 
Through close cooperation with eight col- 
leges in the Channel 8 coverage area, 
WGAL-TV offers alert, diversified program- 
ming. College of the Air is just one phase of 
this station's many public service activities. 




Lancaster, Pa. • NBC and CBS 




STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 




Representative: The MEEKER Company, Inc. 

New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 



16 



SPONSOR • 2 J APRIL 196 



Interpretation and commentary 
on most significant tv/ 'radio 
and marketing news of the week 



SPONSOR -SCOPE 



24 APRIL 1961 
c*mrl|ht ihi 

SPONMR 
PUBLICATION* IIIO. 



Chalk up Lever as the source for the biggest breakthrough yet for public serv- 
ice tv progaming out of the package goods field. 

As the coming season unrolls look for Lever to attach its name and commercials to quite 
a number of public affairs network programs. 

Scotch any idea you may have at this point that the giant packager is bent on image- 
building primarily. That's not the case. What primarily has motivated this major client 
toward the sponsorship of all this public affairs fare — in wholesale lots likely — is this: 

• It has found that because of the imitativeness and quality of the bulk of regularly sched- 
uled fare, tv has lost the habitual attention of people in the higher income, profession- 
al and intelligence levels. 

• If a huge section of this class, say 10 million people, are to be reached through tv, it 
would be wise to offer them a special type of programing, particularly one dealing with 
stimulating treatment of the events of the time. 

• Such a level of programing can be made to pay out in terms of efficiency since it can 
be bought from the networks on a pretty reasonable basis. 

P&G has been sponsoring public affairs programs because it needed the allowable two- 
minute breaks for its exceptionally long Crest commercials, but Lever will be using the es- 
tablished commercial-break pattern for its public affairs shows and assign them a variety 
of products. 



Even though the Four A's and the ANA last week joined several prominent 
agencies in the call to arms against the extension of station-break time, ABC TV is 
showing no signs of retreating from this position: 

These same agencies signed fall contracts with this 40-second station-break stipulation 
included. The matter is a closed book as far as ABC TV is concerned. Nothing will stop 
the policy from going into effect this fall. 

Madison Ave. sophisticates look for verbal pyrotechnics activated by CBS TV's notice it 
would have no choice but to grant 42-second breaks to its own affiliates to continue a while 
longer, but they can't see the networks getting out of this particular bind unless some- 
body institutes injunction proceedings. 

One of these Madison Avenueites wondered out loud whether it had been wise for the 
protesting agencies to expose their irk in the news columns — particularly on the grounds 
of overcommercialization. Noted this observer: "Chickens such as these often have a way of 
coming home to roost." 

(For more details, see SPONSOR-WEEK, page 27.) 



Spot tv's prospects with Ford come the last 1961 quarter is a record outlay of 
dollars for local entertainment, news and sports programs and announcements. 

The die for expenditures by the company for the 1962 models has been pretty well set, 
but the stations will have to reconcile themselves to this: the Ford keynote will be the ul- 
timate in flexibility and it will expect the media to make it as easy and as efficient as pos- 
sible to saturate and to dart in and out of. 

Ford's commitments on network shape up as follows : A quarter of the National 
Professional Football games ($2,800,000) ; a half -hour of Wagon Train ($7 million, if it goes 
52 weeks) ; the Hazel series, also NBC TV ($4.5 million for 39 weeks) ; four Ernie Ford spe- 
cials ($1.5 million). 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



17 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 






Probably the hottest product in the toiletries field at the moment is Lanolin 
Plus' Color Plus, a nail polish that keeps 'em from breaking. The efforts of com- 
petitors to catch up will likely prove to air media's advantage. 

Reports have it that the Lanolin Plus innovation — Mort Adell, the president, paid $4 mil- 
lion for the patent — caught Revlon, the kingpin of the nail polishes, off base, and gave 
Lanolin Plus the solid store wedge it's been looking for. 



Y&R's got a special spring-summer budget for daytime tv from General Ele 
trie's big appliance division to sell refrigerators. 

The bundle amounts to around $100,000. It hasn't been disclosed whether it will go 
to spot or network. 



c- 



Jt looks like Ralston will confine its tv expenditures on pet foods to spot. 

The reason is a simple marketing one. It's in the cities that the vast bulk of the pet foods 
are sold and where pet owners have a greater disposition to buy their pets the packaged ar- 



ticle instead of feeding them from the table. 



There's an interesting sidelight to the market test being conducted by P&G in 
connection with its two cooking oils, Crisco and Puritan. 

It's trying to find out whether an established name carries an advantage over an 
unknown name when it comes to a new product. 

(For an in-depth roundup of the anti-cholesterol cooking products situation, in which 
these two brands figure, see article on page 33.) 

For the second time within a month spot buying practices connected with the 
Liggett & Myers account have stirred a peeve among some station reps. 

The latest: McCann-Erickson's placing of business for Chesterfield and Oasis on a pre- 
evaluated basis and without giving reps in the same markets a chance to tell their com- 
petitive story. 

These reps admit that nothing is so disconcerting to them as getting a query from their 
own stations as to why they weren't aware that a piece of business was being placed in that 
market. 

You can understand why hep media people consider late fringe tv time as a 
> ear-around good buy when you look at a three-season comparison of the average 
ratings obtainable in that area in summer as against winter. 

The drop in audience from winter to summer in fringe time runs only 12-13%, where- 
as the dropoff in prime evening time figures 25-30%. 

What happens to that fringe viewing in the summer is obvious. Generally speaking, the 
viewing of prime time programing starts much later in the summer than in the winter. 
Also, people tend to stay up longer in the summer, particularly those attentive to night base- 
ball games. 

Of course, there's the comparative rate factor: a prime 20 costs around 15% more 
than a fringe minute and gets a larger audience, but in a fringe minute you get three times 
the length of a prime message. 

Following is a Nielsen comparison of average fringe time ratings over the past three 
seasons. 

1958-59 1959-60 1960-61 

TIME SPAN SUMMER WINTER SUMMER WINTER SUMMER WINTER 

11-12 Midnight 27.1 31.3 26.2 29.9 26.8 31.1 

12 M-l a.m. 14.4 17.1 14.0 16.7 14.9 17.2 



18 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The feud between NBC TV and Lever last week reached the point of no return, 
at least for the 1961-62 season. Lever pulled away what may have amounted to 
$8-9 million in nighttime billings. 

There's a possibility of the same thing happening to Lever's $3-4 million in day- 
time business, that is, if the right spots can be found on ABC TV and CBS TV. 

The issue that eventuated in the breakaway : NBC TV's refusal to assure Lever that 
it had a franchise position in any particular position. As Lever saw it, the network 
arrogated to itself the right to move any Lever show, if it proved successful, to another period, 
if this transfer served to help build a particular NBC TV night. 

The sequence of events that led up to the issue showdown: (1) NBC TV moved 
the Price Is Right from Wednesday to Monday night and insisted Lever share the show 
with an alternate advertiser (Lorillard) ; (2) NBC TV installed its own show, Joey Bishop, 
in that vacated Wednesday 8:30 period and stipulated that if Lever wanted to remain there 
it would have to share Bishop with American Tobacco; (3) Lever argued that its occu- 
pancy of the Wednesday period for four years should protect it against confiscation of half 
the time, but to no avail. 

Incidentally, some weeks ago American Tobacco protested vigorously against its be- 
ing ousted from Bonanza so that NBC TV could deliver the western exclusively to Chevrolet 
for the Sunday 9-10 p.m. period starting this fall. 

P.S.: Ogilvy was Lever agency of record for that Wednesday night period. 

Foods continue to outpace drugs, cigarettes and soaps-toiletries in the use of 
nighttime network tv spot carriers. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE's breakdown of spot carrier customers in terms of total commercial 
minutes by classification for the second 1961 quarter: 






CATEGORY 


ABC TV 


CBS TV 


NBC TV 


TOTAL 


Foods, beverages, candy 


19 


7 


12 


38 


Drugs 


16 


7 


4 


27 


Cigarettes 


18 


4 


4 


26 


Soaps-toiletries, cosmetics 


9 


6 


10 


25 


Cleansing agents, chemicals 


9 


4 


6 


19 


Autos, other hard goods 


9 





3 


12 


Miscellaneous 


1 


2 


3 


6 


Total 


81 


30 


42 


153 



What could turn out to be the biggest programing money loser for the 1961- 
62 season — even exceeding public affairs — are the live network sports events. 

Admen who have made a specialty of this type of tv fare express amazement at the 
prices being paid for rights — the result of the most fervid bidding yet. 

The beneficiaries of all this, of course, are the owners of the rights, who have no com- 
punction, what with three stiff bidders now in the ring, about hiking up their demands 
with each succeeding season. 

What these admen foresee: many of the events going at distress prices at the last minute. 

Judging from intimations made to some agencies by the network, ABC TV is 
contemplating another move toward gaining recognition as a newscasting force. 

The latest proposal: a 6:15-6:30 strip, Monday through Friday. 

Advantages to ABC TV affiliates: (1) getting in there with a national news roundup be- 
fore the other networks; (2) affording themselves 45 minutes of children's programing 
prior to the news, instead of a half-hour; (3) using the 5 to 6:15 span for a feature film, if 
preferred; (4) garnering added value for local sale of the 6:30-7 p.m. period. 



24 april 1961 



19 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Lestoil (Jackson) is giving extended and deep consideration to that pitch anei 
moving over to daytime network tv and on a regional basis. 

The basic self-searching: does it want to give up those valuable spot franchises? 
It's estimated that Lestoil's spot commitments are now running at the rate of $5-6 mil- 
lion. At its peak the cleanser was spending $9-10 million a year. 

TvB's research stalwarts are involving themselves in an area that's been the re- 
cipient of a lot of questioning on the part of agency reesarchers lately. 

The question is this: just what is the attention level of the viewing audience, both 
day and night? To wit, even if the set is on, what percentage of the time have they got 
their eyes and ears glued to what's going on? 

Finding a solution to this problem is in the planning stage. The next step at TvB will 
be to do a pilot study. 

Du Font's anti-freeze division (BBDO) will take two or three more weeks to 
complete its air media buying plans for the 1961-62 season. 

Last year it had its network nighttime participation buys all wrapped up in April, but 
this time Prestone (Esty) got its licks in first. 

Explained a du Pont ad contact: "We're just taking more time with our planning. 
There's no other reason." 

The report persists that du Pont has further ideas of chopping up its account. 

Where spot figures to benefit as business recovery takes on momentum: some 
agency marketingmen are predicting that lots of manufacturers will put a lot of accent on 
both price and price reduction via local advertising. 

Consumers are expected to respond to this strategem with wholesale easing of the purse 
strings. 

It seems to be the consensus among important buyers of tv for the youngest 
viewing generation that the networks in the near future will find the kid market 
a-cropper. 

The core of their reasoning is this: the local stripe of kid show, despite rising prices, has 
a huge edge over network in that the local show offers an m.c. who's not only closely ori- 
ented to the local audience but does a good job of selling. 

Another advantage these top buyers cite: the flexibility of programing by the local 
stations. 

However, some of the buyers think the local managements are overlooking two fac- 
tors: (1) the generation turnover in this age bracket is more rapid than any other; (2) 
youngsters favor repetition of the same screen fare. Stations are making the error of 
scheduling new material when it's actually not necessary. 

Research services report that more and more advertisers who use spot tv only 
for the introduction of a new product are having this type of job done: 

1) Before putting the campaign on the air, asking, say, 500 contacts in, say, five mar- 
kets what brands they are aware of in the product field involved. 

2) A week after the spot campaign has been completed, posing the same question to as 
many of the same 500 as possible. 

Patent objective: getting a measure of the campaign's effectiveness. 



For other news coverage in this issue: see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 

Sponsor-Week, page 23; Sponsor Week Wrap-Up, page 54; Washington Week, page 61; 
SPONSOR Hears, page 64; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 69; and Film-Scope, page 62. 



20 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



employment, manufacturing, retailing, housing, 
and government payrolls show — 



« 



DAYTON, OHIO IS DIFFERENT!" 




Brig. General E. J. Hopkins, Comp- 
troller, Wright-Patterson Air Force 

Base — "last year the Wright-Pat- 
terson — Dayton Depot Complex 
employed 29,000 with a payroll of 
$190,000,000, making us the largest 
employer in the Dayton area. Fore- 
casts for '61 indicate the possibility 
of increased expenditures. The con- 
stant purchasing power of local Air 
Force personnel is a stabilizing in- 
fluence on the Dayton economy." 



David L. Rike, President, Rike- 
Kumler Company, Vice President and 
Director, Federated Department 
Stores, Inc. — "We worked hard to get 
an increase in 1960, and we're more 
than holding our own in '61. The re- 
tail picture is good. Consumer de- 
mand has held steady. Local savings 
accounts are at a record high. Home 
sales are improving. 



Dr. E. B. O'Leary, Chairman, Eco- 
nomics Department, University of 
Dayton — "The Dayton economy has 
held up better than most because 
of the make-up of local industry. 
They're diversified . . . international 
. . . aggressive . . . leaders in their 
fields. Rather than pulling in their 
horns, they have become more in- 
ventive and aggressive during the 
recent slump." 



It's true. Dayton is different. Things are happening 
in Dayton. Daytonians are working. Daytonians are 
buying. And, there's an easy way to reach them. 
There are 543,057* TV homes in the WHIO-TV 
area**. It's Ohio's 3rd and the nation's 34th market. 
543,057 families in a buying mood. 
Shouldn't you be selling this vital, prosperous 
market? Now? On WHIO-TV-AM-FM? 



Check with George P. Hollingbery 
for additional data on WHIO-TV, 
WHIO-AM and WHIO-FM, Dayton's 
High, Wide, and Wholesome Power 
and Programming. 



*total area households, 601,060 (SRD, 1-1-61) average TV penetration, 
90.35% (Nielsen Survey, Spring, 1959) 
**area attributed to WHIO-TV (Nielsen 3rd Survey) 

Associated with 

WSB, WSB-TV, Atlanta, Georgia and 

WSOC, WSOC-TV, Charlotte, North Carolina 




SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



21 




$28,431 in family spending power* comes 
with every dollar you spend on Network Z. 




$31,824 in family spending power* comes 
with every dollar you spend on Network Y. 



1^^^^^=^ 




$34,515 in family spending power* comes 
with every dollar you spend on ABC-TV. 



Want more of that weekly U.S. spending money for your client? 

Then figure spending his television money according to these 

figures: 

ABC's current CPM is $3.39. Net Y, $3.67. Net Z, 14.12. 

Meaning ABC delivers 295 homes per dollar per commercial 



minute. Net Y, 272 homes. Net Z, 243 homes. 
Meaning $100,000 a week spent on ABC gets you 2,300,0C 
more sales demonstrations than you get on Net Y, 5,200,0G. 
more than you get on Net Z. Meaning spend where the spendii:| 
— and trending — is most profitable. ADQ TgIgVISIO 



'Source: Av. weekly household expenditures: $117 (1959, U.S. Dept. of Commerce), multiplied by homes reached per dollar ptfr commercial minute. National Nielsen TV Index estlnwB 
TV cost per thousand commercial minutes. 4 weeks ending Feb. 5, 1961. Average evening once weekly program. Estimated time and published talent costs. 




I 24 April 1961 



Latest tv and 
radio developments of 
the week, briefed 
for busy readers 



SPONSOR-WEEK 



^ GM's summer daytime tv for Chevy, Buick, and Pontiac 
^ NBC TV sells $4.7 million participations in Today/Paar 
* The Stanton Peabody: "Not a reward — but a reminder" 



AFFILIATES BACK ABC TV'S 40 BREAK 



ABC affiliates have launched a verbal counter-attack 
in reply to agency criticism of ABC TV's proposed 40- 
second chainbreak. 

Howard W. Maschmeier, chairman of the board of 
governors of the ABC TV affiliates association, made a 
statement which solidly defended the 40 second plan. 

The expanded break is a "purely business" matter, 
one which, within the ABC family, is "the number one 
continuing item of affiliate interest," stated Maschmeier. 

The affiliate spokesman, who is also general manager 
of WNHC-TV, New Haven, suggested that station eco- 
nomics was primarily an internal affair. 

In response to charges of "overcommercialization," 
he asserted that the new chainbreaks would still not 
contain more than two commercial announcements, no 
more than current practice. 

Besides the economic defense of the 40-second plan, 
he voiced the affiliates' moral position, asserting the 
new break would remain within both the letter and 
spirit of the NAB Code. 

ABC TV's announcement that it would expand station 
breaks in nighttime programs from 30 to 40 seconds in 
the fall had produced a series of stormy reactions with 
agencies attacking ABC TV and another network coming 
to its support. 

ABC TV announced its new policy on 1 February. CBS 
TV stated on 7 April that it would follow suit if any com- 
peting network enlarged its station breaks. Agency 
protests came from George H. Gribbin, Y&R president, 
on 13 April complaining to both ABC TV and CBS TV 
and also urging NBC TV, which had not made any 
change in the area public, not to accept the new policy. 
(Continued on next page) 



HUMBLE OIL PUTS $700,000 IN 
TV SPOT, RADIO NEWS b SPOT 

(Chicago): One of the midwest's most comprehensive 
tv/radio spot campaigns is coming out of Humble Oil 
(NL&B). 

Running 14 weeks starting 24 April, the campaign 
estimated by SPONSOR to be worth $700,000 will cover 
Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa. 

Besides 1,776 prime time tv spots, there'll be 301 five- 
minute radio newscasts and 4,500 radio minutes. Cam- 
paign will also be heavy in newspapers. 

Brand is Oklahoma Gas. 

4-A's public relations efforts to ease 
irritation over tv/radio advertising 

(White Sulphur Springs, W. Va.): The 4-A's will embark 
on a public relations campaign through its counsel, Hill 
and Knowlton, to improve advertising's own image. 

The campaign will be aimed at that segment of the 
public which finds tv advertising — and to a lesser extent 
radio advertising — to be irritating. 

The two objectives are: to make better known adver- 
tising's ethical standards and its responsibility to the 
public. Surveys reveal that the public knows little of 
the AAAA Copy Code or the AAAAA-ANA Interchange Ob- 
jectionable Advertising. 

John G. Mapes of Hill and Knowlton reveals some of 
the positive measures: a new magazine, Advertising To- 
day, starting in September, a Pilot University Seminar, 
plus studies, factual material, and lecturers. 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



23 



■■■D 



HOMES REACHED BY WAVY-TV PROGRAMMING 



10:30-12 Midnight 
Saturday 

"THE BIG MOVIE" 



165% i 



ncrease 



9:15-9:30 A.M. 
Mon. - Fri. 

MEET MARILYN" 

10 /O increase 



6:00-7:00 P.M. 
Saturday 

"Peninsula Playhouse" 

I /O increase 



7:00-7:30 P.M. 
Mon. - Fri. 

Various 



34% i 



ncrease 




1:00-2:00 P.M. 
Mon. - Fri. 

'DIALING FOR DOLLARS" 



'0 increase 



The latest ARB shows these 
remarkable increases in homes 
reached. Tidewater, Virginia is 
growing and so is WAVY-TV's aud- 
ience. If you're interested in reaching 
more homes in the greatest concentration 
of people in the entire Southeast, write, wire 
or call for availabilities. 






idewater^rirginia 



11:00-11:15 P.M. 
Sot. - Sun. 

"LATE NEWS" 



81% i 



ncrease 




Serving Norfolk, Portsmouth, Newport News and 49 Counties in Virginia, North Carolina and Maryland 

24 SPONSOR • 21 AI'KIL 1961 



24 April 1961/SP0NS0R-WEEK 



CM INTO NBC TV DAYTIME 

General Motors' biggest daytime expenditure to date 
is set for 13 weeks starting 1 July on NBC TV in four 
weekday shows. 

Orders for passenger cars are through Campbell- 
Ewald, McCann-Erickson, and D. P. Brother. 



14 SPEND $4.7 MILLION IN 
NBCS GARROWAY, PAAR SHOWS 

Fourteen advertisers placed orders worth $4,750,000 
n the past six weeks in NBC TV's Dave Garroway Today 
Show and Jack Paar Show. 

Biggest are S&H Green Stamps (SSC&B) in Garroway 
for 260 participations, Miles Labs (Wade) in Garroway 
for 80, P. Lorillard (L&N) in Paar for 49, and Gold Seal 
[Campbell-Mithun) in Paar for 40. 



[Continued from previous page) 

Y&R protested against the change as "arbitrary" and 
as tending toward "over-commercialization." Treyz of 
ABC TV replied to Gribbin, defending the proposed 
"broadened and stronger economic base for the sta- 
tion," and pointing out extra station revenue Could be 
used "to help finance improved television service in the 
public interest." 

A 40 second break (CBS TV speaks of 42 seconds) 
would enable stations to sell two 20-second spots in- 
stead of one 20-second and one ID during chainbreaks. 
A consequence of the new policy is that network affili- 
ates would greatly increase revenue from direct sales of 
chainbreaks. This would come just after a period dur- 
ing which station income from its share of network pro- 
gram revenues has been declining. Hence ABC TV, ac- 
cording to trade observers, is resetting its economic re- 
lations with its affiliates, extending local independence. 

CBS TV's endorsement of ABC TV's position indicates 
that other networks would follow ABC TV's proposals to 
prevent it from having an advantage in its affiliate rela- 
tions. Since ABC TV is firmly committed to its new 
policy, imitations by other networks, despite stiff pro- 
tests by agencies and advertisers, are regarded as in- 
evitable in some circles. 

If most or all of the networks go to 40 second chain- 
breaks, a permanent change in network-affiliate rela 
tions could result. Insiders see the networks as victims 
of economic necessity, making concessions to affiliates 
despite a barrage of moral disapprovals by agencies. 



AMA goes fm to fight Kennedy measure 

(Milwaukee): The American Medical Association has 
turned to fm saturation as an arm for its opposition to 
the Administration's old age medical care bills. 

The buy covers 40 top markets, part spot and part 
WQXR network, and is scheduled for five weeks. 

The AMA's commercials, devised to reach what it 
terms thought leaders, solicits support for the Kerr- 
Mills bill as against the administration's King bill. 

This is the first time the AMA has launched a paid 
radio campaign since 1948, when it used the medium to 
fight another bill then before Congress. 

Klau-Van-Pietersom-Dunlap is the agency. 



Finalists picked in three hottest races 
for 4 May Tv Commercials Festival honors 

Hottest contests in the 1961 American Tv Commer- 
cials Festival are among the pharmaceuticals, coffee 
and teas, and cosmetics and toiletries, according to 
Wallace A. Ross, festival director. 

Top prize at the 4 May, Roosevelt Hotel, luncheon 
will be awarded to "one of several surprisingly good 
and tasteful commercials in the delicate and oft-criti- 
cized pharmaceutical category." 

Front runners: Bufferin's "headache-heartbeat" spot 
(Y&R — On Film); Johnson & Johnson's First Aid Cream 
(Y&R— On Film); Vicks Vapo-Rub (Morse Int.— On Film); 
Carters Little Pills "hourglass" spot (Bates — Filmex); 
Allcrest (Papert, K&L— EUE); Alka Seltzer (Wade— 
Swift-Chaplin); Metrecal (K&E— Filmways). 

The coffee and tea category winner will come from 
this group: Maxwell House (OBM — Tv Graphics); Instant 
Maxwell House (B&B— Tv Graphics); Yuban (B&B— Tv 
Graphics); Nestea (McCann — EUE); Columbian Coffee 
(DDB— MPO). 

Ban (OBM— WCD Productions) and Five Day Deodor- 
ant Pads (DDB — EUE) are good guesses in the cos- 
metics and toiletries category, crowded very closely by 
several excellent hair and bath soap commercials. 

Videotape production awards are tightly contested. 
Standouts are: CBS TV's Revlon spot for W&L; NBC 
Telesales Corvair spot for C-E, and an ABC TV Ernie 
Kovacs-Dutch Masters commercial for EWR&R. Stations 
which may be honored are KTTV, Los Angeles (Tree Wax 
—Tildes & Cantz); KTLA, Los Angeles (Lytton Savings 
Bank— direct); KSL, Salt Lake City, and KCRA, Sacra- 
mento, for other local spots. Videotape Productions and 
NTA Telestudios have about a half-dozen entries each in 
the finals of the regular tape production categories. 

Director Ross revealed that last year's crowd of 450 
has already been exceeded. So far, he has enough 
reservations to assure a turn-away crowd of about 600. 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



25 



■M 



HITCH 

YOUR SELLING 

TO AIR MEDIA BASICS 

AND WATCH YOUR SPOT ZOOM 




I960 AIR MEDIA BASICS $2.00 



REPRINTS 



TIMEBUYING BASICS 
TELEVISION BASICS 
RADIO BASICS, FM BASICS 



] to 10 _ 40 cents each 

10 to 50 30 cents each 

50 to 100 _ 25 cents each 

100 to 500 20 cents each 

500 or more 15 cents each 



To Readers' Service, SPONSOR, 40 E. 49th Street, N. Y. 17 
Please send me the following: 



.'60 AIR MEDIA BASICS ISSUE 
.TIMEBUYING BASICS 
.TELEVISION BASICS 
.RADIO BASICS, FM BASICS 



NAME... 

FIRM 

ADDRESS 




8 S 

CO o 

2 § 

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co <=> — 

cj $ 2 

Ss m cr> s 






CF> &0 ' *-« 

GO <3 

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SPONSOR 


• 24 april 196 



MIHHHRHNHMH9HflH9HBSwHHMHHH 



24 April 1961/SP0NS0R-WEEK 






STANTON'S PEABODY: A REMINDER 

In accepting a 1960 Peabody award for the presiden- 
tial tv debates, CBS president Dr. Frank Stanton gave 
full credit to legislators and other broadcasters. 

These included the late Sen. Blair Moody of Michi- 
gan, Sen. John 0. Pastore, R. I., and Rep. Oren Harris, 
Ark., all active in circumventing Section 315 "equal time" 
restrictions. 

Said Stanton: "I accept it (the award) on behalf of 
the more than 1400 radio and tv stations which broad- 
cast the debates. And finally, I accept it — not as a re- 
ward — but as a reminder. For we still have before us the 
task of permanently freeing broadcasting from unreal- 
istic restrictions in the most serious business a de- 
mocracy has — chosing its leadership." 

(For other awards, see WRAP-UP, pp. 65, 58.) 



Welch asking extra questions in summer 
spot tv availabilities check with reps 

Welch Grape Juice (Manoff), in calling for availabili- 
ties last week re its summer spot tv campaign, inter- 
polated a request that will likely cause some eyebrow 
lifting among the stations in the markets involved. 

The request was that the list of availabilities make 
note in each instance of (1) the summer incentive 
rates and (2) any preemptible plans. 

It isn't common, reps observe, for an availability call 
to include this dual bid for information. 

The Welch campaign — minutes and 20's, day and 
fringe time — will go 10 weeks, starting 9 June. 



96 under-$ 100,000 advertisers in network 
tv in 1960 include 27 new clients — TvB 

In 1960, 376 advertisers used network tv, more than 
any year since 1956 when 341 advertisers used the me- 
dium, reports TvB. 

There were 53 new advertisers, 42 spending less than 
$200,000 and 27 of these less than $100,000. In the 
under-$100,000 category there were 96 advertisers, old 
and new. 

The five leading network spenders and their gross 
time expenditures in 1960 were P&G, $46.4 million; 
American Home Products, $33.4 million; Lever Bros., 
$28.6 million; General Motors, $23.0 million, and Colgate- 
Palmolive, $22.5 million. 

TvB's reports on spot and network spending by varied 
types of advertisers showed substantial increases by 
several groups, including gasoline and publishers. 

Total gasoline spending increased 22 per cent, reach- 
ing $32.8 million, $24.3 million of it in spot, while net- 
work spending jumped from $9.9 million (1959) to $15.7 
million. 



NBC TV's $4 million daytime week 

Daytime tv orders placed at NBC TV by three clients 
within one week add up to some $4 millions. 

Leeming (Esty) ordered 78 October-through-March 
quarter hours in six different shows. Total value, in- 
cluding Leeming's debut into nighttime with 26 minute 
participations, is $2 million. Some of the money prob- 
ably came from Leeming's spot radio campaign, which 
ended prematurely last month. 

Pillsbury (Burnett) will go into four quarter-hours in 
June. If lasting for 52 weeks, billings would be $1.5 mil- 
lion. The buy represents a partial cutback of present 
CBS TV daytime commitments. 

Ex Lax (Warwick & Legler) has older women as its 
objective in double cross-plugs on three shows, starting 
in June. Projected to 52 weeks, the expenditure tallies 
$900,000. Product had been using three radio networks 
regularly. 



Labunski hits radio "prime time" cliche 

The notion that 7-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m. is radio's "prime 
time" and that the rest is inferior "non-prime" was 

attacked by Stephen B. Labun- 
ski, v.p. and general manager 
of WMCA, New York, speaking 
before the Kansas Association 
of Broadcasters in Topeka this 
week. 

Labunski ripped into the em- 
phasis on early morning and 
later afternoon audience — 
heavily an automotive one — 
that was radio's first counter to the early days of tv. 

"What was once a sure-fire formula for attracting au- 
dience and attracting advertisers," stated Labunski, 
"has now become a somewhat tired and unimaginative 
routine utterly lacking in the kind of accomplishments 
radio can and should be making as a major communi- 
cations medium." 




B. Labunski 



COYLE TO ABC INTERNATIONAL 

AB-PT has formed a new subsidary, ABC International 
Television, Inc., and has elected Donald W. Coyle as its 
president. He was formerly v.p. of ABC's International 
Division. 

ABC already has minority shares in many foreign sta- 
tions and played a role in the setting up of the world's 
first international commercial tv network, CATVN in 
Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Honduras, and 
Nicaragua. 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 54 




•Is this the one you want me to try, Mom?" Her mother in the background is one of the nation's adults, 
who receive and control 98% of the U. S. income. WBT, for over 39 years the Charlotte radio station 
with the biggest general audience, also has the highest percentage of adult listeners. They turn to WBT 
because of responsible programming, outstanding service and fine entertainment. In the WBT 48-coimty 
basic area, adults receive and control most of the $2,690,780,000 worth of spending money. If you waul 
to make more sales for your clients, clearly the radio station to specify is the one that reaches more 
of the adult listeners. . .WBT RADIO CHARLOTTE. Represented nationally by CBS Radio Spot Sales. 

Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 



Sources: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Nielsen Coverage Service Number Two and Sales Management's Survey of Buying Power, 1960 



SPONSOR 

24 APRIL 196 1 




Will (saturated) fats meet (unsaturated) oils in a . . . 

CHOLESTEROL WAR ON TV ? 



^ So far, dairy-foods producers have not countered 
hard-hitting tv claims of Wesson, Mazola, Fleischmann's 

^ Situation similar to filter tip craze of early '50s 
is envisioned for producers of poly-unsaturated foods 



I he American Heart Association's 
caveat to "eat less animal fats and 
more vegetable oils as a precaution 
against heart attacks," has set off a 
product war which will probably be 
fought on the airwaves. As a matter 
of fact, television is already playing a 
tremendous part in the campaigns be- 
ing waged in behalf of most vegeta- 
ble oil margarines and shortenings. 
Should the AHA's first report on 
cholesterol be corroborated by addi- 
tional findings "it will be every man 



for himself with new corn oil marga- 
rines springing up as fast as filter 
cigarette brands were born in the 
early fifties," the advertising director 
of a leading margarine manufacturer 
told SPONSOR. 

The two most popular and widely 
distributed corn oil margarines on 
the market now are Fleischmann's Su- 
preme produced by Standard Brands, 
and Mazola margarine, a Corn Prod- 
ucts effort. 

Both are heavilv advertised on tele- 



vision. Both stress the "benefits of 
corn oil, rich in poly-unsaturates" in 
their copy. 

One brand manager commented 
that the education process in the area 
of fats and their harmful effects will 
probably take a much longer time 
than did the explanations of tars and 
nicotines during the "cancer" scare. 
But. when the terms involved in the 
"fats" area are fully understood he 
anticipates a "complete revolution in 
shortening and margarine products." 

Affected adversely by all this will 
be the dairy products manufacturers. 
The American Dairy Association has 
already hit back at the beginnings of 
the "cholesterol crusade" with a 
pledge to up its advertising ante in 
1961 to fight the "increasing number 
of efforts to prescribe medicine 
through food advertising or through 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



29 



sensationalized reporting of minor 
news out of research laboratories." 
The association s total advertising 
budget runs around $4.6 million. 

Of this, roughl) half will he spent 
on tv. However, most of the televi- 
sion advertising will he institutional 
on behalf of milk, butter, and ice 
cream. The print ads. however, in 
trade and consumer publications, "will 
answer the challenge waged h\ the 
competitors." 

It all began with the American 
Heart Association's public statement 
recommending reduced fat consump- 
tion combined with reasonable sub- 
stitution of unsaturated fats for ani- 
mal fats in the diet. 

Leading proponent of the choles- 
terol theory is Ancel Kevs. I . of Min- 
nesota physiologist Here is how he 
explains the three major tvpes of fats 
in foods: saturated fats, which are 
found in meats and dairv products, 
"promote production of cholesterol 
in quantities too large for the body to 
excrete': mono-unsaturated fats, pre- 
dominant in olive oil and most mar- 
garines, "have no apparent effect at 
all on blood cholesterol levels'": poly- 
unsaturated fats, such as those in 
corn, cottonseed or fish oils, "actually 
lower cholesterol by increasing the 
excretion of bile acids." 

One of the first reactions to the 
American Heart Associations state- 
ment, and Ancel Keys' theory, came 
from the National Dairv Council. It 
read: "there is evidence that altering 
the levels of unsaturated fats in the 
body tissues by dietary means can 
produce pathological changes which 
could be dangerous." 

What is the FTC reaction to all 
this "We have a number of files 
opened as a basis for considering en- 
tering the problem of participating in 
certain claims as a result of the re- 
lease by the American Heart Associa- 
tion. FTC official Charles Sweeney 
told SPONSOR. "The advertising of a 
number of firms is being considered 
for examination. \\ e are making a 
study of the over-all problem but 
there has been no inquirv to date." 
He indicated that FTC hasn't an) 
idea, as vet. when their reports will 
be out but that thev have doctors 
working hard on the problem around 
the country. 



According to other industry 
sources, advertising which is being 
considered for examination includes 
Wesson Oil. Ma/ola and Fleisch- 
mann's. 

I he first "unsaturated fat" claim 
to hit the nation- t\ screens came 
from Fleischmann's Supreme marga- 
rine. The Meischmann product is 
made "from 100' < corn oil." Vege- 
table fats, such as corn oil. can be 
made solid without hydrogenation, 
and Fleischmann's claims the corn oil 
in their margarine is parliallv hv- 
drogenated. One of its competitors, 
however, claims that Fleischmann's 
is bydrogenated, thus losing most of 
the benefits of corn oil. 

Fleischmann's led the wav. It cap- 
tivated everyone's imagination. In 12 
months it sold 61 million pounds of 
margarine, which is considered an in- 
credible figure. It cut into butter 
users, luxury margarine brands like 
Imperial, and medium-priced marga- 
rines. The only brands unaffected bv 
the new product were the "price" 
brands, those selling for between 
twelve and twentv cents per pound. 

Next on the scene was LVlazola mar- 
garine. This Corn Products spread is 
47% corn oil and 53' '< combination 
cotton seed and sov bean oil. The 
latter two are bydrogenated until they 
form irregular walls inside which 
the liquid corn oil is trapped. There- 
fore, although it is made with only 
17' ! corn oil. at least this amount re- 
mains unhydrogenated. 

Mazola margarine was introduced 
in several test markets in 195-9 under 
the brand name Cornette. After eight 
months the name was changed to Ma- 
zola. a new package was created, and 
it was introduced into expansion areas 
covering over 'MY '< of the I ,S. mar- 
ket, including "New York, Philadel- 
phia. Chicago. Los Angeles and San 
Diego. 

However Mazola. and other corn 
oil products, now have the job of 
convincing the public that their brand 
is different from the already-success- 
ful Fleischmann's. 

To do this. Mazola has bought into 
spot carriers on all three networks 
fo] Mazola margarine. 

Mazola is also advertised regularlv 
in the parent company's schedule of 
davtime network tv spots, mostlv in 



Salad oil products 




rlesj ol C S. Teleserrla 



reruns of film series. 

Mazola's copv line is basicallv the 
same in both tv and print advertis- 
ing. Recent Mazola research indical 
ed that consumers understand that 
there are "good and bad fats, satu- 
rated vs. unsaturated fats." 1 here- 
fore, although "fat" is a dirty word 
in the food business. Mazola decided 
to use it in the copv. 

The Mazola brand people trv to 
stav away from the polv -unsaturated 
claims, the cholesterol claims and the: 
like. The main theme is "Mazola 
margarine, of all leading brands, is 
best to replace spreads high in satu- 
rated fat." 

Who are the buyers of corn oil 
margarines? According to Fleisch- 
niann and Mazola research it was 
learned that the major it) of their 
customers now come from "older' 
marrieds. with few children, mostly j 
white collar workers who understand 
that there is a health storv involved 
in com oil margarines. 

What is the future of corn oil 
products? "It will be something like 
the cigarette thing, though not as vi<f 



30 



SI'OXSOK 



21 um;ii. 1961 



stress cholesterol issue in tv but dairy foods ignore challenge 



PRODUCTS made mainly of corn or cot- 
tonseed oil (like Mazola and Wesson oil 
at left) have been hitting away at tv view- 
ers with hard-sell commercials stressing 
health aspects and their poly-unsaturated 
unhydrogenated fats which are likely to 
have no cholesterol, according to recent 
American Heart Assn. reports. American 
Dairy Assn., however, which recently 
termed its competitors "cholesterol cru- 
saders," has decided to bypass tv as a 
medium to "fight back" and will instead 
use institutional commercials on behalf 
of its three major products, milk, butter 
and ice cream (at right). The Dairy Assn., 
will use its print ads to counteract strong 
claims made against animal fats in a good 
deal of margarine and shortening tv and 
print advertising. Other proponents of the 
"poly-unsaturated" school are Corn Prod- 
ucts' Mazola Margarine and Standard 
Brands' Fleischmann's Supreme margarine. 










lent or quick," said the Corn Prod- 
ucts spokesman. He explained that 
little companies are already spring- 
ing up throughout the country, which 
are taking advantage of corn oil 
claims. 

In New York, for example. Vesta 
Foods, manufacturer of dried soups 
and a frozen line, lists "unhydrogen- 
ated corn oil," in all of its ingredient 
claims. 

In Los Angeles a dressing oil and 
margarine line known as Saflower, 
produced by Hollywood Products, 
has really caught on. This thing took 
off in Los Angeles and shook every- 
one up. Practically overnight it put 
a 10' ( dent in the luxury market, 
and a 3% dent in the over-all mar- 
garine market. 

More and more companies are com- 
ing out with a liquid vegetable oil 
story. And should the heart theory 
ever be substantiated with more re- 
search "Look out." 

A third major product which is 
chock full of poly-unsaturated claims 
in its tv advertising, is Wesson Oil. 
Wessons commercials seem to imply 



that their product is healthier than 
others, for those people whose doc- 
tors' advised them to be careful of 
their fat intake. 

Wesson is made from winterized 
cottonseed oil and is "never hydro- 
genated" and is "poly-unsaturated" 
according to its label. 

How about the other leading vege- 
table shortenings? Most of the oth- 
ers seem not to have changed their 
copy lines because of the "cholesterol 
crusade." 

A spokesman for Lexer Bros/ Spry 
brand ("made of hydrogenated vege- 
table oil . . . contains no animal fat") 
said Sprv hasn't changed its copy line 
to meet the cholesterol claims. 

"There has been some difficulty 
about using the term Cholesterol in 
advertising," he said. He indicated 
that there has been at least one in- 
junction against a major vegetable oil 
user for using the word, but he de- 
clined to name the brand. 

"Most of them say they contain 
polv-unsaturated fats but what house- 
wife reallv knows what this means?," 
he said. "For this reason, we have 



not made any competitive claims." 

He indicated that Spry is now test- 
ing a new product, Lite Spry, in Phila- 
delphia and Pittsburgh. This product 
is also uninvolved in the unsaturated 
fat claim area. Spot tv is being used 
in the test markets. 

Planter's Peanut Oil also is com- 
pletely unaffected by the "fats war." 

Crisco is another major brand 
which hasn't altered its copy in this 
area. The fact that it is a hydrogen- 
ated vegetable shortening has always 
been stressed in Crisco copy. 

What does all this mean to spot tv 
and radio? 

It appears that at the drop of a 
medical report corroborating . the 
AHA's initial statement, there will be 
an open rush of new products made 
from corn and cottonseed oil. In that 
event, it should all have pretty much 
the same effect as the filter-tip craze, 
on broadcast advertising. 

One thing is sure. No shortening 
or margarine brand is sitting on its 
claims these days. All eyes are busy 
watching the FTC. health associations, 
public reactions — and each other. ^ 



SPONSOR 



21 APRIL 1961 



31 



BATES VS. BURNETT ON TV 

^ Recent disagreement with Rosser Reeves' book by Leo Burnett reflects deep, 
sometimes opposite, conviction about the way advertisers should use television 



Lb>'<> Burnett had the ad world buzz- 
ing again last week, from Madison to 
Michigan Avenues, from 066 Fifth 
Avenue to Prudential Plaza. But his 
disagreement with Rosser Reeves, 
board chairman of Ted Bates & Co., 
went deeper than his jest-filled re- 
marks on "originaliy" to the Adver- 
tising Writers Club of N. Y. It served 
to illustrate the considerable differ- 
ence in their approach to television 
b\ two eminently successful agencies. 
There is no question that tv has 
become their major concern. Ted 



Bates, a $150 million shop, bills 
about $120 million in tv — half to net- 
work and half to spot. Leo Burnett 
Co., a $117 million agency, puts 60% 
of its total billings, or about $64 mil- 
lion into tv — $43 million in network 
and $21 million in spot. 

For the advertising industry, the 
paramount questions were: how are 
Burnett and Bates different in their 
approach to tv — and why? 

Clients, of course, make a differ- 
ence, and the two agencies' lists illus- 
trate this point well. Burnett has ac- 



counts that are leaders in their field 
I Kellogg. Allstate, Motorola, Clmsler 
— corporate, Mavtag, Hoover, Pfizer, 
Pillsbury, P&G, Philip Morris, Swift 
& Co., Green Giant, Sunkist Growers, 
Tea Council, Pure Oil, etc.), clients 
interested in establishing their '"im- 
age." in selling institutionally as well 
as hard. 

Bates, the hard-hitting, merchan- 
dising, hard-sell agency, serves the 
package goods accounts, the pharma- 
ceuticals, bathroom, laundry and 
kitchen products (American Chicle. 




ROSSER REEVES SAYS: 



* 



"WE APPROACH now, and gingerly, the most dangerous word 
in advertising — originality. Here, without doubt, is the Golden 
Fleece for which all of Madison Avenue is seeking. Here, misty, 
distant, and infinitely desirable, is the copywriter's Holy Grail. 
"Unfortunately, it has ruined more advertisers than it has 
ever made, for it has never been defined — and the searchers thus 
are never sure just what it is they're seeking. 

"This preoccupation with 'originality,' at times, leads writers 
to absurd extremes. Suddenly, one of the very few truly original 
advertisements will appear. It may be a great success. Immedi- 
ately, these writers begin to imitate it — unaware that they are 
copying merely the form, rather than the concealed gears, pul- 
leys, and mechanisms that the master copywriter has concealed 
beneath the surface. 

"Such devices (the eyepatch, the beard, the animated brewers), when they implement the copy, are not 
folly. They only become folly when they do not implement the copy, when the device itself is assumed to 
be a principle of advertising probability, when as Claude Hopkins put it, 'the writers abandon their parts. 
They forget they are salesmen and try to be performers. Instead of sales, they seek applause.' 

"Too many writers assume that mere 'difference,' 'cleverness,' the 'queer and unusual' — like the 
philosopher's stone, for which the ancient alchemists sought — have within them some mysterious esseix :e 
which can transmute lead into pure and shining gold. 

"Unfortunately, lead remains lead. We must start with gold." 



■Excerpt from "Reality in Advertising" (Alfred A Knopf, Inc., loud) 



32 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



Carter Products, Colgate-Palmolive, 
Continental Baking, Minute Maid, 
Morton, National Biscuit, Standard 
Brands, Warner-Lambert, Whitehall, 
Wallace Labs, Uncle Ben's, Brown & 
Williamson), clients in the thick of 
a daily store-shelf fight and inter- 
ested, simply, in sales. 

Did the type of clients, then, make 
over these agencies in their own 
image? Definitely not, answered the 
agencies, as SPONSOR questioned them 
on their philosophies of television 
use. It was the agencies, with their 
articulated theories and policies of 
"how" to advertise, that attracted the 
clients. And in talking to sponsor, 
Burnett and Bates crystallized their 
divergent attitudes toward the tv 
medium: 

• In choosing network program- 
ing, Bates favors shows that will en- 



able the viewer to "escape"; Burnett 
looks for shows with a "basic, honest" 
quality that are "compatible" in the 
living room. 

• Buying time on a network, Bates 
feels, is no more than a "uniform 
spot purchase"; Burnett seeks to 
maintain a stable of programs. 

• Shows are chosen by Bates to 
fit a product's consumer profile; Bur- 
nett first looks for a well conceived 
show that will sustain itself over a 
long period of time. 

• Spot television is gradually los- 
ing favor at Bates, because of its 
"appalling" paper work; Burnett still 
favors spot for its flexibility — heavy- 
ing-up, supplementing and support- 
ing, introductions, testing, etc. 

Bates' current mood about spot is 
of the greatest importance to that me- 
dium, as Bates is perhaps the leading 



agency specialist in spot tv and the 
top user. The emphasis is undeniably 
shifting to spot carriers and other 
network buys. 

"The paper work on a spot buy is 
appalling," said Edward A. Grey, 
senior v.p. in charge of media opera- 
tions. "We are intrigued by network 
participations for which there's one 
piece of paper instead of endless 
pieces for say 140 spots bought." 

Even so, Bates media relations 
chief. Don Severn, is constantly trav- 
elling to stations, working out prob- 
lems, even helping them to shuffle 
schedules to allow clearance for Bates 
network shows. Bates, which brought 
about the piggy-back and the 30-sec- 
ond-spot. now would like to see flat 
rates with discounts based on dollar 
volume instead of time category 
breakdowns. 



LEO BURNETT SAYS: 



* 



"OUR WAY of thinking seems to have developed for us some 
rather distinguished enemies. Not everybody loves us. Writers 
of some ability have bathed in our fire and gone off cursing. But 
worse than that — we are not loved by advertising men who know 
us only remotely. You have a chap here in New York, who, judg- 
ing by his book, doesn't seem to take kindly to our sort of folks. 
'Originality,' he says, is the most dangerous word in advertising. 
I must admit that it takes a very original man to make a remark 
like that, but it's kind of a shocker. Sort of like having Westing- 
house decide to come out with a theme line, 'Progress is our most 
unimportant product.' I won't try here to refute that view of our 
business. That fellow's agency bills more than ours does, and 
I might properly be asked if I'm so smart, why ain't I rich. May- 
be Charlie Brower (BBDO) will take him on sometime. Charlie's 
bigger than he is. And original, too. 

"That agency, which seems to be identifying itself as the apostle of unoriginality, that agency said a 
while back that it had '700 people working to keep the client from changing an ad' that had run for 11 
years. We've got '700 people' working like crazy to make new ads and commercials. We're nutty. We 
like to make advertising. We think the people we're trying to reach can like advertising, and advertisers. 

"Oh, we think there's room in the world of selling for the kind of creative work that seeks to grind a 
message willy-nilly into the awareness of the reader/viewer. We probably need it for contrast. There's al>o 
a considerable need for . . . creative work that leaves the willing reader/viewer nodding or smiling." 

•From a speech to banquet of the Advertising Writers Club of N. Y.. April 12. 19H0 




SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



33 



Bates deems spot tv 
paperwork appalling' 





TED BATES' media department, 
headed by senior v. p. Edward A. Grey, 
is shifting emphasis to spot carriers 
and other network buys. The paper 
work on spot, it feels, "is appalling," 
and Bates is intrigued by network 
participations for which there is only 
one piece of paper instead of "end- 
less pieces" for, say, 140 stations 
bought. It would like to see flat spot 
rates, with discounts based on dol- 
lar volume instead of time. The par- 
ticipation on "77 Sunset Strip" is 
thought of at Bates as a simple spot 
buy on 140 stations. 



Burnett clients use spot in a wide 
variety of situations: supplementing 
tv or other media: for seasonal or 
geographical activit) : as a quirk com- 
petitive weapon; for new product in- 
troductions: kev markets heavy-up: 
testing products or copy, and support- 
ing local sales drives. 

Media vice president Thomas A. 
Wright's department buys programs 
or spot campaigns on the hasis of 
delivery of the largest possible num- 
ber of prospects at the lowest cost. 
Significantly. Burnett's "largest pos- 
sible number." whenever the agency 
refers to it. is designated as living 
"in environments compatible with 
the products being advertised." 

Further import is given to the 
opinions of these agencies on spot b) 
a sponsor survev published about a 
year ago. When leading representa- 
tive firms were asked, "Which agen- 



cies have the best media shops?" — 
the) chose led Bates in Y ^. and 
I cm Burnett in Chicago. 

In their use of network television, 

Bates and Burnett have Keen consist- 

enl with their approach l<> spot: 
Bates wants "dispersion' : Burnett 
looks for "good shows."" "compatible" 
with a selected audience. 

In talking to Richard \. R. Pink- 
ham, senior v.p. in charge of broad- 
cast operations, il is apparent thai 
Hales gravitates toward shows with 
an emphasis on the "light touch. 
Most people, the theorj goes, lead 
humdrum lives: the\ look to the 
magic box for escape. 

But not just art) escape will do. 
Wells Fargo is an escape but on the 
serious side: Hales prefers the Mav- 
erick-type tongue-in-cheek approach 
to adventure. A reason for the suc- 
cess of the various \\ arner Bros. 
filmed shows is their "sunlit qual- 
ity." Shows about earnest young men 
solving murders are "square. 

The Bates line-up for April includes 
13 nighttime adventure-mystery-ac- 
tion programs, although some might 
debate the "sunlit quality" of certain 
entries: Lawman I Whitehall I . Surf- 
side 6 (B&W). Adventures in Para- 
dise I American Chicle), Hawaiian 
Eye i Carter I. The Untouchables 
I Whitehall 1 . 77 Sunset Strip I Ameri- 
can Chicle!, and The Roaring 20' S 
I B&W I— all on ABC: Malibu Run 
(American Home), Danger Man 
(B&W), Perrv Mason I Colgate). 
Checkmate i U&W I and Have Gun. 
Will Travel I Whitehall l -over CBS: 
and The Outlaws (Colgate) on NBC. 

Other Bates shows for \iuil include 
Ed Sullivan ( Colgate I . To Tell the 
Truth (American Home), and four 
times a week participations on Doug-' 
las Edwards I American Home. Car- 
ter) — on CBS: Bugs Bunny (Colgate), 
Leave it to Beaver (Colgate) and 
Wake that Spare iB&W I - on \BC: 
and NBC's Bachelor Father I White- 
hall). These non-action shows are 
for products that have housewife or 
older-person appeal. 

Just as Bates insists, in spot tv 
transactions, that it deals only with 
"senior" reps, so in network show 
selection it goes "onlj with the pros." 
Pinkham said that a non-pro ma\ 
show up with a good pilot, but that 
is no indication he can deliver even- 



week — at a decent price. 

He also lamented the "shallow res- 
ervoir of writers and producers, and 
the generall) poor quality available. 
"If you think what's on tv is bad, 
von ought to see what doesn't make 
it." 

Bales, he added, almost never usdj 
specials, because clients are sellifll 
package goods and there's "no senfl 
spending all your mone; in one 
place.'" \n exception is Minute Maid, 
with its NBC colorcasts. 

\n- the Bates people satisfied with 
the qualilv of the shows il- clients 
sponsor? "In a New ) other article" 
Pinkham recalled. "David Susskinl 
is quoted as saying I'm an educated 
man I ^ ale, '36), a patron of the aits, 
widelv read, cultured ... so why 
don't I buy the kind of programs I 
like? That's all Id have to do. When 
I like a show, that's when 1 -tarl 



lailllllll! I | 

Trends in tv selling 
worry Burnett brass 




BURNETT looks for "basic, honest 
quality" in buying into network: 
shows, and regards spot tv as a goodi 
buy for flexibility, heavying-up, sup- 
plementing, testing and introduction. 
The media department, headed by. 
v.p. Thomas A. Wright Jr., is con-; 
cerned over recent developments in 
network selling: the trends toward' 
triple-spotting, the magazine concept! 
and various other types of "over-j 
commercialization," including ABCj 
TV's 40-second station break, the 42- j 
second break contemplated by CBS 
TV, and the expected NBC follow-up.' 



34 



SPONSOR 



21 mmiii. 1961 



Bates and Burnett philosophies are reflected in commercials 




U.S. TELK -SERVICE 



'ONLY ANACIN, of the four leading headache remedies, has special ingredients . . ." and "Why don't you settle back 

. . with a Marlboro" bear the trade-marks of Bates' hard-sell, USP "video interpretation" and Burnett's "find a good 

dea, execute it well, and like it." Some Bates spots (e.g. Viceroy's, Carter's Pills) have lately gone to softer sell 



vorrying about ratings." 

Burnett's basic philosophy toward 
programing is that no program gets 
ts approbation unless it has basic 
lonesty and a quality of compatibil- 
ty with the living-room of any good 
Vmerican home. 

"We are open-minded. ' said a 
pokesman. "If we believe an idea 
s worthwhile, we expect any pack- 
tgers to submit to constructive prob- 
ng, honest criticism, and relentless 
nterrogation to assure ourselves that 
i program idea is well enough con- 
nived to sustain itself for more than 
>2 weeks." 

When a show gets program depart- 
nent approval at Burnett, media and 
•esearch take over, and "Slipsticks, 
galvanometers, Fridens" replace the 
'intuition, feel, imagination and 
udgment" of the programing execs, 
rhey check out the measurable as- 
sects of time period, competition, 
"ating prospects, public attitudes to- 
ward the program itself, and costs. 

At this point, the combined forces 
jf program, media and research de- 
aartments enter into a team evalua- 
:ion of all facts and judgments. If 
:he sum total of these findings is pos- 
itive, then a formal recommendation 
is made to account management and, 
jpon agreement, to the client. 



"Although we appreciate and ac- 
cept fully the media potentialities of 
a time period," declared the spokes- 
man, "it is the responsibility of Bur- 
nett's program department to meet 
the producer, without snow shovels, 
to determine the long-range direction 
of the program. If we buy that pro- 
gram, we have a continuing obliga- 
tion to the client to use the findings 
of our agency colleagues to do every- 
thing we can to keep the program 
fresh, alive and competitive." 

Burnett's nighttime shows in April 
include: Dennis the Menace (Kel- 
logg), Dobie Giltis I Pillsbury and 
Philip Morris), Tom Ewell (P&G), 
Route 66 I Philip Morris), half of 
Douglas Edwards' news show once a 
week (Philip Morris), and What's 
My Line? (Allstate)— all on CBS. 
Also. Thriller (Allstate) on NBC. 

Bates was the top network day- 
time tv user in 1960. billing $27,700,- 
000. Burnett placed fifth in daytime, 
with an $8,361,000 outlay. 

Both agencies are concerned with 
the metamorphosis of network tv buy- 
ing. Burnett still feels that the agency 
must be anxious about the property 
with which his client is identified, and 
must intensely examine and analyze 
its effectiveness. 

The purchase of an alternate half- 



hour at a cost of $3 million, the Chi- 
cago agency noted, is one of the most 
important decisions management faces 
today, and in no other area of man- 
agement is it called upon to make 
such a big decision with so few facts. 
By comparison, the decision to build 
a $3 million plant is a sure thing. 

In tv, it is asked to look at a script 
or pilot, put its faith and $3 million 
on the line, and hope for a 20 or bet- 
ter rating. In most cases, it's making 
the decision 18 months in advance. 
At the same time, it is confronted 
with soaring talent costs, a decrease 
in average audience sizes and a loss 
of efficiency. 

The agency is also concerned about 
quality of programing, the trend to- 
ward the magazine concept, and dedi- 
cation to numbers and reach and fre- 
quencv. It's worried about triple- 
spotting and various other types of 
"over - commercialization, including 
ABC TV's recent announcement of 
40-second station breaks." 

Burnett still feels that the adver- 
tiser's main concern is to "select and 
maintain a program or stable of pro- 
grams which will deliver the right 
audiences in large enough chunks to 
be economically affordable." In the 
"ever-changing programing picture," 
(Please turn to page 50) 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



35 





LAMENT of the tv model who appears in commercials only in seg- 
ments is by Lynne Charnay. "Every part of me is seen, but it's one 
part at a time. I'm a portion of the bride who's blueing things with 
Tide; I've been the Revlon lips, the Playtex hips, the Pin-it Curl, the 
Castro girl. Each commercial lets them see just a tiny piece of me." 



SPOOF on the paper napkin test, performed by Buzzi and Tom Raskin, | 
with former getting choked to death in the demonstration. "The finest 
paper napkin on the market is Toughies, with shred-proof hexachloro- 
form. I squeeze and squeeze. See that paper napkin resist all pres- | 
sure!" Original music and lyrics were written for 16 skits performed 



Light touches for heavy topics at 

^ Change of pace keyed 4-day Westinghouse Broadcasting public service con- 
ference in Pittsburgh. High point: original skit spoofing the radio/tv industry 



H 



leavy- and light-handed program 
fare at the recent Westinghouse 
Broadcasting conclave on public serv- 
ice in Pittsburgh both brought a big 
hand of applause from 400 delegates 
in attendance. 

They liked the serious tack taken 
bj Til speakers from all phases of the 
industry and observation points out- 
side it who. during the four-day pro- 
gram meet, commented, debated and 
injected their views on entertainment 
programs as well as public service 
clforts. 



Penetrating observations, however, 
were contrasted with pinpointed hu- 
mor from such specialists as Presi- 
dential Press Secretary Pierre Salin- 
ger and Humorist Sam Levenson. 
l)a\s with some meetings continuing 
from a.m. until 11 p.m. were 
lightened with receptions, formal din- 
ners, dramatic personalities and un- 
usual local sites. 

Perhaps the most outstanding site 
in terms of uniqueness was the Car- 
negie Institute, where a great marble- 
pillared hall was converted to a re- 



ception area, the massive Hall of 
Architecture was transformed with 
the aid of running fountains and 
2.000 candles into a dining room and 
the auditorium housed a double fea- 
ture of rive programing — an original 
satire on the broadcast industry 
called "Improper Channels" and spe- 
cialK arranged music by the Pitts- 
burgh Pops orchestra. 

The skit, scenes of which are pic- 
tured in these pages, was written by 
WBC staffer Bob Bernstein and pro- 
duced with \cw ■*) oik professionals 



36 



SPONSOR 



24 April 1961 





V '■ * * * 


• 






1 V f 

k XJI" 




m ~ 1' 




H i ■ 


' ; 




■K 


H j il 


; B 







TV-STRUCK DOCTOR acted by George 
Furth sings: "I want to do an operation on tv. 
I want 100 million people cheering me. I'd like 
to ditch this dignified, depressing rut. When 
the video director hollers 'cut' I wanna cut" 



WBC meet 



in the style of an intimate revue. This 
presentation projected — as did every- 
thing at the conclave — twin themes 
of Change and Communication. 

Delegates represented small and 
large stations, networks, production 
companies, advertisers, educational 
institutions and other groups. 

Public service came in for an "Im- 
proper Channels"' spoofing, too. 
Among its lines: 

"Public service is sacrifice but the 
final rewards are nice. Trips to Paris 
and Oren Harris will clear you of 
every vice. Fine with me, also right 
with the FCC. Don't go commercial 
or controversial, just program Jack 
Kennedy. With public service the 
show is free." ^ 




ROMANCE of the trade press 
themed this duo: "Men do 
just what I wish, not because 
I'm a dish: they're caught in 
webs by debs from SPONSOR. 
It was love at a glance since 
that NAB dance; the trade 
press breathes romance. So- 
cial customs we flout; spend- 
ing money is out. With other 
trade press we've no truck; 
we date each other 'cause 
we're stuck." Press people 
(trade, too!) came from all 
parts to attend conference 



TV AND RADIO CRITICS were lampooned, too, with gaudily attired trio singing: "Anyone 
can be a critic of tv. You do not have to know a craft or turn a phrase with ease. The only 
Kraft you have to know makes 20 kinds of cheese. First learn the alphabet, maybe a bit of punc- 
tuation. Then get a tv set and you're prepared for your vocation." WBC's Bob Bernstein 
wrote the lyrics, Nicholas Schacter the music, with each skit introduced a la vaudeville 




II 

!■-!■■ 

■ ■-■■■a 

umpr 

111! 

iiir 

in 

■ ■n 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 




VIOLENCE on tv enraptures 
teens, who admonish: "You 
haven't done a decent show 
since Shock Theatre. Carefree 
as Oliver Treyz," they chime. 
"Early or late show, there's 
only one great show — demons 
are a girl's best friends. Fam- 
ily shows give us a pain. We 
like things not in a jocular 
but in a jugular vein." Other 
spoofs: opera ("Who dropped 
Sullivan to a 5 point 3 with 
just a single song?"); West- 
erns ("Not a scout so much 
as burps; they're all intro- 
verted, quiet Wyatt. Earps") 



EHLERS UP 80%— HERE'S WHY 



^ Regional coffee switches most ad dollars from print 
to air blend; uses radio for mass, tv to upgrade image 

^ Radio spots center around early a.m. new-weather 
shows; classical music and public affairs in tv lineup 






toilers regional coffee i middle- 
Atlantic southern New England) 
tackles its giant competitors with a 
radio t\ blend. The strategy was 
evoked in \ { )r> { > when the advertiser 
moved the lion's share of its budget 
from print to the air media, and sales 
jumped 50' < that first \ear. another 
20', in 1960. 

Radio gets somewhat better than 
half of Ehlers' approximately §500,- 
000 broadcast budget. Its assign- 
ment is to spread the Ehlers message 
via regular news and weather pro- 
grams and intermittent announce- 
ment (lights coinciding with special 
promotions. 

Ehlers and its agency. Co-ordi- 
nated Marketing. New York, believe 
firmly in the rapport station person- 
alities have with their audience. In 
nearly every instance Ehlers calls on 
them to deliver the product story in 
their own words, working from fact 



sheets. The Ehlers brothers, in 
charge of the family-owned. Brook- 
lyn. N. \ ., firm, take a special inter- 
est in selection of radio personali- 
ties, meeting with them, and when 
possible, monitoring broadcasts. 

Merchandising of the radio pro- 
grams includes, in addition to poinl- 
of-purchase materials, periodic din- 
ners for area chain executives, with 
the radio personality on hand to 
meet them. Ehlers makes a practice 
of encouraging the radio personali- 
ties who deliver its spots to make fre- 
quent public appearances, at store 
openings, etc. 

Here is Ehlers' New York radio 
lineup: 

• W \BC— World News Roundup, 
Howard Heig I 7:30-7: 15 a.m. I . three 
times a week. 

• WCBS — 7 a.m. news, Olin Tice 
three times a week: Martha Wright 
one minute participation per week 



that is aired Thursday or Friday. 

• WNTA ( Newark ) — Between the 
Lines, simulcast discussion program, 
Sundays, one minute participation. 

Over WTIC, Hartford, Ehlers 
sponsors news and weather and runs 
an announcement schedule, with just 
about every message delivered by 
station personality Bob Steele. News 
casts are aired Mon.-Eri 16:50-6:55 
a.m.), while the weather programs 
take place Tues.-Thurs. (8:25-8:S 
a.m.). ''Weather programs seem to 
be especially successful outside of 
New York," states Lester L. Wolff, 
president of Co-ordinated Marketing. 
"Evidently people in smaller commu- 
nities are more dependent on know- 
ing the weather conditions." 

Ehlers stages announcement flights 
two or three times a year in other 
markets, but over WTIC it runs a 
regular announcement schedule cov- 
ering 26 weeks per year, on the air 
two weeks out of each month. The 
spots, all 10-second e.t.'s, are aired 
Thursdays and Fridays. 10 each day. 
Even in this e.t. campaign Ehlers 
utilizes the voice of Bob Steele, to 
maintain continuity. 

In Schenectady, Ehlers buys WGY 
weather shows announced by How- 
ard Tupper. who also does the com- 



TRADE AD, reproduced below, informs food retailers of the air personalities they can count on to help them sell Ehlers coffee. This ad is 
just one of the numerous ways Ehlers and its agency, Co-ordinated Marketing, merchandise the regional advertiser's full-blown radio/tv campaign 




Me£t tb Ehlers QcJIm 'FoW 




<£WW GhoAfL *4" *4e(oe*rjAl*a If* &mJ& jA" MtHH-ddtty 



38 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



nercials. On Mon.-Wed.-Fri. the 
rograms are heard 7:05-7:10 a.m., 
vhile the Tues.-Thurs. schedule calls 
or 8:05-8:10 a.m. 

Ehlers sponsors early morning 
lews on WPTR, Albany, Monday 
hrough Saturday. There the air 
alesman is station personality Paul 
'Tanagan. 

And, on WSPR. Springfield, Mass., 
Thiers' message is delivered by d.j. 
:> aul Monson adjacent to a news- 
veather portion of his morning 
;how, which is on the air Monday 
hrough Saturday. 

While Ehlers uses radio to tell its 
Story to as broad an audience as 
possible around breakfast coffee time, 
the advertiser has another kind of 
assignment for tv. One of its prob- 
lems, paradoxically enough, is that 
it costs less than most of its com- 
petition — this despite the high con- 
tent of Columbian coffee which adds 
to the cost. To counteract the reac- 
tion of many, the assumption that 
lower cost means lower quality, 
Ehlers has been sponsoring public 
affairs and cultural programs, to up- 
grade the image. 

The tv programs include Meet the 
Press, alternate weeks in New York: 
Great Music from Chicago, in New 
York and Hartford, and Between the 
Lines, a public affairs talk show, in 
New York. 

Wolff feels that to do an education 
job, such shows as these provide a 
better believability atmosphere than 
pure entertainment, especially where 
it's a quality audience you're after. 
He points out that authoritative state- 
ments are the subject matter of a 
Meet the Press, and this carries over 
to the commercial. In such surround- 
ings, the audience is more receptive 
to what the advertiser has to say r 
runs the theory. 

And the agency makes a special 
effort to develop commercials in keep- 
ing with the programs' caliber and 
subject matter. With Between the 
Lines, for which 11-year-old program 
Wolff serves as producer and mod- 
erator, the commercials are taped in 
the same session as the show, so op- 
portunities are golden for tie-ins. 
Likewise with Great Music from Chi- 
cago for which shows Ehlers may, for 
instance, include a theme from one 
of the day's featured works, and pro- 



illP!!ll!!llllillllllli:illll!lll!!llllllll!llll!llllllllllllllllll!lillllllin ' 



Ehlers believes in radio personalities 



ALBERT EHLERS, president of the 
coffee firm that bears his name, 
takes a personal interest in selec- 
tion of radio personalities to de- 
liver his company's message. He 
and the other leaders of the 
family-owned company meet with 
the candidates, and whenever 
possible monitor their broadcasts. 
Ehlers also sets up dinners at 
which area chain executives get 
to meet the on-air salesmen. In 
addition Ehlers urges its person- 
alities to appear at store open- 
ings, etc. 




■ ii 



ceed to compare its harmony with the 
blending of coffee. Ehlers was the 
sole sponsor of Great Music from 
Chicago for its initial 13 weeks, and 
plans to continue with the show, 
temporaril) off the air, just as soon 
as additional episodes become avail- 
able. 

Ehlers and Co-ordinated heavily 
merchandised the Great Music buy 
at the outset. They sent "tickets" for 



the tv conceits and a can of Ehlers to- 
principle retailers, suggesting they 
relax and enjoy the combination of 
great music and great coffee, while 
the tv commercials did a selling job 
for them. In addition, there were 
point-of-purchase posters with the 
picture of the upcoming concert's 
conductor and the suggestion to tune 
in the concert, relax and enjoy Ehlers 
coffee along with it. ^~ 







JFK appeared on Between the Lines, public affairs talk show simulcast on WNTA (AM-TV), 
Newark, in which Ehlers participates. With JFK is the show's producer/moderator Lester Wolff 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



39 



NEW TV HORIZONS FOR AUTOS 



^ Growing tv hillings of car makers spur broadening 
of video techniques. Spot spending is up around 25% 

^ TvB also reports that publishers spent more than 
six times as much on tv in 1960 as they did in 1959 



^%uto manufacturers are not only 
spending more money in tv but are 
increasing the variety of techniques 
in using the medium. 

This was revealed todav (21 April) 
by the Television Bureau of Adver- 
tising in summarizing gross time bill- 
ings among car makers during 1960 
in both spot and network tv. 

TvB also revealed that publishers 
made record use of tv last year. 
Gross time billings in that field were 
up more than six times over 1959. 

Auto firms are increasing their 
spot tv billings at a faster rate than 
their web spending. TvB-Rorabaugh 
reports show a $16,812,510 total for 
L960, compared with S12.143.000 in 
1959, an increase of about a third. 



In network tv auto billings are still 
considerably above the spot tv level. 
In 1960, auto firms invested a total 
of $41,421. 185 in gross time billings 
on the three networks. This com- 
pares with $37,492,882 in 1959. 
These are TvB/LNA-BAR figures. 
However, TvB estimated that on a 
net time and talent basis, actual auto 
company tv spending topped $75 mil- 
lion last year. 

"Whereas only two years ago," 
noted todays TvB report, "in the fall 
of 1958. all car advertising on net- 
work television was confined largely 
to 10 programs in prime time and a 
number of specials, the schedule has 
been changed radically. 

"In the fall of 1960. car advertis- 



ing on network television nas placed 
on 18 prime time programs, in ad- 
dition to specials, with the use of 
sports and daytime programs begin- 
ning to emerge." 

A total of 59 different car brands 
were advertised on tv in 1960, com- 
pared with 52 in 1959. 

Spot tv patterns continue to change 
also, TvB said. "All types of pro- 
grams — news, sports, feature films, 
etc. — have been used, with a large 
concentration of the advertising in 
the evening and occasional use of 
early morning tv." the TvB report 
said. 

The promotion bureau took cog- 
nizance of the slowing down of car 
sales toward the end of 1960 and in 
early 1961, but pointed out the pres- 
ent sales trend is upward. The in- 
dustry should top six million car 
sales this year with strong tv sup- 
port continued, the TvB report pre- 
dicted. 

Combined factory and dealer ad- 
vertising of the top seven tv users 
among the auto companies are, in or- 



Gross time billings of top 10 car brands on web and spot tv 

Spot 



Make 



FALCON 



Network 



2,109,513 



Network, TvR I.NA UAIl Spot, TvH Ilorabaugh 



4,470 



Total 



FORD 


$4,423,389 


$4,641,140 


$9,064,529 


CHEVROLET 


5,281,243 


2,523,120 


7,804,363 


OLDSMOBILE 


3,100,881 


936,990 


4,037,871 


CORVAIR 


3,829,108 


3,120 


3,832,228 


RAMBLER 


426,297 


2,677,130 


3,103,427 


PLYMOUTH 


2,444,984 


523,630 


2,968,614 


DART 


2,361,857 


14,990 


2,376.847 


POISTIAC 


1,261,415 


1,110,700 


2,372,115 


DAUPHIISE 


1,850,575 


412,970 


2,263,545 



2,113.983 



40 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



— - 



der of tv expenditures (gross time) : 

General Motors: network, $16,436,- 
692; spot, $5,173,600. The total of 
$21,610,292 compares with $17,252,- 
667 in 1959. 

Ford: network, $10,328,980; spot, 
$5,143,720. The total of $15,472,700 
is down compared with the 1959 fig- 
ure of $16,023,688. 

Chrysler: network, $8,529,308; 
spot, $1,716,270. 

American Motors: network. $426,- 
297; spot, $2,677,130. 

Renault Co.: network, $1,939,857; 
spot, $412,970. 

Studebaker-Packard : network. $1,- 
064,249; spot, $879,520. 

Kaiser Industries: network. $1,- 
771,249; spot $23,430. 

The publishing industry's record 
use of tv led to gross time billings of 
$5,012,022 last year. This compared 
to $705,593 in 1959. 

The 1960 billings were fairly even- 
ly divided between spot and network. 
In the former medium, publishers in- 
vested $2,770,000, compared with 
$679,000 in 1959. The network in- 
vestment totaled $2,242,022, a hefty 
rise over the 1959 figure of $26,593. 

There was no dominant pattern in 
the publishers' use of video. The 
leading advertiser in this categorv. 
Golden Press, used spot only and 
concentrated on announcements and 
I.D.'s. Cowles Magazines, the second- 
place spender, sponsored election and 
convention coverage on network tv. 
The Readers' Digest, used — on spot 
tv — announcements, I.D.'s, and pro- 
grams, and also bought into three 
NBC TV programs: Today, the Shir- 
ley Temple show and Riverboat. An- 
other convention sponsor was Field 
Enterprises, while Curtis Publishing 
followed a pattern somewhat similar 
to the Readers' Digest. 

Here are the gross time billings of 
seven leading publishers. 

Golden Press: $1,266,620 in spot. 

Cowles: $1,188,633 on network. 

Readers' Digest: $728,760 on spot 
and $133,599 on network. 

Field Enterprises: $587,898 on net- 
work convention coverage. 

Curtis Publishing: $318,650 on 
spot and $132,970 on network. 

McCall Corp.: $125,960 on spot 
and $162,165 on network. 

Book-of-the-Month Club: $64,870 
on spot. ^ 



7 ; 









; 




HELPING WELI manager Richard Davis (I) to spread around a bit of shipboard camaraderie 
i are executives of the station's rep firm, H-R: pres. Frank Headley (r) and v. p. Dwight Reed (c) 



HOW TO SELL CLIENTS: 
TAKE THEM ON A TOUR 



I o hear New Haven, Conn, radio 
station WELI people tell it, the way 
to win over listeners and influence 
advertisers, is: (1) sell them a sta- 
tion package tour, and, (2) send 
along as host, your strongest audi- 
ence-pull air personality. 

These were some of the unexpect- 
ed (and remunerative) side effects of 
the station's promotion — The Bud 
Finch Sunlane Cruise — earlier this 
year. 

Aside from bolstering the belief 
that radio can peddle high-priced 
wares (in this case, WELI sold the 
Mediterranean trip packages costing 
something like $650 per to 104 per- 
sons) , the promotion proved potent in 
establishing firm listener-station rap- 
port, and, as an extra bonus, an 
ideal set-up for talking turkey with 
potential advertisers. 

Among the cruisers were a num- 
ber of local businessmen who, find- 
ing themselves sharing shipboard 
conviviality with station people (sta- 
tion manager Richard W. Davis, his 
wife and the station's rep executives 



— H-R president Frank Headley, v.p. 
Dwight Reed and their wives also 
went along on the trip I , began to 
think kindly about doing business 
with the station. 

The whole thing, however, is not 
as simple to execute as one might 
suspect, cautions Davis, the station's 
executive, whose success formula 
points up these facets: first, a close 
working liaison with a top-notch 
agency I like New Haven's A and B 
Travel Agency) ; a carefully timed 
campaign (with special attention to 
the allowance of vacation-planning 
schedules — WELI first broke its Feb- 
ruary cruise back during the Labor 
Day weekend) ; and a saturation of 
piquant announcements. 

The strongest come-on bait, how- 
ever, was the news that the station's 
no. one air man, Bud Finch, would 
be on hand to serve as host during 
the 23-day cruise to whirl his com- 
panion cruisers through the planned 
activities. 

Word of this soon began to make 
(Please turn to page 51) 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



41 



"The Cofte <wc( f ^diwq . 



This is the first of a scries of ads devoted to facts 
about communism. It coincides with a continuing 
series of prime tune announcements on WKY RADIO 
and TELEVISION telling these and many more facts 
about communism to viewers and listeners. 

Altruistic? No. This effort might even he 
on the selfish side because we. as yon. can exist only 
in a free economy. 

Alarmist? Aren't people already anti-communist 
and pro-American? Certainly! Spiritually and emotionally. 
But there is a void of factual truth about the hard 
core of communist action. The communists know this. 
They continually attack this soft spot with ff Dr. JekyllV 
words that rationalize "Mr. Hyde's" actions. 

The threat to freedom is not so much in what the 
communists DO, as in what Americans DON'T do. 
One of the most serious "DON'TS" is not arming 
ourselves with facts to back up our belief in democracy. 

This is part of our effort to tell these facts. 



Prime Communicators to 1 Vi Million Oklahomans 



gggmm 




gg^iiWWviBiH,,^ 



««cji*^ 




42 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



THE COST OF FREEDOM - One of a series 



-mi COSTof Vntdfi%! 



Part of the Cost of Freedom is to understand the War of Words. 
When they say "Peace". . . what do they really mean? 



-' 



Lenin said: 

"Every peace program is a deception of the people and a piece of 
hypocrisy unless its principal object is the explanation to the masses of the need 
for a revolution, and to support, aid and develop the revolutionary struggle of 
the masses that is starting everywhere (ferment among the masses, protests, 
strikes, fraternization in the trenches,, demonstrations . . .)." 

— V. I. Lenin, General Committee Proposals Submitted to 
the Socialist Conference, April, 1916, Selected Works, 
International Publishers, New York, 1943, vol. V, pg. 237. 

But Lenin is dead... or is he? 

]. Edgar Hoover has said . . . "I, for one, find no reason to doubt the word 
of Nikita S. Khrushchev when he asserts that the injunctions of Lenin must be 
the guide to all communist activity." 






We aren't trying to preach. We are simply trying to strengthen the 
muscles of freedom of speech through exercising that freedom to the limits of 
our sphere of communications. Perhaps there will be facts in this series you 
can use in your sphere of influence. 




RADIO AND 
TELEVISION 

OKLAHOMA CITY 

The WKY Television System, Inc. 
WTVT, Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Represented by the Katz Agency 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



43 



SPONSOR ASKS 



IS PRODUCT PROTECTION DOOMED? 



Sam Vitr, media director, Doherty. Clif- 
ford, Steers & Shenfield, Inc., New York 
All changes historically are made 
to fulfill newly arisen (or thought to 
be newly arisen I human needs. (Ad- 
vertisers, whether we (house to admit 
it or not. are human. I And the re- 
cently re\ ised product protection 
policies would not seem to he excep- 
tions to this genera] rule. More and 
more advertisers have been, and are 



Yes, but it 
wont lessen 




the impact of 
commercials 
for quality 
products 



currently, moving into the television 
medium. As a result the question 
facing the television program plan- 
ners, similar to that of the city plan- 
ners in the face of the population 
explosion, is how do we accommo- 
date them all? The answer appar- 
ently so far as television is concerned 
is the revision of product protection 
policies. 

In the academic sense, it is prob- 
able that this is not as desirable as 
most of us would like it to be. Ideal- 
ly, I think, most of us would agree 
that the further, for example, one 
deodorant was from another the bet- 
ter. Realistically, however, I'm not 
sure even if we had a choice that 
such an approach would be right. If 
a product is good . . . and I think 
there can be very little disagreement 
that this is what ultimately counts . . . 
it probably could be ver\ effectivel) 
argued that showing it in juxtaposi- 
tion to its competitors would in real- 
it \ only help enhance its market posi- 
tion. Side by side, advantages and 
disadvantages tend to become much 
more clarified. 

As it is, however, it does not ap- 
pear that we really do have a choice. 
The stations control their time and 
the FCC. to a degree, their useage 
thereof. It is my opinion that the 
newly revised product protection 



policies are the results of an inevita- 
bility. As such. 1 am prepared to 
accept them. 

It would seem to me that these re- 
visions are in reality but an interim 
step toward the ultimate television 
product protection policy which 
would parallel those policies current- 
ly in effect for the print media. Is 
this good? Well, the answer, as in 
most things, probably depends upon 
your viewpoint. Let me say b\ way 
of hedging that whether or not it is 
good, it would be my opinion those 
advertisers producing a qualitv prod- 
uct are not going to be severely 
damaged. The others had better, as 
always, look out! 

Bren Baldwin, v.p.-associate media di- 
rector, Kenyon & Eckhardt Inc., New York 

The problem of proper product 
protection in spot television has pro- 
voked a flow of ink in the past, much 
of which has been critical of the 
stations. 

I must admit that here at Kenyon 
& Eckhardt our experience in this 
area has been relatively good. Con- 
sidering the voluminous technical 
problems facing the stations in pro- 
viding adequate separation of high- 
ly competitive advertising, especiallv 
with the influx of network shows 
with a multiplicity of sponsors, we 
feel this problem is being satisfac- 
torily handled. 

Sure, there have been instances 
where we have found competitors in 
and around shows we were in or 
where products we felt were com- 



We don't have 
much of an 
argument 
against it; 
print makes 
no guarantees 



petitive were scheduled around our 
own spots, but we would like to think 
that this generally has been the result 
of the logistics of the medium. 

We've found that this has come up 




once ever) two months or so, but ha 
been cleared up as soon as the sta 
tions were made aware of the con 
diet. Considering we've been advea 
tising highly competitive products o 
long station line-ups. this record is 
good one. 

So far as the current separation 
policies are concerned, we feel they 
are reasonable, both for our clients 
and for the stations. After all. we 
get no guarantee from other media 
that competitors will be a given num- 
ber of pages or a given distance away 
from our clients' advertising and we 
don't expect it. 

This subject, of course, could 
bring Us to consideration of double 
and triple spotting which has pro- 
voked volumes of copy but one on 
which we have vet to see adequate 
factual evidence for or against. 

It is true that one might logically 
expect his advertising to have a little 
better effect if it ran without distract- 
ing influences around it. Emotional- 
l\ this is a little like romance — a guy 
would prefer to seek the interest of a 
young lad\ without the competition 
of a couple of handsome interlopers 
at his table. 

But one can be devil's advocate 
for the opposite school of thought. 
The ultimate winner will have the 
best product and present it in a su- 
perior manner. And isn't this really 
the key to advertising and sales suc- 
cess? 



Ray Crandle, general manager, W'LUK- 
TV, Green Bay, Wis. 
It apparently is. and justifiably so. 
In my opinion, product protection 
originated from an artificial set of 
circumstances to begin with, and 
building from this flimsy base it grew 
to unweildy proportions. The more 
"protection" stations gave, the more 
was demanded. First there were ob- 
jections to directly competing prom 
ucts in too close proximity. Their 
displeasure was extended to all prod- 
ucts in a certain category, such as 
beverages. This went to the extreme 
where a beer might object to a tea. 
Some sponsors took exception to 



II 



SPONSOR 



21 \pril 1961 



products in entirely different cate- 
gories than their own, on esthetic 
grounds. 

At the same time, attention was 
turned to the time separation, and 
longer and longer periods were de- 
manded. 

What is the rationale behind all 
this "protection" business? It is 
based on a tenuous psychological 
theory that the presentation of a com- 
mercial shortly after one for a com- 



It is; not true 
that a close by 
competitor 
blots out a 




memory 



peting product would blot out all 
memory of the first spot. This is ob- 
viously ridiculous, as has been the 
lengths to which this thing has been 
carried. I don't for a moment advo- 
cate the spotting of competing com- 
mercials back to back, but I don't 
think we can reasonably justify much 
more. 

It's hard to understand why prod- 
uct protection never encumbered any 
of the other media. Magazines run 
page after page of solid advertise- 
ments, sometimes for competing 
products in close proximity. News- 
papers do the same. You see rows of 
billboards with absolutely no regard 
for product categories. 

Why have the air media alone been 
saddled with this anachronism? 
Like most other things, it began with 
the slimmest justification, and fed on 
itself until it reached its present pro- 
portions. 

As an informal statement of pol- 
icy, I'd like to say that we at WLUK- 
TV do not intend to run any com- 
petitive products back to back. How- 
ever, we must realistically face the 
fact that time separation is a rela- 
tive thing. For example, just to give 
lip service to existing shibboleths, we 
don't intend to run two cigarettes 
unless they are separated by at least 
20 minutes. But to pose a rhetori- 
cal question: would either product 
suffer if separated by five or ten min- 
utes? We think not! 

There is, however, one aspect of 
this situation which we do go along 
with all the way. Certainly, any 

( Please turn to page 52) 




Mr. Saudek (standing) checks copy with Mr. Lund at Omnibus shooting. 

Robert Saudek Productions 
take their cue from . . . 

TELESCRIPT 



Robert Saudek, producer of such highly regarded 
shows as "Omnibus" and the "Leonard Bernstein 
and the New York Philharmonic" programs has 
selected Telescript exclusively for prompting equip- 
ment. There must be a good reason . . . there is. 
Telescript is more dependable, has better service 
facilities and costs less initially. 

In your next film or TV show take your cue and 
call Telescript. 

ASK THE PEOPLE WHO USE ... 




IHESSfllPT 



NEW YORK • LOS ANGELES 



J32 N. LA BREA AVENUE • LOS ANGELES. CALIF. • HO. 9-7287 
155 WEST 72nd STREET • NEW YORK 23, N. Y. • SU 7-8111 




SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



45 



RADIO BASICS/APRIL 



'A 



Facts & figures about radio today 

1. CURRENT RADIO DIMENSIONS 



Radio homes index 



1960 1959 



50.1 
radio 
homes 




49.5 
radio 
homes 



52.0 51.4 

U.S. homes U.S. homes 

Source: 1 Jtn. 1960. SPONSOR: 1 Mar 
1959. A C. Nielsen; homes figures In millions 



Radio station index 








End 


of 


February 


1961 










Stations 
on air 




CP's not 
on air 


New station 
requests 


New station 
bids in hearing* 


Am 
Fm 


1 


3,561 
856 


1 


150 
206 


560 
71 


1 


183 
25 






End 


of 


February 


1960 






Am 
Fm 


1 


3,462 
696 


1 


79 
152 


1 583 
1 78 


1 


241 
36 


Source: 


FCC month!) 


report-*. 


commercial stations. 


•December. 







Radio set index 



Radio set sales index 



Set 

location 



Home 
Auto 
Public 
places- 

Total 



1960 



1959 



106,007,095 98,300,000 
40,387,449 37,900,000 

10,000,000* 10,000.000* 



156,394,544 146,200.000 



Source: RAB. 1 Jin. 1960. 1 Jan. 1959. 
sets In working order. "No current Information. 



Type 



Feb. 1961 



Feb. 1960 



666.228 611,579 

307,973 596,872 

974.201 1,208. 1 19 



2 months 
1961 



1.246.908 

695,109 



2 months 
1960 



1,414,867 
1.229,333 



942,017 2,644.200 



Total 

Source: Klectronic Industries Assn. Home figures ire estimated retail sales, auto 
figures are factory production. These figures are of U.S. production only. Radlm lr 
phonographs add another 15-20% to home sales figures. Figures are subject to change. 



2. NETWORK RADIO CLIENTS 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

Top radio network clients and time bought 



HOME BROADCASTS 
1961 



lalian Company. 



Total Home 
8'dcsts Delivered 



Advertiser 


(000) 


Standard Brands, Inc. 


137,373 


kcllopp Co. 


124,815 


Time. Inc. 


124,173 


1960 


Reynolds, R. J. tobacco 


128,720 


I'harmaco, Inc. 


125,652 


Time, Inc. 


117,791 



COMMERCIAL MINUTES 
1961 



Total Comm'l 
Min. Delivered 



Advertiser 


(000) 


Standard Brands, Inc. 


100,038 


Time, Inc. 


87,907 


Kellogg, Co. 


78,391 


1960 


Whitehall- AM, Home Prods. 


92,496 


Pharmaco, Inc. 


91,804 


Time, Inc. 


78,565 



46 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 




THIS IS AMERICA'S 
40™ RADIO MARKET 
. . . BIG AGGIE LAND 



Spreading across 175 counties in five states, 
WNAX Big Aggie Land embraces one of the 
world's richest agricultural areas. Almost 2*4 
million people, over 600,000 radio homes, are 
included in this vast and wealthy market. These 
people spend $2,250,000,000 a year at the retail 
level. 

An 84-county area Pulse Survey during Jan- 
uary of 1961 credits WNAX with top ratings in 
all 360 quarter hours, delivering 3 times as many 
listeners as the next ranking station. That gives 



Big Aggie a 66.4% share of audience. Traveling 
Americans add another 100,000,000 annually to 
the WNAX-570 market coverage area ... an 
area of many scenic attractions, a Big Aggie 
Bonus for WNAX advertisers. 

WNAX-570 is the one medium that can reach 
and sell the nation's 40th radio market. To sell 
your product in Big Aggie Land's 175 counties, 
sell on the station that most people listen to — 
WNAX-570. Your Katz representative will 
handle the details. 



I 



WNAX-570 CBS RADIO 



PROGRAMMING FOR ADULTS OF ALL AGES 
Peoples Broadcasting Corporation 

Sioux City, Iowa, Sioux Falls and Yankton, South Dakota 
Represented by Katz 




PEOPLES BROADCASTING 
CORPORATION 

WNAX Yankton. South Dakota 

KVTV Sioux City, Iowa 

WGAR Cleveland, Ohio 

WRFD Columbus-Worthington, Ohio 

WTTM Trenton, New Jersey 

WMMN Fairmont, West Virginia 



PONSOR 



24 APRIL 1961 



47 



"The Giant of 
Southern Skies" 




GIANT MARKET 
IN THE SOUTHEAST 1 

2.1 million People 
$2.8 billion Incomes 
$1.8 billion Retail Sales 

Compare it with Birmingham, 
Miami, and New Orleans, "The 
Giant's" 

GREENVILLE-SPARTANBURG- 
ASHEVILLE MARKET 



Contact us or our 
Reps, for facts, 
availabilities and 
assistance 

Q~*J AVERY- KMODEL 





Rationed and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



48 






SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Pepperidge Farms, Inc., Norwalk: \ 15-market campaign for 
breads starts earl] Max. Schedules are for five weeks using day an( 
night minutes and 2tTs. Buyer: Henrx Cleeff. Agency: Ogilvy, Ben 
son & Mather. New York. 

Best Foods Div. of Corn Products Co., New York: Schedules for 
\ucoa margarine begin 1 May and run through 25 June. Day and 
fringe night minutes and prime 20's are being set in 31 markets. 
Buyer: Boh Fennimore. Agencx : Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. N. Y. 

Corn Products Co., New V>rk: Lineup in about 25 markets for 
Niagara starch starts 30 April. Moderate frequencies of fringe night 
minutes will be scheduled for six weks.' Buyer: Jim Alexander. Agen- 
ex : Lennen & Newell. 

Schick, Inc., Lancaster, Pa.: Promotion for Krona blades begins 
this month in over 100 markets. Placements are 52 weeks, with nighl 
minutes and 20's being used. Beginning frequencies are light, in- 
crease 50' < after the first four weeks. Buyer: Joel Segall. ^gencj : 
Compton Adx .. New ^ ork. 

Miles Laboratories, Inc., Elkhart. Ind.: Alka-Seltzer begins 30 
April in about 40 markets. Schedules of night and weekend minutes 
will run for 18 xveeks. Buyer: Andy Anderson. Agencx: Wade Adv., 
Chicago. 

RADIO BUYS 

Ford Div., Ford Motor Co., Dearborn: Initial schedule in spot 
radio for Ford Div., after some time away, begins 23 April for two 
weeks in the top 50 markets. Buys are big. four and five station- in 
many markets, with 12 to 20 traffic spots per xveek per station. Buyer: 
Dorothv J hoi ton. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co., New York. 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., New York: Campaign for L & M 
Filter cigarettes, due to start 24 April, probably will not move until 
early Max. Runs of traffic minutes and 30's are placed for 23 weeks, 
around 25 spots per week per market. L & M market list usually runs 
from the top 12 through 50. Buyer: Paul Fitzgerald, \gencx : 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, New York. 

Cities Service Co., New York: This year's campaign for its gaso- 
lines starts 7 May, in 25-30 markets. About 30 drive-time spots per 
xveek per market are bought, txvo- and three-station placements. Buy- 
er : Bob Kellv. Agency: Lennen & Newell, New York. 

Parker Pen Co., Janesville, Wis.: Test campaign for radio begins 
1 Max for six weeks, in about 30 markets. Morning traffic minutes, 
15 to 20 per xveek per market, are being used, the poxver stations and 
those with heavy merchandising preferred. This is the sxvan song for 
Compton, Chicago; effective 1 July the account moves to Leo Burnett 
Co., Chicago. 

SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



CREATIVITY... 



wlmy-lv creates 
sales in the nation's 44th market* 



The imagination of the artist, together with 
his technique and skill, combine to create 
artistic beauty ... In the Industrial Pied- 
mont, the popularity and proven dominance 
of WFMY-TV have combined to create sales 
for over eleven years. 



To successfully sell the nation's 44th 
market*, include WFMY-TV in your plans. 
WFMY-TV delivers 2.3 million customers 
who annually spend $3.2 billion dollars . . . 
call your H-R-P Representative today. 

*Source: Television Magazine, 1960 Data Book 




SPONSOR 



GREENSBORO, N. C 

)W in OUR 12TH YEAR OF SERVICE' 
Represented by Harrington, Righter and Parsons. Inc 
York. Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco Atlanta, Boston, 

24 april 1961 



49 



BATES VS. BURNETT 

i Continued from page 35 I 
according to Burnett, this has become 
increasingl) difficult, while the size 
of the commitment increases and 
"firm long-term contracts arc the or- 
der of the day." 

Bates disagrees, because, in the 
opinion of niediainan Grey, "Network 
in the old sense of the word is a mis- 
nomer today. We look on a network 
participation as a uniform spot pur- 
chase. A minute on 77 Sunset Strip. 
for example, is figured as a minute 
spot on 140 markets." 

Rosser Reeves calls it "dispersion." 
Spread announcements around, and 
don't seek frequency until you've 



reached just about everyone once. 
■'That's why the network show in the 
old sense is not for Hates." said Grey, 
"We don't want to use one product 
more than once in a show. 

Bates' clients, for the most part. 
put out products that sell for less 
than SI. "'This alTecl> oui -how pur- 
chases."' Burnett has different types 
of clients, associations, insurance 
companies, corporate accounts, 
"'which would point toward other 
types of show-. 

At Bates, the media, account group 
and clients determine the media spec- 
ifications of the show needed, hased 
on the product's consumer profile, 
competitive picture, promotion plans, 





BECOMING INCREASINGLY MORE 
COMPLICATED . . . 

YOUR NO. 1 
BUY IS STILL 

KEWB 

In San Francisco, as always, consistently 

high ratings . . . consistently low cost-per-thousand 

... all day long or all year long. You're 

never "out of season" on KEWB, number one 

buy in its third year and currently 

delivering 101 adults in every 100 homes, 

all paying close attention! 



PULSE: AUDIENCE COMPOSITION 

JAN-FEB, 1961 

TOTAL RATED PERIODS 

national representatives: 
The Katz Agency, Inc. 



BROADCASTING CORPORATION "First in Contemporary Communications' 

CI IZEN OF I HE BAY AREA 



pricing, distribution strengths and 
weaknesses, packaging. Then the 
program department is called in to 

find the show that fills the hill. 

Most obvious to tin- eye ol the 
average viewer as well as the t\ and 
advertising specialist, is the differs 
ence between Burnett and Bate:-' ap- 
proach to the television commercial. 

"If there is anv secret to how Bur- 
nett conies up with as many success- 
ful commercials as it does, s.ii.l a 
Burnett creative department spokes- 
man, it may be because of one oi all 
of the following factors: 

• Burnett's television commercial 
department does just one thing; it 
creates and produces television com- 
mercials. 

• Tv copy, art and production are 
all in the same department, reporting 
to one man. 

• The department is given a greal 
deal of creative freedom — plus the 
encouragement from agency manage- 
ment and the account staff to con- 
stantly search for arresting and effec- 
tive new ways "to say it. show it. or 
sing it. 

Leo Burnett put it this wax in his 
talk to the Advertising Writers Club 
of N. Y.: 

"We have a handful of creative ex- 
ecutives through whom almost every- 
thing we create is cleared. Our Cre- 
ative Review Committee — a parcel of 
opinionated malcontents — studies al- 
most everything we do long before 
the accountmen have to struggle off 
to the airport. 

"Our committee is a sort of extru- 
sion die that tries to give the agencj 's 
work the shape of quality. Of course, 
our patterns keep broadening in 
range of style, changing and improv- 
ing as our many good writers push 
through their own ideas — ideas that 
have their own bite and abrasiveness, 
and so reshape our dies. 

"I <.>uess we're kind of nutt\. We 
throw out a lot of good ideas. W e 
take the attitude that it's not enougl 
for us to find a good idea and exe- 
cute it well- we also have to like it. * 
Rosser Reeves, in a talk with 
SPONSOR, implied that his agenc) 1 
copywriters I he called them "ad- 
makers") don't necessarily have to 
like the ideas they work with, that 
their high rate of pay keeps their 
morale high while working in the 
confines of Bates' rigid principles. 
and, besides, they believe in the dogjj 
ma. anyway. 



50 



SPONSOR 



24 APRIL 1901 



As defined in Realities in Advertis- 
ing, published by Knopf ("Don't ask 
me for quotes; go to mv book . . ."), 
the three basics of Bates commercials 
that avoid "vampire video" (com- 
ponents that suck strength away from 
the main story) are: (1.) Lock the 
video to the audio. Let the consumer 
see with his eye what he is hearing 
with his ear; I 2. ) Put the announcer's 
voice under; (3.1 Seek for a specific- 
video interpretation of the U.S.P. 
("unique selling proposition"). 
"When you begin to apply these 
basics, much of the nonsense will dis- 
appear. 

"An advertising man." he states in 
his chapter on The Advertising Tool, 
"like a designer, must control and 
direct his brilliance. A campaign is 
not for the individual expression of 
his ego. It is, actually, a tool, and 
it has functional purpose, which is 
the most complete communication 
with the public, the maximum projec- 
tion of the message. This is the true 
art of advertising. If you will apply 
this criterion to modern advertising 
(advertising is, above all. a tool), 
you will reject much of modern ad- 
vertising." ^ 

RADIO PACKAGE TOUR 

{Continued from page 41) 

the rounds by avid followers of the 
Finch show thus giving the project 
a lot of free promotion. 

The travel agency also did its part 
to play up the tour by hosting a get- 
together pre-view look, via slides, at 
the itinerary during a country club 
party. They followed this up with 
mailing pieces spotlighting Bud 
Finch's part in the plan. The cruise 
carrier — American Export Lines, 
here — backed it all with banners and 
printed materials. 

Contrary to the usual, the promo- 
tion did not end with the start of 
the trip: it was turned instead into a 
daily cruise highlight. The station 
taped cruise progress reports voiced 
by the tourists themselves and air- 
mailed them to the station where they 
were put on the air. These reports, 
as well as direct ship to shore mes- 
sages projected regularly each day 
across the Atlantic was followed 
around the New Haven area by a 
large and interested group of stay-at- 
homers. 

A survey made by the station dur- 
ing that period revealed that an audi- 
ence of some 5.000 were tuned in 



IN ROCHESTER,!*! 

EVERYBODY listens to 
EDMEATH 6-9:30 A.M. 




YOUR WORLD of FACT, 

FASCINATION, 
MUSIC and NEWS ! 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: EVERETT McKINNEY, INC. 




SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



51 



■fl 




REASONS WHY 
FELIX THE CAT 

IS THE BEST 
NEW CARTOON 
ON THE AIR! 

No coincidence that there just 
happen to be 260 episodes 
(four minutes each) in the 
Felix package . . . each 
episode visible and audible 
proof that this is the cartoon 
show for youngsters. 

Produced in 1960-61 in full 
color . . . Felix is his own best 
salesman. See him in action 
and picture him on your sta- 
tion. If contests and give-aways 
with merchandise interest you, 
get ready for a deluge in the 
mail department! 

Felix is made for youngsters. 
You'll have more moppets 
staring at your channel when 
the world's most famous feline 
becomes your cat. 



keeping tabs on cruise-doings. 

The success of the Bud Finch Sun- 
lane Cruise is measured by the sta- 
tion in these two \\a\ s: 

• Monetarily : a six-week spot 
schedule on the Bud Finch show was 
bought (at double A time) by the 
carrier line: and the station has lined 
up a number of potential local adver- 
tisers. 

• Good public relations: the 
cruiser-listener aficionado for the sta- 
tion people has developed to the 
point where, for these broadcasters, 
the social calendar is fast arriving 
at a "standing-room-only" stage. 

Although more than two months 
have passed since the cruise, people 
around New Haven are still talking 
it up. Bud Finch as well as other 
station people constantly encounter 
persons who are apt to come up with 
something folksy like this: "My milk- 
man's sister went on your cruise." 

With so much interest in this type 
of promotion still circulating around 
town, WELI is mulling over plans for 
its next package tour. ^ 




SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 45) 

product advertised should be con- 
fined to the type of programing with 
which it is compatible. Naturalh. 
products should be showcased in or 
adjacent to programs with which 
they have a natural affinity, and sta- 
tions should be more than happy to 
exercise such controls. For example, 
no station would put a shaving cream 
in a women's show. 

But by the same token, the station 
should be allowed to use its judg- 
ment and discretion as to what prod- 
ucts would be compatible with given 
participating shows. We feel that 
the majority of station operators 
have the intelligence and ability to 
do this. 

Harry B. Shaw, V.p., sales director, 
ITSJSTV, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Fortunately for most all print me- 
dia, product conflict is no problem. 
Perhaps this is due to the fact that 
those involved with space sales have 
been able to get the message over of 
"comparative advertising." 

A good many vears ago in radio, 
product protection raised its head 
and has been ever present since. 

With the inception of television 




certain inheritances carried OvJ 
from radio, and product protectiou 
was one of them. 

In m\ capacity as vice-president 
and sales director, it is po>-il>lc to 
exercise control over local, regional 
and national spot product conllict. 
However, with the new techniques 



Inevitable; 
competing 
products often 
prevented front 
getting equal 
exposure 



emplo\ed in the sale of network time, 
over which the station definitely has 
no control, a rash of problems have 
arisen. Cigarettes, for example, are 
participating in a great number of 
programs virtually seven days a 
week across the board. Certain other 
products, using the same techniques, 
fall into this same general category. 

It is an old statement, indeed, that 
those in the print field can always i 
insert another page; but in broad- 
casting there are a fixed number ol 
hours per day, and no man under the 
sun has }et been able to change this 
situation. 

As a result, stations exercising 
minimal protection of fifteen min- 
utes, and others perhaps as much as 
30 minutes, find themselves in a di- 
lemma. 

This dilemma often times resulting 
in the loss of thousands upon thou- 
sands of advertising dollars because 
of product conflict. 

At the same time, when a number 
of product conflict situations arise, 
under the general system broadly 
employed by broadcasters with re- 
gard to product protection, a goodly 
number of certain other advertisers 
are excluded from facility use be- 
cause of this most unique situation, 
to say the least. 

In my judgment, all advertising is 
comparative advertising and whether 
a viewer or listener prefers one soft 
drink in preference to another or a 
certain cigarette brand over another 
brand is up to the individual to de- 
cide. 

Therefore. I believe, in this fabu- 
lous year of the challenging "(>0"s. 
certainly the era of strict product 
protection as we have known it in 
the past, is doomed for a demise in 
the not too distant future. % 



52 



SPONSOR 



24 April 1961 



THE 



QUALITY 



TOUCH 




An unbeatable combination of 
great facilities and staff "know- 
how" make it profitable and 
practical to use WFAA-TV, 
Dallas, for those "on-location" 
commercials, as well as cover- 
age of any major event for spon- 
sored telecasting. 

This fabulous 40' custom-built 
AMPEX VIDEOTAPE 
CRUISER contains 2 Ampex 
Video-Tape machines and 6 
Marconi 4*/^" image orthicon 
cameras along with the latest 
inter-sync and inter-switch 
equipment. With its own power 
supply, the WFAA VIDEO- 
CRUISER can go anywhere . . . 
no distance too great, no job too 
large. Call on us next time ; we 
love challenges! 



On location for Shell Oil (Kenyon & Eckhardt) at Pasadena, Texas 
1 



WFAA 



DALLAS 
FT. WORTH 




Channel 8 



61 



Represented by 
(Edwatd I Pelry 4 |Co.. Inc.) 

The Original Station Representatii 



TELEVISION SERVICE OF 
THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 




SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



53 



SPONSOR 
WEEK 

WRAP-UP 



THREE BARRELS were requisitioned to launch the WNDU-TV, South Bend, Ind. "Sweep- 
stakes" contest. The 53,000 entries overflowed from their own into a Notre Dame-donated 
one and promotion manager, Wally Purcell's addition. Four WNDU staffers count the entries 




Advertisers 




SUBSTANTIAL INTEREST in Teleglobe Pay-Tv System is acquired by Macfadden 
Publications. Approving agreement (l-r): Solomon Saga 1 1, pres. of Teleglobe; Gerald Bartell, 
pres. of Macfadden and Bartell Broadcasting Corp.; Irving Manheimer, chmn. ofbd., Macfadden 







Revlon (Grey) is pretty well set 
as an alternate Meek sponsor of 
the Ed Sullivan show next season. 

This is contingent on Revlon's buy] 
ing an alternate half hour ol another 
show on the same network. 

The account will also sponsor a 
couple specials during the 19(>l-62 
season. 

The total hillings for the season of 
the entire hatch, as estimated bl 
SPONSOR: $7.5 million. 

The advertising department of 
Helena Rubinstein denies the re- 
port that it's bending an ear to 
agency solieitations. 

Assures the account: it's verj had 
py with its Ogilvy, Benson \ M it lit is 
relations and quite excited with an 
agency-prepared "'show that its 
about to put on the road. 

King Louis Shirts, through Potts- 
Woodbury, has bought Walter 
Schw immer's Championship 
Bowling in five markets for a 



MAD MONEY Karnival and Auction put on 
by WGAN was lots of fun for Portland, 
Me., citizens. Over $2,000,000 in play 
money was spent on stuffed animals, dolls, 
and kiddie rides. No real money, just mad 




SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1%1 



summertime campaign. 

The show, now in its eighth con- 
secutive year, has heen sold to tv sta- 
tions in some 50 markets for spring 
and summer runs. 



Campaigns: 

• B. F. Goodrich has a tv and 

radio spot saturation campaign going 
in 35 markets to push its new theme 
—The Big Edge. The campaign is a 
12-week run. Agency: BBD&O. 

• Best Foods, division Corn Prod- 
ucts, is readying a large-scale pro- 
motion for its Niagara Instant Laun- 
dry Starch. The Niagara washer 
starching story will be told on six 
CBS TV shows: Double Exposure, 
Face the Facts, Video Village, The 
Millionaire, Brighter Day and As the 
World Turns. Agency: Lennen & 
Newell. 

• Cities Service Oil this month 
launched a new ad campaign featur- 
ing the Big Gallon, Tv buys: spots in 
some 24 markets, 8 to 12 weeks dura- 
tion. Flights starting time: 17 April 
and 18 September. Radio buys: spots 
in 41 kev markets in the company's 



37-state marketing territory, starting 
in May and running for 21 weeks. 
Agency : Lennen & Newell. 

• Oldsmohile will break out its 
F-85 Cutlass sports coupe promotion 
10 May on radio via CBS' Lowell 
Thomas newscast over 200 stations. 
Agency : D. P. Brother. 



Acquisition: Ford takes over Auto- 
lite (BBD&O) ; Ford's agency, JWT, 
has the Champion Sparkplug ac- 
count. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

George Fenmore, from public rela- 
tions and publicity director, Blaine- 
Thompson, N.Y.C. to advertising and 
public relations director, Ideal To} 
Corp. . . . Chester L. Jones, from 
director sales, resin products, to as- 
sistant director marketing, and Ed- 
mond S. Bauer, from product ad- 
ministrator, resins and coatings, to 
director sales, resin products, both 
Plastics division. Monsanto Chemical, 
Springfield. Mass. . . . George A. 
Mentzer, from advertising manager. 



B. F. Goodrich Chemical Co., to ad- 
vertising manager. B. F. Goodrich. 

Afif£tlCi&S 

Agency appointments: Warman 
Precision Productions (tape record- 
ers, hi-fi equipment ) to Friend- 
Reiss, New York City . . . 0. M. Scott 
& Sons, Marysville, Ohio (lawn care 
products — about si million) to Geer, 
DuBois & Coe, New York City, 
from Young & Rubicam ... 4 Fisher- 
men Products. Fulham Brothers, to 
Hicks, Greist & O'Brien . . . Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical, N.Y.C. to Weiss 
& Geller . . . Schulze and Burch Bis- 
cuit. Chicago, to Roche, Rickerd & 
Cleary . . . Hilton Hotels, to Mc- 
Cann-Erickson for its resort hotels 
in the Caribbean area, Mexico, Pana- 
ma, and Hawaii . . . Roche Labora- 
tories, div. Hoffmann-La Roche, Nut- 
ley, N. J. to Kastor, Hilton, Ches- 
ley, Clifford & Atherton . . . Hoff- 
man Candy (Cup-O-Gold Candy Bar), 
to Anderson-McConnell, Los An- 
geles . . . TreeSweet Products ( frozen 
and ready-to-eat citrus juices, and 




BANNER HOISTED for WBC Conference 
on Public Service Programing by Pittsburgh 
Mayor Joseph M. Barr (I) and Westing- 
house Broadcasting v. p. Harold C. Lund. 
This year's conference on "Changing world" 



SPONSOR 



21 APRIL 1961 




POWER INCREASE for 

WBRE, Wilkes-Barre. Pa., 
for daytime to 1,000 watts 
was cause for ceremony by 
(l-r): Mayor Frank Slattery 
of Wilkes-Barre; Bob Schu- 
macher, WBRE program di- 
rector; Burgess W. Martin 
of Kingston, Pa. and Fred 
W. Foerster, promotion di- 
rector of WBRE (AM-FM-TV) 



LOONEY SCHOOL, an educa- 
tional Reeves Broadcasting pro- 
gram idea (currently on WHTN- 
TV Huntington, W. Va., and 
WUSN-TV, Charleston, S. C). 
combines educational programing 
with cartoons for pre-school chil- 
dren. 'Miss Shirley' runs the school, 
and plans its daily opening theme 



^1 



drinks I. Santa Ana. Calif, to Eisa- 
ii 1. 1 11. Johns & Laws . . . Sta-Nu 
Magic i li(]uid spray sizing), Chica- 
go, to Vt ad*'. 

More agency appointments: To 
Grey, all of Revlon's fragrance busi- 
ness. I SI million I Warwick Legler 
had part of it . . . Faberge I perfum- 
ers) to Papert, Koenig, Lois. 

Tliisa 'n' data: Philip I. Ross 
Company, New York Citv. lias aflili- 
ated itself with the First Advertising 
Vgencj Croup. 

New quarters: Lamhert & Feas- 
ley, at 850 Third Avenue, New York 
Cit\ . . . Wade, New 1 ork office, at 
10 Rockefeller Plaza . . . Foote, 
('one & Beldinjj, Hollywood, to 
the agency's Los Angeles office. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

Richard R. Rout h. Jr., from adver- 
tising and sales promotion director. 
\ii temp Division. Chrysler, to v.p. 
and account supervisor. Grant . . 
Robert G. Minicus, to account ex- 
ecutive, P. Ballentine account. Estv 
. . . Joseph R. Rollins, Jr., from 



v.p. Kampmann Advertising, to Wer- 

men & Schorr. Philadelphia, as senior 
account executive . . . Graeme Mac- 
leod, from v.p. Gumbinner, to v.p. 
account executive. Dancer-Fitzgerald 
. . . Joseph J. Seregny, promoted to 
account supervisor, Detroit office, 
^ oung & Ruhicam . . . Mrs. Lisheth 
Sherman, to assistant account execu- 
tive, and (Charles Carolus to account 
executive. Evans i oung \\ yatt, Dallas 
. . . Graham G. Berry, from Cun- 
ningham & Walsh, to senior copy 
writer. Adams \ Keyes . . . Edward 
T. Johnson, to manager. Los An- 
geles office Glenn Advertising . . . 
Robert S. Hughes, to v.p. general 
manager Reno office. The Melvin 
Company. 

MORE PEOPLE ON THE MOVE : 

James F. Ewing, from account as- 
sistant to account supervisor. Ketch- 
urn. MacLeod & Grove. Pittsburgh 
. . . Frank R. Ludik. from research 
department, and Charles W. Rus- 
sell, from v.p. and account super- 
visor, Buchen Advertising, both to 
account executives, Needham. Louis 
and Brorby. Chicago . . . Robert J. 
Barrett, from Dunnan & Jeffry, 




AD MEN PUT 

ON THE MAP... 

your ad headquarters in Chicago at 
71 E. WACKER DRIVE 

Chicago's finest hotel, within 
walking distance of over 5 Billion ;Sl 
Dollars in ad billing. C 

PRIVATE MEETING AND £ 

BANQUET FACILITIES 

Visit Executive House Dining Room 
and Cocktail Lounge 



<K*Jti 



LI'rhlHT'lHirr - 



H'H.l'.I Hi i mil fig 




• — ITT3 



DBBT 
» i i: i . ' ni i i:ii. ' jni ii«iniwiiiriiiii i, ' , i j ; ij!Mi i , i m, ' ,H ; » / ^fffBi 



N.\ .('... to media department, radio/ 
tv research bureau, Ayer, Philadelphia 
. . . Curtis Berrien, from v.p. coJ 
director. I.slv. to senior v.p. creative 
director. Lennen & Newell . . . Sal 
Greco from advertising manages 
Rav mond Rosen, to account execu-j 
live, \drian Bauer & Alan Tripp. Inc.,. 
Philadelphia . . . Sanford Levy, 
Dudley Whittelsey and Jack Feni- 
more, to producers, commercial 
broadcast production department. 
Bates . . . Norma Strassman. from 
head estimator, DSC&S. to radio-tv 
timebuyer, Chirurg & Cairns . . JJ 
John V. Sandburg. J. Walter 
Thompson. Chicago, named (hair- 
man. Chicago Council of Amei i< an 
Association of Advertising \genciefl 

They were elected v.p.'s : Anthony 
Azzato, at Swan & Mason . . . EI- 
wood C. Ratliffe, at Foote. Cone & 
Belding, Chicago . . . Frank M. 
Leonard, at Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sam- 
ple . . Sherman J. McQueen, at 
Foote. Cone & Belding. L.A. . . . 
Bren Kelley, at Benton & Bowles 
. . . Peter J. Clancy, Robert W. 
Schwarting and Henry M. Steph- 
enson, all at Albert Frank-Guenther 
Law. as assistant v.p.'s. 

Stations on the Move 



TOTAL STATIONS ON THE AIR 

(as of 1 March 1961) 
AM: 3.556 
FM: 839 
TV: 541 

BOUGHT/SOLD/APPROVED : 
Bought: WGIR, Manchester. Y II.. 
hv Xorman Knight from Emile J. 
Girolimon: price: $327,500 . . . 
KTRC, Sante Fe, New Mexico, hv 
Carl S. Goodwin, from Garfield C. 
Packard: brokered by Hamilton-Lan- 
dis & Associates; price: $100,000 . . . 
WSAI Radio and FM, Cincinnati, by 
Jupiter Broadcasting, from Consoli- 
dated Sun Ray; price: $1.2 million 
. . . KSLY, San Luis Obispo. Calif.. 
by Berry Broadcasters, Inc.. from Rex 
(). Stevenson, president Western Col 
tract Furnishers, San Francisco: bro- 
kered hv Blackburn & Co., Washing- 
ton. D. C; price: $50,000 . . . 
WRVM, Rochester, N. Y. hv a coJ 
panv owned by James M. John-ton 
and Francis G. Taylor of Watertovwi. 
\. Y. from State Broadcasting ("". 
Inc.: brokered by Hamilton-Land i- & 
Associates; price: $400,000.00. 



56 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



TIE IN WITH WTVT 
TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG 

Now 32nd in Food 
Store Sales* 




tffyKJK^r Within the 

-^OJJSS^ m^m m metropolitan Tampa Bay 

I ' " ~iK " K*fl W^ area, dominated by Station 

Jgjj^M WTVT, yearly food store sales 

total a whopping . . . 

*223,901,000 

The total 21-countyarea served by WTVT 
brings yearly food sales to a total of . . . 

$ 43! T 880,000 

SHARE OF AUDIENCE 43.3% 

Latest ARB 9:00 A.M. - Midnight 

CHECK THE TOP 50 SHOWS! 

ARB NIELSEN 
WTVT 34 WTVT 38 

Station B 15 Station B ...12 

Station C 1 Station C 

A.R.B., Tampa -St. Petersburg Metro Area, Nov., 1960, 2-week summary. 
N.S.I., Tampa - St. Petersburg Metro Area, Dec, 1960, 4-week average . 

* Copr. 1961. Sales Management Survey of Buying Power: further reproduction not licensed. 

YES, IT PAYS TO TIE IN WITH Wf |\f T 

STATION ON THE MOVE IN THE MARKET ON THE MOVE 
TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG 

THE WKY TELEVISION SYSTEM, INC. WKY-TV WKY-RADI0' OklahomaCity Represented by the Katz Agency 



PONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



57 



Tv Stations 

\\ IBC-TV, New York < it>. is let- 
ting it be known there will he no 
special discount for summertime 
advertisers. 

\\ ^BC-TV's position, according to 
general sales manager James I.. 
Szabo : 

• The present structure of the sta- 
tion's ialc card. was specifically de- 
signed to give advertisers the oppor- 
tunit) ol buying -pots under various 
plans which automatically lake into 
account the fluctuations of audience 
circulation from one rale classification 
to another, and from one season to 
another. 

• There i- no reason for stations 
to cut rale- now or at an) other time 
or to extend discounts to buyers. If 
more stations followed the philosophy 
of the 7 11 plan, advertisers and 
agencies would he relieved of the 
problems they face each summer. 

Peabody Awards, for locally pro- 
duced radio-tv programs, went 
to these stations: 
WOOD, WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids. 
Mich. — "for imaginative programing 



on a wide range of subjects, national 
and international, including such di- 
verse themes as 11 asted World, a 
stud) in depth of local skidrow prob- 
lems: Red China -Awakening Giant, 
and l//\ 7 the Plan to ('.limine the 

!/ orUr 

KPEK. Los Angeles— "for outstand- 
ing program series: Arming to Par- 
ley. The Largest Question . \oi Mere- 
ly a Business, and numerous chil- 
dren's programs featuring hooks, mu- 

sic, and the theatre." 

WCK.T, Miami "for responsible 

leadership in the prompt analysis and 
exposure of problems incident to the 
Cuban crisis through such program- 
as Compass Points South, Cuba on 
the Move, and Leave or Stay. 
W CCO-TV, Minneapolis — "in recog- 
nition of several distinguished locally 
produced programs including I rated 
Mothers, Sister Kenny Scandal, and 
Capsule Fashion Course. 
Peabody radio entertainment 
award went to WQXR, New 
York City "for its Musical Spec- 
taculars and its total programing of 
music." 

Radio children's program award 
to WNYC, New York City, Ireene 



W icker "brings to her progran 
The Singing Lady, literate taste, ten 
der understanding, wit. gaiety, am 
style." 



TO&vte. Site... M 



Can you find a 

Two station television market (both VHF) 

Where ONE STATION WINS 

442 of 499 total quarter - hours 

In TOTAL AUDIENCE? 

That's the performance of - - - - 







CHANNEL 



IN AUGUSTA GEORGIA 

ARB AUGUSTA CA., NOV. 1960 



Ideas at work : 

• WTIC. Pittsburgh, promoted th 

debut of it- new evening series Th 
Third Man — 1>\ staging an elev en-da 
city-wide hunt. The idea: viewfl 
were asked to locate WIIC's thin 
man — an actor hired by the station t 
roam about the city. A cash prize I 
$100 was given to the first person i 
each of five designated areas to sa 
the man. The tie-in promotion 

"wanted" posters were displayed i 
shopping (enter-: more than In. no 

"wanted" leaflets were distributed i 
downtown Pittsburgh by two model 
sporting police hats and badges; an 
an on-the-air spot announcement 
barrage with The Third Man musi 
theme as background. 

Kudos: The National Safeh Com 
cil public interest award for 1% 
went to these stations: WGR-T\ 
Buffalo. \. V: WLOS-TV, Greei 
ville, S. C: and WKJG-TV, Fo 

Wayne, Ind WRBL-TV, ColuB 

bus, Ga., station manager Ridle\ Me 
presented with award of appreciate 
by the Columbus Lions Club. 

Thisa 'n' data: I. C. Elman Cc 
Cincinnati, Ohio. v.p. Morris ( 
Levin, sponsors of kiddie show- < 
WKRC-TV and WCPO-TV in th 
i it\. praised tv as "the quickest, mo 
effective means of introducing ne 
products." . . . G.E. is coming bat 
into the color tv set business. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Job 

McArdle, v.p. general managl 
WTTG, Washington, D. C, promod 
to newly created post. v.p. director 
sales. Metropolitan Broadcasting - 
stations . . . Don Colee, from \. 
general manager. WTVH, Peoria. 
v.p. general manager \\ I 10. Was 
ington, D. C. . . . Lee Colee. fm 
general sales manager. WTVH. F 
oria, to similar post, WTTG, Was 
ington . . . Seymour Eaton. fr< 
account executive, Peters. Griffl 
Woodward, to national sales ma 
ager, WJBK-TV, Detroit . . . Krai 
Mangan, from Chicago office. M 
TV Spot Sales, to director tv sak. 
\\ RCV-TV, Philadelphia . . . Job 
J. Hevwood, from director busind 



58 



SPONSOR 



24 APRIL 10l 






flairs, NBC TV, to v.p. and treasur- 
r, Crosley Broadcasting, Cincinnati 
. . Chuck Olsen, from WITI-TV, 
Milwaukee, to promotion director, 
^SM-TV, Nashville, Tenn. 



LMOX, St. Louis, general man- 
ger Robert F. Hyland, speaking 
lefore the Illinois Broadcasters 
Lssociation at Springfield last 
feek, urged broadcasters to look 
leyond the programing confines 
if the top forty list and a disk 
ockey's patter. 
Major points in his talk: 

• Radio is not a medium of the 
ast, but the medium of the future, 
be only medium capable of keeping 
ace with our growing mobile popu- 
ition. 

• Listeners need not be underesti- 
nated. they will not only accept but 
/ill literally demand increasingly 
ligher program levels. 

deas at work: 

• KYW, Cleveland, has set up a 
ele-Check system which allows bro- 
ers, salesmen, retail store managers 
nd other interested parties to hear 
xamples of an advertiser's current 
<r upcoming commercial just by dial- 
ng a phone number. Three separate 
elephone message repeater units are 
n use with one announcement per 
Init. A KYW personality introduces 
he spot and follows it up with details 
»f the schedule, how often the spot is 
un. the number of people reached 
nd other pertinent data. The mes- 
ages, on tape, vary in length and 
're changed weekly for freshness. 

• WOLF, Syracuse, N. Y., in an 
[ffort to create a bit of fund-raising 
xcitement for the Easter Seal Cam- 
paign, ran a stunt which kept its dee- 
ay Ron Roberts "sealed" in the stu- 
lio for 24 hours. Ron stayed on the 
ir throughout the day asking for 
ontributions and at the end of his 
ncarceration tallied up a total of 
a ,000. 

Vudos: The National Safety Coun- 
il public interest award went to these 
'rations: KMOX, St. Louis; W.IL, 
ft Louis; WRIT, Milwaukee; 
VHYE, Roanoke. Va.; KRIZ, Phoe- 
•ix; . . . KDWB, Minneapolis; 
nd WSB, Atlanta, Ga. . . . 



WJBK, Detroit, recipient of the De- 
troit Educational Television and Ra- 
dio Council 1960-61 outstanding se- 
ries award . . . KDWB, Minneapolis, 
general manager John M. McRae, 
initiated into membership of the Sam- 
uel C. Gale Chapter Alpha Delta Sig- 
ma, a national professional advertis- 
ing fraternity. 

Thisa V data: WPAT, Paterson, 
N. J., had a 16% increase in billings 
during the first quarter of this year 
over the same period 1960 . . . 



KFAX, San Francisco, has started 
construction on a modernization pro- 
gram to increase its power from 1,000 
to 50.000 costing more than $150,- 
000 . . . WWRL, New York City, 
staff member Lou Cole, retiring after 
some 30 years with the station . . . 
Mutual Radio which put this ques- 
tion — does a surge in fast-breaking 
news events influence retail sales of 
radio sets? — to six major chain stores 
buyers, reports that all were agreed 
in this: set sales were up. 
I Please turn to page 65 I 




PONSOR 



24 april 1961 



59 



■HH 



o 




KMJ-TV, Fresno's first tele- 
vision station, emphasizes 
quality programming. To an 
extensive film library already 
stocked with MGM classics, 
KMJ-TV has added the superb 
WARNER BROTHERS FILMS 
OF THE '50's. These post-1950 
features are one more reason 
KMJ-TV attracts the big 
Fresno tv audience. 

Any way you measure a TV 
station buy, KMJ-TV rates 
high. Take a look — and re- 
member that this market is 
worth winning: the Number 
One agricultural income Coun- 
ty of the Nation. 




. . first TV Station 

in 

the Billion-Dollar 

Valley 

of the Bees 



§Sf$S* 



GO FIRST CLASS 



Wl 



+h KMJ*TV 



RRES INI O 



C/XLI ROF* INI l/\ 



McCLATCHY BROADCASTING COMPANY 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



00 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1% 




What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



24 APRIL 196! 

Oonrlfht IMI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Network option time may be out the window. 

The FCC, fighting in the Appeals Court for validation of its order cutting a half-hour 
from option time, had a 17 April deadline for filing arguments. Instead of filing, it asked 
for an extension until 21 April. It said it had its brief ready for filing, but wanted to consid- 
er whether to withdraw the order. 

If the FCC does withdraw the order to cut a half -hour from option time, it would 
be no victory for the networks. The order was adopted by a 4-3 vote. The minority 
wasn't in favor of keeping option time as it is, but wanted to kill the practice entirely. Com- 
missioner King was the deciding vote in favor of option time. Minow will now substitute for 
King in the voting, and is considered certain to go the other way. 

The only question now appears to be whether the Commission majority will want to re- 
open the option time case this quickly. 



Already in the works is "an appropriate order" which would give the Federal 
government the right to take over any non-government frequency in "the event of 
extreme emergency." 

The order is in the drafting stage. It is expected to be released at almost any time. All 
radio and tv stations could be affected, as could any of the many other services which 
use the spectrum. 

The Federal Trade Commission will get tougher with advertising, rather than 
relaxing its efforts: that was the word from new chairman Paul Rand Dixon, who 
was expected to concentrate on antimonopoly activities. 

Addressing the spring meeting of the Association of National Advertisers last week, the 
new FTC chief said "faster and heavier firing guns" would be used against false and 
misleading ads. He said unnamed devices would be used to attack practices while consum- 
ers were still being hurt, rather than "finger wagging" years later. 

Dixon was obviously nettled by speculation to the effect that his appointment would mean 
the FTC would expand in the antitrust field in which he is an expert, meanwhile minimiz- 
ing other activities. 

The Dixon emphasis on quick action re false ads indicates that he may push for 
passage of a bill giving the FTC such rapid cease-and-desist powers. 

This would allow the commission to order ads off the air or out of print pending 
conclusion of cases against them. At present it's a long process. 

What the advertising business can expect is closer cooperation between the FTC and the 
FCC on action against commercials which come under Government attack. 

Dixon has not yet mentioned the business of making stations parties to false ad action — 
a favorite theme of his predecessor, Earl Kintner — but FTC insiders have the impression that 
things are moving in that direction. 

Not that stations or networks will be expected to maintain testing laboratories, or to be- 
come expert enough to test ad claims. 

Like that expressed within the FCC, the apparent intent is, if practical, to put the FTC in 
a position to call stations to account if they are suspected of knowing about dishon- 
esty. (Obviously, no easy task.) 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



61 







Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



24 APRIL 1961 

Owrifht INi 

IPONHR 

PUiUOATIOM IMC. 



ABC's pioneer international commercial tv network, CATVN, is doing a big ts 
film business with Central American branches of U. S. advertisers. 

The network covers TI-TVCR, Costa Rica; YSEB-TV, El Salvador; HRTG, Honduras; 
TG-BOL-TV, Guatemala, and YNSA, Nicaragua. 

Two new shows of U. S. origin will be added in May. 
They are: 

• Charles Boyer Theater, sponsored by Admiral (Henri, Hurst & McDonald), and Mu- 
rine and J. B. Williams (both JWT). 

• Dick Powell Theater for Westinghouse (Gotham-Vladimir), S. C. Johnson, and Indus- 
tria Quimica of Guatemala. 

The sense of inactivity is coming home to some of the syndicators with all the 
force of an electric shock. 

After you list MCA's push for full-hour re-runs and CNP's delving into pre-sold participa- 
tions in children's shows there's very little new to be accomplished by established major syn- 
dicators in recent weeks. 

By contrast, smaller and newer syndicators are showing more ingenuity: Trans- 
Lux Tv's station program distribution project and TPI's production and pre-selling efforts with 
cartoons, for example. 

Questions you hear raised in the trade: (1) What does the current season have that's 
novel or unique, compared to last year during the first spring of the current syndication re- 
adjustment? (2) And even in tried-and-true action-adventure, what have we lately more than 
one show. Ziv-UA's King of Diamonds? 



Sterling has kicked off sales of Adventure Theater with six station sales. 

Stations are: KTVU, San Francisco; WLW-T, Cincinnati; WBNS-TV, Columbus; WSBT 
TV, South Bend; WMBS-TV, Lansing, and WHAS-TV, Louisville. 

Series draws on materials produced in various parts of the world; 39 of its 78 half- 
hour episodes are in color. 



Ziv-UA reports 18 more stations for King of Diamonds, added to the 33 mar- 
kets purchased by three regional beer advertisers. 

The latest stations are: WHDH-TV, Boston; KABC-TV, Los Angeles; WJBK-TV, Detroit; 
KTVK, Phoenix; KBOI-TV, Boise; KOA-TV, Denver; KERO-TV, Bakersfield; KLAS-TV, 
Las Vegas; KVAL-TV, Eugene; KOGO-TV, San Diego; WGR-TV, Buffalo; WFGA-TV, Jack- 
sonville; WTVH, Peoria; WTVP, Decatur; WALB-TV, Albany, Ga.; WJHG-TV, Panama City; 
WAVY-TV, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and WCSH-TV, Portland, Me. 



62 



Pilot casualties are especially heavy this year among syndicators who made up 
a batch of network offerings only to have then* entire menu refused so far. 

But these pilots won't be written off as a total loss. Look for some of the shows to make 
their appearance as syndicated entries probably within the next few weeks. 

SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



CBS Films' Phil Silvers is having some of the success of The Honeymooners in 
its re-run ratings. 

Both shows had impressive ratings in the 7 p.m. slot on WNBC-TV, New York. 

Phil Silvers averaged 13.4 Nielsen and 12.6 ARB from October 1959 through February 
1961 — but the ratings mounted the longer the re-runs were on the air. 

During the latest three months it averaged 17.9 and 15.5 (Nielsen and ARB) compared 
to 14.2 and 14.1 a year ago, and most recent month reports are still higher, 18.8 and 16.0 

CBS Films notes that Silvers re-runs now have higher ratings than all first runs 
in the WNBC-TV 7 p.m. daily syndication strip, including Shotgun Slade, Mr. Ed, and 
Lock Up. 

Tv Marketeers will take over distribution of Waterfront and make it available 
for daytime stripping. 

The series of 78 episodes, produced by Roland Reed, was acquired by MCA when it ab- 
sorbed UTP properties and personnel in 1954. Wynn Nathan, then sales chief of UTP, is 
also now head of Tv Marketeers. 

MGM-TV confirmed that it would make available for tv the first batch of post- 
1948 MGM features at the NAB convention. 

Unlike the older MGM features, which were sold to stations as an entire library, the new 
releases will be grouped into packages. 

The UN is now showing tv films as well as movies to entertain its forces in the 
Gaza Strip and the Congo. 

CBS Films offered episodes from Robert Herridge, Phil Silvers, Air Power, Deputy 
Dawg, and Range Rider. UN officials later requested these shows: I Love Lucy, Perry Mason, 
20th Century, Wanted Dead or Alive, Gunsmoke, Dragnet, Bob Cummings, 77 Sunset Strip, 
Perry Como, Dinah Shore and Ernie Ford. 

The freak of poor tv reception in places such as Port Jervis, N. Y., has led to 
community antenna systems and locally wired tv transmission which easily lends 
itself to all sorts of testing projects. 

The Center For Research in Marketing of Peekskill, N. Y., uses this "closed circuit" home 
audience to test commercials right in the home and reports test results with its CC/TV 
measurement drastically different from those obtained by other methods, such as theatre screen 
testing with "captive" audiences. 

Animation salaries have increased substantially in the last 10 or 15 years, ac- 
cording to minim urns reported in the April newsletter of Screen Cartoonists Lo- 
cal 841 

Here are minimums for three representative years for nine jobs: 

category 1944 1950 1960 

Animators $90.00 $125.00 $178.61 

Story 75.00 125.00 178.61 

Layout 125.00 178.61 

Camera 70.00 103.00 146.63 

Background 75.00 112.50 159.86 

Asst. Animators 55.00 75.00 110.25 

Inbetweeners 32.00 50.00 93.71 

Inkers 29.00 48.00 82.69 

Painters 26.00 45.00 71.66 

ponsor • 24 APRIL 1961 63 









A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 




SPONSOR HEARS 



24 APRIL 1961 

C»#yrl|ht IMI 

IPONWR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The Katz Agency seems to be gradually moving toward making up for the sock 
it took from the exit of the Storer tv stations. 

In the area of major markets it's already hauled in Louisville and St. Louis and reports 
have it that the rep has a good chance of adding Miami and Schenectady. 



Lots of timebuyers may not be aware of it, but they're entitled to choose be- 
tween old and new rate cards when a station changes its time classification and 
thereby raises its rates. 

A rep last week interposed an objection to an agency exercising this species of dual pro- 
tection and was told that a technicality in the Four A's contract supports such choice or 
straddling. 

It's been one of those program selling seasons where deals in several instances > 
were consummated without the benefit of pilots. 

Examples: the new Robert Young show, Top Cat. Calvin & the Colonel — and. possibly, I 
the new version of Ichabod. 



Here's what you might call an index to how the stations esteem the function 
performed by the BPA (John Hurlbut, WFBM, Indianapolis;, president) : 

Within six weeks after the membership bills went out payments were in from 85' < of the 
350 stations. 

Top management in a leading New York agency is taking a long hard look at 
it9 tv department. 

Its action stems from a suspicion some of the recent client crises are materially due to 
recommendations and general effectiveness of that department. 

As more and more station groups are getting in the business of representing 
themselves in national spot, upper grade salesmen find themselves in an enviable 
spot. 

The groups have been making plenty of passes at rep manpower, but the heads of major 
rep firms say they're gratified by the fact that their choice people are not picking fl^ 
the bids. 



It would be interesting in mid 1961-62 season to take a reading on the shows 
submitted by sponsors which the tv networks either rejected completely or accept 
ed under pressure. 

Four new series fall within this description. Of the three totally thumbed-down two hav< 
found homes on the competition. 

Anent the repercussions over ABC TV's grant of 40-second station breaks, on« 
Madison Avenue wag had this comment: 

"Some of the agencies that are protesting the loudest are the same agencies that have 
been telling stations they require longer spots for their sales message." 



64 



SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



WRAP-UP 

'Continued from page 59) 

Sappy birthday: WWRL, New 

fork City, celebrating its 35th anni- 
versary this August . . . WWDC, 
Washington, D. C. celebrating its 20th 
)roadcasting year, 3 May. 

'EOPLE ON THE MOVE: Henry 

5. Hovland, from Paul H. Chapman 
]o., to v.p. and general manager, 
WBEC, Pittsfield, Mass. . . . Grady 
:ole, WBT, Charlotte, N. C, air 
>ersonality, appointed special assist- 
mt to Charles H. Crutchfield, general 
nanager Jefferson Standard Broad- 
:asting . . . Thomas M. Lawrence, 
rom automotive markets and mer- 
ihandising manager, Look magazine, 
o sales staff, WRCV, Philadelphia 
. . Ray Watson, from sales staff, 
CVNI, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, to sales 
epresentative, KGO, San Francisco, 
ind William Cancilla, from mer- 
handising director, KNBC, San 
^rancisco, to similar post, KGO . . . 
rerrence S. Ford, promoted from 
issistant to director promotion, WHK, 
\M and FM, Cleveland . . . Franklin 
EL Small, from sales manager, WIL, 
5t. Louis, to assistant general man- 
iger, WAVI, Dayton, Ohio. 

HORE PEOPLE ON THE MOVE : 

Fay L. Spurgeon, from account ex- 
:cutive, to station manager, KMEO, 
3maha . . . Tony Temple, from 
general manager KVNA, Flagstaff, 
Arizona, to account executive, KOWN, 
^scondido, Calif. . . . Margaret Nel- 
son, from Gardner to WTOP, Washi- 
ngton, as director of promotion, pub- 
icity and public service . . . Stuart 
]. Hepburn, president and general 
nanager KNOK, Fort Worth-Dallas, 
elected v.p. TCA Broadcasting Corp. 
[KNOW, Denver, KITE, San Antonio, 
iVKDA, Nashville). 



rhe tv rights to the Orange Bowl 
»ame after ten-years with CBS, 
is now with ABC, for the next 
three years. 

ABC is paying $250,000 per year, 
rhe programing package, sponsor 
estimates, will come to $400,000. 

The Peabody Awards committee, 
it a RTES luncheon meeting in 
\ew York City last week, hon- 




SPONSOR • 24 APRIL 1961 



65 



Aft 



r. ¥. spot editor 

Sponsored by one of the 
leading Jilm proiluvers in television 




The charm of Gisele MacKenzie's voice in a 
modern penthouse setting, tells an effective 
story of discriminating smokers' preference 
for du MAURIER. 

Produced by 
B. HOUDE & CROTHE LIMITED through 
VICKERS & BENSON LTD. 



&»*Z. 




\ backyard fence, a moonlight night, and two 
black cats played by "Thorn Cat" and "Thorn 
Kitt>" act out a romantic interlude. The com- 
bination of ^alentino Sarra's direction and 
the artistry of Puppeteer Bil Baird does an ex- 
ceptional selling job for Thorn McAn Shoes. 

V A A t &MM+T 

Produced by ^r for 

MELVILLE SHOE CORPORATION through 
DOYLE DANE BERNBACH INC. 



ored CBS's Frank Stanton with 
a Special Award for "his initia- 
tive in suggesting the debates 
(The Great Debates) and his 
courageous leadership in bring- 
ing ahout the joint resolution of 
Congress which made the debates 
possible."' 

Other Peabody network awards: 
Television news: The Texaco Hunt- 
ley-Brinkley, Report, NBC. 
Television entertainment: The Fabu- 
lous Fifties, CBS. 

Television education: White Paper 
Series, NBC. 

Television youth programs: G-E Col- 
lege Boid. CBS. 

Television children's programs: The 
Sluui Lewis Show, NBC. 
Television contribution to interna- 
tional understanding: 1960 Olympic 
Coverage, CBS. 

Television public service: CBS Re- 
ports. 

Net tv sales: Reynolds Tobacco, 
Thomas Lemming, Union Carbide 
l all F.st j i and Noxzema (SSC&B) 
have bought sponsorship in NBC TV's 
feature film presentation — Your Sat- 
urday Night Movie — scheduled to be- 
gin in September . . . American Gas 
(Lennen & Newell) has bought spon- 
sorship of eight full-hour Selznick 
screen classics (Intermezzo, Rebecca, 
Spellbound, Portrait of Jennie, The 
Paradine Case, The Farmer's Daugh- 
ter, The Spiral Staircase, and Notori- 
ous) on NBC TV, beginning in Oc- 
tober. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

Richard N. Goldstein, NBC legal 
department attorney, appointed direc- 
tor, labor relations, NBC. 



Representatives 

Rep appointments: WSAI, Cin- 
cinnati. Ohio, to Robert E. East- 
man for national representation ex- 
cept for the state of Ohio where the 
station will be handled by the Ohio 
Stations Representatives . . . 
KROY, Sacramento. Calif.. KPMC, 
Bakersfield. Calif., and KYNO, Fres- 
no, Calif., all to Venard. Rintoul & 
MeConnell. 

New quarters: Everett-McKinney, 

at Rockefeller Center, 1270 Avenue of 
the Americas, New York City. 

Promotion ideas at work: Blair- 

TV is attracting New York timebuv- 
er attention to its Detroit station 
WXYZ-TV feature film series, lh>ll\- 
ivood Theatre hosted by Don Ameche, 
by sending out while-you-were-out 
phone message memo's urging them 
to call the listed number. Those who 
follow-through find themselves hear- 
ing all about the series from a record- 
ed Ameche. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Fred 

Adair, from MCA. to manager San 
Francisco office, Robert E. Eastman 
. . . Pat Gatto, from W 1 1 FA-TV. 
Syracuse, N. Y.. to manager Chicago 
office, Bob Dore . . . Jack Sweeney 
from Jann & Kelley, to account exec 
utive. Bob Dore. New York office . . 
Roy W. Hall, from CBS o&o sta 
tions division, to New York Spot Tele 
vision sales staff, Peters, Griffin, 
Woodward . . . Robert J. Horen, 
from Radio-TV Reps, Inc., to Chica- 
go office, radio sales staff. Daren F. 
McGavren . . . Bob Schroeder, from 
account executive. CBS TV Network 




That 4 *Ting-a-ling ta>-te of Tcabcrry Gum is 

different from any other gum" is gaily shown 

with brass band and parade. Stylized sets, a 

cute girl, and old fashioned street car add to 

the picture enjoyment. 

„ , , ^A8#r— " * 

Produced by ^^ for 

CLARK BROTHERS CHEWING GUM 

COMPANY through GARDNER ADVER- 



You can almost smell the pine fragrance in 
the beauty of the outdoor scene, shot on loca- 
tion in North Carolina with a youthful couple 
who help sell New Pine Green Lifebuoy. 

Produced by 4 ^**' ?/ *"ioT 
LEVER BROTHERS COMPANY through 
SULLIVAN, STAUFFER, COLWELL & 
BAYLES, INC. 



The appetizing, sizzling scenes of fryi 
toes, cut to the rhythm of an original 
score, accent this new French's Fryii 
toes spot. 

Produced by 
THE R. T. FRENCH COMPANY trot 
J. WALTER THOMPSON COMPAI* 



^tf* 



Sales, to account executive, Television 
Advertising Representatives, Chicago. 

Film 

Syndicated shows, like other 
forms of entertainment, can be 
nourished by headlines if the 
shows themselves are timely. 

Such a case is Ziv-UA's Man in 
Space series, which appeared on 
CBS TV two seasons ago for Ameri- 
can Tobacco and is now in syndi- 
cated re-runs. 

Ziv-UA's Economee re-run division 
reports a heightened interest in the 
show since the launching of a manned 
space vehicle. 

Sales: Sterling's Adventure Theatre 
to KTVU, San Francisco; WLW-T, 
Cincinnati; WBNS-TV, Columbus; 
WSBT, South Bend; WMBS-TV. Lan- 
sing; and WHAS-TV. Louisville . . . 
Ziv-UA's King of Diamonds to 
WHDH-TV. Boston; KABC-TV. Los 
Angeles; WJBK-TV. Detroit; KTVK. 
Phoenix; KBOI-TV, Boise; KOA-TV. 
Denver; KERO-TV. Bakersfield: 
KLAS-TV. Las Vegas; KVAL-TV. 
Eugene; KOGO-TV. San Diego; 
WGR-TV, Buffalo; WFGA-TV, Jack- 
sonville; WTVH. Peoria; WTVP. 
Decatur; W ALB-TV. Albany, Ga.; 
WJHG-TV, Panama City; WAVY- 
TV. Norfolk-Portsmouth, and WCSH- 
TV. Portland, Me. 

Programs: Tv Marketeers acquired 
re-run distribution of Waterfront. 

Research: CNP's Blue Angels out- 
pointed CBS Films' Brothers Branna- 
gan in Phoenix, where latter series is 
set, in November 1960 Nielsen. 12.0 



to 6.9. A third syndicated entry, 
Rescue 8, scored 10.2. 
Commercials: Music Makers com- 
pletes tv spot for Esquire polish 
(Mogul. Williams & Saylor). 

An expected group of 450 ad 
and media men will get together 
at Chicago's Pick-Congress hotel, 
1 May, to discuss problems in re- 
search, distributing, merchandis- 
ing and advertising in the farm 
market. 

The occasion: the annual Farmar- 
keting Seminar, sponsored by the 
Chicago Area Agricultural Advertis- 
ing Association. 

The theme: Farmarketing in the 
60's. 

Other trade dates: 
5 May, American Women in Radio 
and TV 10th anniversary convention, 
Statler Hilton Hotel. Washington, 
D. C. Speakers: Senate majority lead- 
er Michael J. Mansfield; Secretary of 
Labor Arthur J. Goldberg; Senator 
Maurine Neuberger of Oregon; and 
Representative Frances T. Bolton of 
Ohio. 

30 July-5 August, Educational 
Foundation of the American Woman 
in Radio and TV, mid-career seminar, 
Syracuse LTniversity, Syracuse-, N. Y. 
Topics to be covered: Broadcasting 
and our changing social and cultural 
values; Broadcasting and the chang- 
ing role of government; America's 
changing role in world affairs; Defin- 
ing the audience; Creative program- 
ing and community needs; and, Eco- 
nomics and the business of broadcast- 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56»h STREET 
CHICAGO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 




"What do you want in a gas range?". . . this 
question is answered right on stage as the 
"Tappan Fabulous '400" Gas Range appears as 
if by magic, section by section, to sync with a 
musical score which accents each wish of the 
housewife. ^*#fl— ' 

Produced by ^^ for 

THE TAPPAN COMPANY through KETCH- 
UM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INC. 




With the off-stage voice of "Mr. Goetz" per- 
sonifying the ever familiar "Man in the Street 
Broadcaster," a Tom Poston "Western Thrill- 
er" is developed in one of an amusing series 
of TV commercials for Country Club. 

Produced by ^^^ for 

M. K. GOETZ BREWING CO. through JOHN 
W. SHAW ADVERTISING, INC. 







;llent musical score accents the start of 
for apartment dwellers, as seen from 
idow of a bachelor's apartment. The 
ent of NESCAFE is thus presented in 
Hit, informal manner. 

Produced by ■^^ for 

ESTLE CO., INC. through WILLIAM 
:0MPANY, INC. 



From a jewel box opening, Westinghouse 
"Diamond Jubilee" is brought to the TV 
screen in a high fashion style of photography, 
which serves as an excellent supplement to 
the current print campaign. 

Produced by 4^ for 

WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. 
through McCANN-ERICKSON ADVERTIS- 



Positive photography shows the excellent re- 
sults of using the new Breck Banish Dandruff 
Treatment Cream Shampoo, and gives real 
pictorial meaning to the familiar words 
"Beautiful Hair . . . Breck." 

Produced by 4^ for 

JOHN H. BRECK, INC. through N. W. AYER 
& SON, INC. 



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In Rochester, N.Y. 



People Are 
Switching 



FROM 



"TIRED" Radio 



VYVET 



1280 KC 



• FOR MUSIC THEY LOVE 
• NEWS NAMES THEY KNOW 
• COMPLETE NEWS COVERAGE. 



BASIC NBC AFFILIATE 



WVET RADIO, Rochester 4, N.Y. 

Natl Rep.: Robert E. Eastman & Co., Inc. 



IN TORONTO 




THE 

lOICIt 

SIMCOE 

HOTEL 

Where you feel the 

friendly welcome 

Singles from $7. 50 
Doubles from $11. 50 

For reservations phone EM 2-1848 

Telex 022458 

University at King Street, Toronto 

CANADA: The Lord Elgin, Ottawa 

The Lord Simcoe, Toronto 

CHICAGOi The Sherman 

The Hotels Ambassador 



: 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 




to joining CBS, he served 
Spot Sales; Taylor-Howe 



William W. Firman, eastern sales man- 
ager for CBS Radio network since 1956, 
has been promoted to assistant general sales 
manager. His promotion is part of an ex- 
ecutive reassignment series in keeping with 
CBS' Expansion for the Sixties sales tlieme. 
Firman joined CBS Radio's Chicago sales 
team during 1951. Five years later, he was 
made manager of the Detroit office. Prior 
on the sales staffs of WIND, Chicago; ABC 
Snowden; and western office WOR, N.Y.C. 




Irving D. Holczer, Bulova Watch Com- 
pany consumer products sales manager 
since 1958, has been appointed advertising 
manager for the watch maker firm. During 
his work as consumer products sales man- 
ager, Holczer had responsibility for the de- 
velopment of all promotional and point-of- 
purchase campaigns and materials for the 
nation-wide organization of 18,000 retail 
jewelers who handle Bulova watches, radios and stereophonic phono- 
graphs. He has a B.S. degree in marketing from N. Y. I. 

John Palmer, 14-year broadcast veteran, 
has joined Broadcast Time Sales as western 
new business development manager. Palm- 
er who ran the radio-tv gamut as announce 
er, newscaster, copywriter, actor and sales* 
man. owned and operated the O'Connell- 
Palmer Co. of L.A. and San Francisco 
which he merged with John F. Pearson in 
l { )58. He was Pearson West Coast mana- 
ger at the time of his B.T.S. appointment. In his new capacity^ 
Palmer will supervise new business development of the West Coast; 

Lee Rich, Benton & Bowles director of 
media and a board director, has been 
elected a senior vice-president. Rich, who 
holds a degree in marketing from the Uni- 
versity of Ohio, joined Benton & Bowles 
as an associate media director in 1952. 
He was named a vice-president in 1955, 
and director of media in 1957. Two years 
later, he was elected to the board of di- 
rectors. Prior to his affiliation with B&B, Rich was media directoj 
for Albert Frank-Guenther Law and Win. H. Weintraub Agency! 





sI'oysoi; 



21 APRIL 196 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



'nvestigate uhf properties if they've been operating successfully, advises 
Robert King, vice president and general manager of WTVP, Decatur, III. 
r urning a supposed disadvantage to an advantage, Mr. King points out that 
esearch has shown that uhf can be an efficient video buy through eliminat- 
ng unnecessary overlapping coverage of markets for the advertiser. More 
ntensive coverage, he feels, is another advantageous factor involved in the 
ise of uhf , and proves that more sales can be the result for the advertiser. 




Uhf a potent selling force 



felling uhf television at the national level varies greatly 
rom market to market. Here in Illinois, for example, 
'eoria, an all-uhf city, is treated like any other market 
>ince there is no significant vhf influence and the market 
s 100% uhf-converted. 

There are, however, two other television markets in Illi- 
lois, which are uhf-vhf mixed: Decatur-Springfield and 
ilockford. 

Obviously, though, the same basic considerations for 
naking the buy must apply, i.e., total homes, ratings, cost 
efficiency, network affiliation, availabilities, etc. There 
ivas a time when a uhf property in a mixed market was 
lardly ever considered a national buy. It somehow didn't 
make sense to buy the station that couldn't offer vast cov- 
erage. This, however, is no longer the case, I'm happy to 
report. In the past couple of years, research has become 
highly specialized and has developed to the degree that 
much additional information is now available on a county- 
by-county basis. Sound agency research and close investi- 
gation of the market often reveal that the uhf is the most 
effective and most efficient buy. Procter and Gamble and 
their agencies have been leaders in this strategy. 

A close look at overlapping coverage of the several mar- 
kets in the total buying pattern will frequently show that a 
lot of money is being wasted through excessive and un- 
necessary duplication. The University of Illinois College 
of Commerce, which publishes a monthly Illinois Business 
Review, divides the state into three sectors, northern, cen- 
tral and southern Illinois. 

In Central Illinois, there are three cities which are sig- 
nificant in terms of population, consumer spendable in- 
come, and especially because the most retail dollars are 
being spent there. They are Decatur. Springfield, and 
Peoria, and it will come as a real surprise to some that uhf 
stations in these three cities effectively and totally cover 
the area where about 85% of the total retail dollars in all 
of Central Illinois are being spent. 



There is another important aspect in uhf television 
which cannot always be achieved by large coverage sta- 
tions. By placing special emphasis on locally-flavored 
programs, such as a strong news operation, uhf television 
by the very nature of its smaller but more intensive cover- 
age can draw the greatest interest of the local community 
and so do a superior selling job. It is obvious that pro- 
grams of this type, available to national advertisers, merit 
the special attention of the buyer. 

At WTVP, we maintain close contact with brokers, job- 
bers, distributors, and field representatives of national ad- 
vertisers. We obtain from them information regarding 
product distribution and sales which becomes ammuni- 
tion for our own selling efforts, and we make certain they 
are made aware of every important "success story" as a 
result of an advertising schedule on WTVP. Recently, we 
secured a healthy order as a direct result of our contact 
with a field rep. When we learned that a large food chain 
was doing 44% of its total volume in Decatur and Spring- 
field alone — and probably 80% of its total in our coverage 
area — we were able to parlay this info into a sale for 
WTVP. We are ever on the alert for sales ammunition of 
this type; it points out why the station should be used. 

At the risk of oversimplification, let me sum up this way 
— when a buy is being contemplated in a market where 
there is a uhf property, I would suggest that the buyer, 
with the help of his research people, take a long, hard look 
at the uhf station. If that station has been operating for 
several years, the chances are excellent that all of the re- 
quirements are there and all the elements of success, in- 
cluding the ability to deliver a sizeable audience and to sell 
goods and services. Any uhf station which has come 
through the so-called "bleak days" of uhf. and is still alive 
and going strong and getting stronger deserves the close 
scrutiny of the buyer and researchers. There must be a 
reason for the station's success. That reason could spell 
sales for the advertiser. ^ 



SPONSOR 



24 april 1961 



71 




SPONSOR 



The 40-Second Furor 

The actions last week by the Association of National Ad- 
vertisers and the American Association of Advertising Agen- 
cies in officially protesting the 40-seeond station break struc- 
ture promulgated by ABC TV seem to have been inspired 
more by a desire to "go on record" that by any serious hope 
of (hanging the network position. 

ABC TV president Ollie Treyz had. by that time, made it 
abundantly clear to various agencies presidents that the net- 
work was firmly and finally committed to the 40-second 
principle. 

And the logic and realities of the situation are such that 
few in the industry can doubt that both CBS TV and NBC TV 
will sooner or later have to adopt to "two twenties" plan. 

Without attempting to pass judgment on the merits of the 
40-second structure (though frankly we believe that objections 
to it are much exaggerated) we do wonder why the ANA and 
AAAA feel it necessary to take a public stand on the matter. 

Are their memberships just trying to impress their own cli- 
ents and bosses? 

Medium of the future 

We liked the speech made recently by Robert F. Hyland, 
v.]). of CBS Radio and gen. mgr., KMOX, St. Louis, at the 
meeting of the Illinois Broadcasters Association. 

Calling radio "not the medium of the past but the medium 
of the future" Hyland asserted that radio is the "only me- 
dium capable of keeping pace with our growing mobile popu- 
lation." He offered it as his strong conviction that radio's 
listeners "need not be underestimated — they will not only 
accept but literally demand increasingly higher program 
levels"" 

Bob Hyland's insistence on broader horizons for the radio 
medium is typical, we find, of forward-looking radio men in 
main parts of the count! \ . 

His confidence that radio's potential in both programing 
and advertising i> tar from reached i- the -oil of confidence 
,ind faith that are building increased stature for radio every 
day and every week. 

SPONSOR i- proud to ally itself with such forward-look in- 
radio leaders. We know that their optimism is justified. ^ 









lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Comedians all: ABC TV sent out 
sales development wallets — contain- 
in," pictures and plugs for its day- 
time programing — to 500 advertising 
agency key personnel. The wallets | 
also held v.p. Ed Bleier's card. So I 
far, three have been returned to i 
Bleier with messages like, "Guess j 
you m 11. si have lost this." 

Imagery: In case you didn't get as 
far as the runover columns of last 
week's SPONSOR story, "Media: stil 
the agency stepchild?" — we thought 
you'd enjoy this quote from a vet- 
eran timebuyer: "We're obviously 
not glamorous; they don't produce 
plays and movies about media peo- 
ple. Imagine Tony Randall in the 
hack room, without a key to the ex- 
ecutive John.'' 

Trend: The anti-violence forces in 
tv won another round when the 
"Blood Money" episode of Acapulco 
was killed and replaced by one 

called "Death is a Smiling Man." 

Sound off: Up at WEBR, Buffalo, 
the "sing along" station, Bill 
Schweitzer has been engaged in some 
telegraphic repartee with two of his 
station's top (recorded) sing along 
talents. Les Paul and Mary Ford. 
Bill's last wire, sent to the couple's 
Mahwah, X. J., home, asked: "How 
do you pronounce the name of your 
town?" The reply was well within 
Western Union's minimum wordagci 
"With a trumpet, stupid!" 

Film cutter: That retailing firm (the 
one presenting Colt 44.95 and 76.89 

Sunset Strij) next season I has signed 
for participations on a local station 
show. The $500,000 Movie." 

Diagnosis: Comedian Sam Levenson 
has discovered that insanity is he- 
reditary. "You can get it." he 
claims, "from your kids. 

Program notes: Latest trend for the 
upcoming network tv season is the 
urbanization of Western and adven- 
ture shows. Many will change their 
scenery to the city, and tliey will have 
to change their names. Some 1901- 
02 entries: Gardner \Icka\ in Ad- 
ventures in Passaic; Robert Horton 
and John Mclntyre in Trolly Line: 
a show set in Los Angeles with .lames 
Arness called Gunsmog; and one 
called The Long Islanders. 



-I'dVSOR 



21 APRIL 1901 



WHY 

6 OUT OF 7* 

TAPE-EQUIPPED 

TV STATIONS 

BUY 

AMPEX 

TELEVISION 

RECORDERS 



1"lt opened up new territories for us in sales and production. Not 
only the obvious ones, such as increasing the number of spots, but 
«e find that it becomes much more advantageous for the small agency at 
the local level to buy (taped) spots on a plan basis because these spots 
can be repeated with little extra charge. I cannot single out the most 
important function of our Videotape* Television Recorders — all their 
functions are important. We have made better use of our personnel and 
facilities. And we have cut down the cost of spot announcement produc- 
tion. We have been able to sell the machine and its capabilities along with 

3ur own programming and production standards We certainly need the 

recorders and they, in turn, need us. Now tape places at our fingertips — 
and pocketbooks - another tool for creative broadcasting. . . . Why we 
sought Ampex? Ampex invented Videotape and it's proved itself to the 
entire industry. You can't ask for more than that."— Lawrence M. Carino, 
General Manager, WWL-TV, New Orleans, Louisiana. 



3 "It's a great selling tool. I don't see how anybody stays in business 
without it This market does more dollar volume of local busi- 
ness than a great many of the three-station markets in the country. 

ft great percentage of that business is on Videotape It gets local 

business because it absolutely takes the risk out of it. For example, it's 
awfully hard for an advertiser to visualize from a piece of copy paper with 
a video column and an audio column just what his commercial is going to 
look like on TV. But if the salesman can say, 'I've got a spot all recorded 
for you on your fall coat sale, and I want you to see it,' then he's sold. 
What do we think of Ampex? They're the leaders in tape. They put tape on 
the map, and as far as we're concerned, it's the Ampex VTR that's keep- 
ing it there."— John Tyler, General Manager, KFDA-TV, Amarillo, Texas. 



2 "We've used the Ampex VTR to make money and increase business 
. . . very definitely. We'll go on record as we have in the past. We 
know that the Ampex Television Recorder used properly, and sold aggres- 
sively, will pay for itself very easily It's increased our business by 

virtue of the volume that we couldn't have obtained without the machine. 
It's so successful that we frequently go out to the used car lots, for ex- 
ample, or the furniture stores, or even the banks, and do their commer- 
cials on location on tape. There are so many ways we've used the Ampex 
Television Recorder to make money, that it's hard to pick out the ones 
to talk about. ... We wouldn't have the VTR's if they didn't make money. 
We think so highly of ours we're about to spend another 50 thousand dol- 
lars on Ampex equipment. I guess that lets you know how we feel about 
Ampex. Videotape is their baby all the way. Always has been." — George 
W. Harvey, Vice President and General Manager, WFLA-TV, Tampa-St. 
Petersburg, Florida. 



4 "More than $3,000 a week in billing- both announcement and pro- 
gram — dependent on one Ampex tape machine. That's a typical 
week here at Channel 5. We've been in business with Videotape for slight- 
ly over two years and our one machine shows 3,272 hours of use and 

service Ninety percent of our political business last fall was on tape. 

I don't say we wouldn't have gotten it on a live basis, but it was easier, 
less costly, and much more convenient to candidates, having the busy 

grass roots schedules they do Sure, we see every reason for getting 

a second machine — and we shall eventually, but we've done a phenome- 
nal job with one for two years. There's no question about our choice of 
Ampex. They are TV tape recording, no doubt about it." — Fred Fletcher, 
Executive Vice President, WRAL-TV, Raleigh, North Carolina. 



5 "We've increased our income with the Ampex Television Recorder 
by not having to spend so much time and money in getting and keep- 
ing business. What we produce on our VTR is keeping clients sold. We're 
putting our efforts where they'll do us the most good and our billing is 
increasing all the time. An end effect has been that our production, be- 
cause of the Ampex Television Recorder, now puts us — a secondary mar- 
ket station — on a par with the quality of metropolitan market stations. 
. . . Frankly, I can't see how some of these secondary market stations can 
afford to operate without a Television Recorder. We're sold on TV tape 
recording — sold on our Ampex equipment, too. Ampex has been the lead- 
er for five years now."- Bill Hoover, President, KTEN-TV, Ada, Oklahoma. 



6 "We do more jobs . . . better with Videotape Recording. Business is 
better than it's ever been and we have a smoother, more efficient 
operation. For us, Ampex VTR is a basic piece of equipment that fit into 
our operation right from the start. It's no 'sacred cow' to us; everyone 
here operates it. And essentially, it gives us a whole crew of operators 
plus announcers ... a real problem-solver when it comes to scheduling 
personnel. From an operating standpoint, it's tremendous. Today, for in- 
stance, the boys are knocking out 15 1-minute commercials. And we have 
scheduled as many as 63 recordings in one operating day. I wouldn't want 
to go back to operating without an Ampex." — Al Beck, Chief Engineer, 
KGBT-TV, Harlingen, Texas. 



VISIT AMPEX NAB EXHIBIT NO. 28 

' TM AMPEX CORP. 



7.46 AS OF JANUARY 



Pioneer And Leader In Magnetic Tape Technology 

AMPEX VIDEO PRODUCTS COMPANY 

934 Charter St., Redwood City, Calif. • Ampex of Canada, Ltd., Rexdale, Ontario 

VIDEOTAPE TELEVISION RECORDERS: VR-1000C Deluxe Console, VR-1001A Upright Model • MAJOR VTR ACCESSORIES: Inter-Synct, Amtect, Color Facility 

TELEVISION CAMERAS: Ampex -Marconi Mark IV 




£4 




1 



i 



l 







Mt- 









MR. HTROLD 



MR. EC 



"Use of RCA TV TAPE 

helps to bolster client's sales' 

. . . says Joe Herold, Station Manager, KBTV, Den 1 



"A good example of successful selling via TV Tape is the 
experience of one of our clients Bill Kger of Eger Rambler 
Center. Denver. Xumber One Rambler Dealer in the area 
and Number One Willys Jeep Dealer in the area, he uses 
television in spots. Near perfect results in presenting the 
message on RCA TV Tape has had a great deal to do with 
our client's sales success." adds Mr. Herold. 

Hill Eger reports: "We use KBTY television for our cat- 
advertising and RCA TV Tape facilities for recording our 
spots. The results can't be distinguished from live produc- 
tion. We attribute much of our leadership in selling cars to 
i he perfect results we gel with RCA TV Tape." 

"We usually show several autos in each commercial, and 



this was a burden and expense before TV Tape sine; 
were forced to pick up and deliver cars to the studio 
hours. Now we set up a convenient time and prodi 
great number of commercials in one recording 
We also get the important advantage of previewing 
approval before the announcements are exposed to the pi 

Your clients, too, will like the "live" picture qui 
RCA TV Tape thanks to many built-in quality- 
features and the convenience of centralized control, 
you come to RCA for your TV Tape equipment! 
get the most advanced features, and service befor^ 
after the sale that only RCA with its broad backg 
in broadcasting can provide. 



TV 



write 
N.J. 




Mi >sl I ision 

R VDII I 



I MAY 1961 
4©< a copy* $8 a yaar 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



e've taken over the m m 

Ballroom at the NAB! 




e NAB this year we are setting up one of the 
unusual displays RCA has ever assembled. 
>ecause we have so much to show you and want 
o see it all in the greatest comfort, we have 
over the entire Main Ballroom of the Shoreham 
. Here you can inspect our line-up of new 
least and Television equipment and see first 
our latest business-slanted developments. We're 
g you'll have a ball— and what better place 
the Ballroom to have it! 

SHOREHAM HOTEL 

Street and Connecticut Ave., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 




Scale Model 

of 1961 RCA 

Ballroom Exhibit 



The Most Trusted Name 
in Electronics 

RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



See you in the Ballroom ! 

Take this diagram with you when you visit 
the RCA Exhibit. It will help you to make 
the best use of your time while at NAB. 








ARE REGIONAL 
MAGS A MATCH 
FOR SPOT TV? 

Boom in the regional 
editions of magazines 
is reaction to hefty 
spot tv billings rise 

Page 31 



60% of web tv 
nighttime shows 
SRO next season 

Page 34 



Roman bounces 
back with spot 
tv and radio 



Page 36 



5 basic tactics 
for advertisers 
using spot radio 



Page 39 




1 IVEFFIGIES 

h e e lin q 



A SERIES OF FRAMEABLE ADworld CLOSE-UPS! 







#4 WTReffigy TV SERIES FROM WHEELING, WEST VIRGINIA • Scan Zoo Ammals. Inc . Los Angeles, Calilorn.a 



Important . . . WTRF-TV Wheeling Market . . . Dominant in Rich 
Booming Wheeling-Steubenville Industrial Ohio Valley . . . 2l'> Million 
People spending P t Billion Dollars Annually . . . 7500 Retail Outlets 
Tops in Sales . . . Service . . . Results! Better Buy . . . 
WTRF-TV Wheeling! 



wtrf til 



316,000 walls lj \l D network color 




Represented Nationally by George P. Hollingbery Company 



WHEELING 7, WEST VIRGIN!/ 



'MARCH 



are 



they 



bigger 




the harder they fall for WCAU-TV! 



The latest ARB* shows that Channel 10 delivers more adults than any other 
Philadelphia station. And more women ! If you've got big sales ideas, reach 
the big spenders . Call CBS Television Spot Sales or CBS Owned WCAU-TV. 



SPONSOR • 1 MAY 1%] 



£ Vol. 15, .Vo. 18 • 1 MAY 1961 



Whatever 

p-. l i'i'ri'['i' |, rri , |T!'ri'r| 

WDBO -TV 

CH.6* CBS- ORLANDO 

/5 DOMINANT 

1st in 
CENTRAL 
FLORIDA 

NIELSENDEC.1960 

Metro Share 



STA. 


MON.-FRI. 


SUN.- SAT. 


12-3PM 


3-6PM 


6-9PM 


9-Mid. 


WDBO 
'B' 


% 

59 

27 

13 


% 

51 

23 
24 


% 

49 

27 
22 


% 

47 

26 

24 



Homes Reached 



STA. 


MON.-FRI. 


SUN. -SAT. 


12-3PM 


3-6PM 


6-9PM 


9-Mid. 


WDBO 
'B' 

•c 


(00) 

277 

128 
53 


(00) 

279 
128 
108 


(00) 

515 

316 
237 


(00) 

387 
215 

203 



ARB • NOV. 1960 

(9AM MIDNIGHT, SUN. thru SAT.) 

Metro Share 



WDBO-TV DELIVERS 

• 36.4% more than Sta.'B' 
•97.3% more than Sta.'C 



Homes Reached 



WDBO-TV DELIVERS 

•29.7% more than Sta.'B' 
•64.4% more than Sta.'C 



BLAIR TVA has more FACTS! 






SPONSOR 

THK WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



ARTICLES 

Regionals a match for tv spot? 

31 Iii(lu-ti> points up high costs, low penetration and flexibility in exam- 
ining magazines' challenge ti> Bpot t\ via circulation segmentation 

Plenty of SRO shows in '61 tv season 

34 Out of 106 network nighttime programs set for 1961-62, there are 65 
currently sold out. Only 14 shows are without any sponsors at all 

Roman numbers one thanks to spot tv 
36 Roman Products, producers of Frozen Italian food, is number one in all 

its markets, after a year in spot tv. Humorous commercials are used 

5 major spot radio tactics 

39 Although most spot radio advertisers today use varied combinations 
of the many media strategies, sponsor selects five as the most basic 

Theatre party fetes $350 million 

40 Clients representing $350 million in tv-radio billings, are among the 
guests at TV Guide's 8th anniversary theatre party-supper celebration 

The spot tv story for 1960 

42 The medium was up 7.9% over 1959, TvB reports, with expenditures by 
food and grocery advertisers taking a big lead. P&G again top client 

NEWS: Newsmaker of the Week 6, Sponsor-Scope 19. Sponsor-Week 25, 
Washington Week 55, Film-Scope 56, Sponsor Hears 58, Sponsor-Week Wrap- 
Up 60, Tv and Radio Newsmakers 67 

DEPARTMENTS: Sponsor Backstage 10, Timebuyers at Work 
12, 49th and Madison 14, Radio Results 44, Sponsor Asks 46, Spot Buys 48, 
Seller's Viewpoint 68, Sponsor Speaks 70, Ten-Second Spots 70 

..... ~ 

Officers: editor and publisher, Norman R. Glenn; executive vice presi- 
dent, Bernard Piatt; vice president and assistant publisher, Arnold Alpert; 
secretary-treasurer, Elaine Couper Glenn. 

Editorial: executive editor, John E. McMillin; news editor, Ben Bodec; 
managing editor, Alfred J. Jafje; senior editor, Jane Pinkerton; midwest edi- 
tor, Given Smart; film editor, Hey ward Ehrlich; associate editors, Jack Lind- 
rup, Ben Seffi Michael G. Silver, Ruth Schlanger, Diane Schwartz; columnist, 
Joe Csida; art editor, Maury Kurtz; production editor, Frances Giustra; 
editorial research, Elaine Johnson. 

Advertising: eastern manager, Willard Dougherty; southern manager, 
Herbert M. Martin, Jr.; midwest manager, Paul Blair; western manager, 
George G. Dietrich, Jr.; sales service/production, Jo Ganci, Shirley S. Allison, 
Barbara Parkinson. 

Circulation: manager, Seymour Weber; reader service, Lynn Cane; Kath- 
ryn O'Connell. 

Administrative: assistant to publisher, S. T. Massimino; office mana- 
ger, Fred Levine; George Becker, Michael Crocco, Syd Gottman, Wilke Rich, 
Irene Sulzbach, Geraldine Daych. 



© 1961 SPONSOR Publications Inc. 



Member of Business Publications |_|_f. | 

Audit of Circulations Inc. !"!»■ 1 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, Circulation, and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St., New York 17, MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 
N. Michigan Av. (11), SUperior 7-9863. Birmingham Office: 3617 8th Ave. So., FAairfax 
2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Blvd. (28). Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 
3110 Elm Av., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada $9 a year. Other 
countries $11 a year. Single copies 40<. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd class 
postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



SI'dNMlli 



• 1 MAY 1961 



"Where there is no publicity, 
there is no justice. 
Publicity is the very soul 
of justice" 



* 

-JEREMY BENTHAM 



c As quoted by the court in Jerusalem after its observation of the Capital Cities equipment in operation. 



Capital Cities Broadcasting Corporation salutes 

The American Broadcasting Company □ The Columbia Broadcasting System □ The National Broad- 
casting Company □ NTA Television Broadcasting Corporation □ United Press International □ Hearst 
Metrotone News □ Independent Television Corporation □ Associated Television Limited □ A.B.C. 
Television Limited □ Associated Rediffusion Limited □ Granada TV Network □ Independent Television 
News Limited □ British Commonwealth International Newsfilm Agency □ Nord-und Westdeutschen 
Rundfunkverbandes □ Praesens-Film, A.G., 

who have joined with us to make possible the videotape 
record exactly as it oceurs-in the courtroom in 

Jerusalem-of the historic trial of Adolf Eiehmane. 




for CAPITAL CITIES BROADCASTING CORPORATION 

Milton A. Fruchtman producer 
Leo Hurwitz director 



SPONSOR • 1 MAY 1961 




oeni/ CuJv 




KRIZ reaches 

more homes in the Phoenix 

metropolitan area 
in the course of a week than 
any other station.* 

Based on seven days 

a week, 24 hours a day, 
KRIZ readies 13.7% 

oi the total radio homes in 
the nation's fastest — 
growing cii\. 

'Cumulative Pulse Audience Phoenix, \pi/<>m.i 
(Metropolitan area), November, I960 

KRIZ 




call robert e. eastman & co., inc. 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Etlivin Cox, chair man of the executive committee of Kenyon 
& Eckhartlt, succeeds Harry Harding, executive vice presi~ 
dent of Young & Rubicam, as chairman of the hoard of the 
American Association of Advertising Agencies. Cox, a 40-year 
adman, was vice chairman of the 4A , s during the past year. 

The newsmaker: The new chairman of the board of the 

American Association of Advertising Agencies is Edwin Cox, 

chairman of the executive committee of Kenyon & Eckhardt. 

Cox, who has been vice-chairman of the 4A's for the past year, 

succeeds Harry Harding, executive v.p. of Young & Rubicam, as 

association head. 

Last fall Cox celebrated his fortieth year in advertising. It was 

in the fall of 1920 that he first joined A. W. Shaw Compan\ in 

Chicago as a copywriter. 

Up to 1933. when he joined 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, he was assist- 
ant director of advertising at A. 

W. Shaw, and advertising mana- 
ger of Celotex Company. He was 

at Lennen & Mitchell in New York 

from 1928 to 1931 and then at 

Young & Rubicam. 

In 1934, the year after he 

joined Kenyon & Eckhardt, Cox 

was elected vice president. He 

was elected senior v. p. in 1946, 

vice chairman of the board in 
1956, and chairman of the board 

of directors in 1957. He became chairman of K&E's executive com- 
mittee last year. 

Cox has been an important figure in 4-A's activities for a long 
time. He was vice chairman of the board in 1960-61, a director-at- 
large from 1957 to 1959. a member of the operations committee in 
1959-60, and a member of the committee on improvement of adver- 
tising contents — of which he was chairman for 1957-59. 

Cox, a director of the National Outdoor Advertising Bureau, also 
holds posts outside the advertising field. He is a member of the 
Board of Visitors of the Graduate School of Public Relations of 
Boston I Diversity and is a trustee of the American Foundation for 
Allergic Diseases. 

Born in Austin. Texas, Cox attended public schools in Texas, 
Oklahoma, and Alabama, and was graduated in 1917 from the Dallas 
High School. He joined the army immediately afterwards, and, re- 
turning from France in 1919, spent a year at the University of 
Illinois before entering the advertising field. 




Edwin Cox 



SPONSOR 



1 MAY 1961 



The San Francisco picture: 



KRON -TV 



had more viewers 



than any other television station 
in Northern California 

every month 
for the last three years 



1958 



1959 



1960 



San Francisco Chronicle 

NBC— Channel 4 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward 



Source: ARB Reports 

Total Homes Reached Per 

Average Quarter Hour 



SPONSOR • 1 MAY 1961 







Moral: A dollar invested in day-time TV reaches more teomei 
more often than lite same dollar spent at wight ! Time was when the J 

vcrtiser interested in talking to women stood by this hard and fast rule: Daytime for frequency; Nigjt- 
time for reach. Things have changed. A recent research study shows Daytime leading Nighttime* 
reach at every level of frequency. NBC had Nielsen compare a typical night-time buy — an altern# 
half-hour — and an NBC day-time schedule of approximately the same cost. Result? Over a foir- 

NBC Daytime Line-up: 10:00 Say When • 10:30 PIj> Your I lunch (color) • 11:00 Price Is Right (color) • 11:30 Concentration • 12:00 TniA or Consequences • 12:30 It Could Be)» 




eek period, the evening show reached 18,100,000 different homes. The NBC day-time schedule 
ached 22,100,000 different homes; 4,000,000 more homes for Daytime! What's more, the average 
ly-time home received almost twice the number of commercial messages, yielding 477 more homes 
* dollar. Whether it's a matter of four weeks or eight weeks, homes reached once or a 
)zen times . . . day-time dollars reach more homes.* So, if you've got women on your mind, 
•nsider the advantages otNKC Television Network— first in the Daytime! 




l & Com Data. Match-April 1960. Estimated Time and Published Talent Costs. 



or) • 2:00 Jan Murray Show (color) • 2:30 Loretta Young Theatre • 3:00 Young Dr. Malonc • 3:30 From These Roots • 4:00 Make Room For Daddy • 4:30 Here's Hollywood 






Review, please, 
the latest survey 
of your choice: 

Nielsen (Louisville Metro 
Area, Nov.-Dec, 1960) 

Hooper (Oct.-Dec, 1960) 

Pulse (Louisville Metro 
Area, Nov., 1960) 

Trendex (Louisviiie,Au g . 

24-28, 1959) 

Verifak (Louisville, Oct., 
1960) 

Conlan ( Louisville, Nov., 
1960) 

Unbelievable 
undu p licated audience 
in the 

Louisville Metro Area 
belongs to WKLO* 
Need we say more? 

•Nielsen, November-December, 1960 



see 




robert e. 

eastman & co., inc. 

Other Air Trails Stations: 

WING, Dayton, O. 
WCOL, Columbus, O. 
WIZE, Springfield, O. 
WEZE, Boston, Mass. 



10 




by Joe Csida 



Sponsor 

": I : * _o 







Those behind-the-scene heroes 

For lo these many fast-moving and fascinating 
years I've looked forward each Spring to the an- 
nual convention of the National Association of 
Broadcasters. And I blush not at all to say that 
I anticipate the one coming up 7 May with the 
same starry-eyed (well, almost) enthusiasm as I 
did my first one, two decades and more ago. To 
begin with, since 1945 the convention represents 
the one opportunity I have each year to spend a little time with the 
most vital, interesting single gang of guys it has ever been my good 
fortune to encounter. I speak, of course, of the VIPs, who didn't 
really win World War II, to be sure, but made their own vastly 
pleasurable and insignificant contribution to it. Judge Justin Miller, 
Colonel Harry Wilder, Clair McCollough, Leonard Reinsch, Bill 
Hedges, Martin Campbell, Joe Ream, Bob Swezey, John Fetzer, Mark 
Woods, Morrie Novik, Sol Taishoff, Abel Green, escorting officer Ed 
Kirby, and adopted war waifs Teddy Bergman, Don Kearny and 
Lester Lindow constitute as interestingly diversified a group of 
gentlemen as exist anywhere in the world. Jack Alicoate is the only 
member of the original group who has left us, and we miss him. and 
will drink a toast to his dapper and charming memory come 7 May. 

The rest come up each year with fresh stories, new achievements ! 
and the capacity to create an air of camaraderie unmatched by any 
other group I've ever met. Our leader, Judge Miller, as a matter of 
fact, is getting the NAB Distinguished Service Award this year, fol-l 
lowing the example set him by Clair McCollough who was thus 
honored in Chicago last year. 

Introducing EMI 

At this Convention, too, I will have a direct association with an 
important exhibitor. My company, Capitol Records, Inc., has just 
organized (as you may have heard I a wholly owned subsidiary 
called EMI/US. The function of this company is to manufacture 
and/or distribute broadcasting and electronic equipment of various 
types. The products it will be distributing are, for the most part, 
manufactured by Electrical and Musical Industries, Ltd. (whence the 
KM I l. an English organization of tremendous scope with a record 
for having introduced some of the finest broadcasting and electronic 
equipment in use around the world today. Among other items EMI 
IS will feature at the NAB are an excellent videotape and a small, 
highly effective image orthicon camera. Also featured will be a line 
of tubes of a most sophisticated nature, such as the traveling wave 
tubes used in space shots. This naturally gives me an area of interest, 
in the convention, which I've never previously had. 

A third element of special interest to me is that on opening day 



SPONSOR 



1 MAY 1961 



my favorite television performer, President John F. Kennedy, will 
address the convention. I have continued to watch the President's 
television activities with unabated interest. A number of very able 
critics, notably Jack Gould of the New York Times, have indicated 
that they considered the President might be over-exposing himself 
on television and thus decreasing and minimizing his effectiveness, 
and his ability to get his ideas across to the public. 1 have seen no 
direct comment on this point from the President himself, but Pierre 
Salinger, his press secretary, told the Westinghouse Broadcasting 
Corporation's fourth annual public service clinic in Pittsburgh last 
week that he thought there was no danger of overexposure at all. 
It is Salinger's opinion that the people are vitally interested in 
everything the President says, particularly in this critical period, and 
that the same rules of overexposure, which hold for most performers, 
do not hold for the President. 

Media fight to blame? 

Personally, I'm not too sure Mr. Salinger is correct. My own long 
observations of the people's viewing habits stir the notion in me that 
substantial segments of the public may "tire" of seeing too much of 
the President and/or develop such a feeling of familiarity with 
him, that his relationship with and effect upon them, is damaged. 
At any rate Mr. Salinger, presumably with the President's whole- 
hearted approval, is making whatever efforts he can to prevent a 
decrease in the President's exposure. He told the WBC audience 
that after the seventh or eight Kennedy press conferences, the White 
House began to get letters from various sections of the country say- 
ing that the local stations were no longer carrying the telecasts and/ 
or broadcasts of the President's press conferences. 

Networks and stations should weigh very carefully the question 
of whether they should carry the conferences, and carry them in 
full, said Mr. Salinger. Among other effects of the refusal of the 
nets and stations to carry the conferences, he indicated that com- 
petitive media, particularly newspapers and magazines, would claim 
that the failure of broadcasters to carry the shows plainly indicated 
their unworthiness to carry them at all. Mr. S. may have something 
there, but completely apart from the reaction of competitive media, 
I hope the networks and their affiliated stations will continue to 
carry the press conferences in full. As I've indicated in previous 
columns, they are my own personal favorite programs, and I believe 
that substantial segments of the population find them equally fasci- 
nating and helpful. 

I'd like to go a step further, as a matter of fact, and urge the nets 
and stations to advertise and promote the shows. At the moment, 
for example, spot announcements, newspaper ads, etc. urging the 
viewer/listener to be sure to tune in the Presidential press confer- 
ence to hear what Mr. Kennedy had to say on the Cuban invasion, 
the unanswered questions about Yuri Gagarin's flight into space, the 
Laos situation, etc. would certainly be effective. In short, I believe 
the Press Conferences are first-rate. 

The President has also come in for a good deal of criticism with- 
in Congress and outside because of the fact that some of the Presi- 
dential shows have been sponsored by such advertisers as Crest 
Toothpaste, Purex, Bell & Howell, etc. This is far too complex a 
subject to cover in the last few lines of a column, but it's certainly 
smart advertising for the sponsors involved, in my opinion. 

See you at the NAB. ^ 



GOOD 




6 out of 10 copies 
of SPONSOR go to 
BUYERS OF TIME! 



SPONSOR 



1 MAY 1961 



11 



YOU 

ARE 

CORDIALLY 

INVITED 

TO 

VISIT 

SPONSOR'S 

INTERNATIONAL 

SUITE 

AT 

THE 

NAB 

CONVENTION 

G-803 

THE SHOREHAM 

Surprises 
galore! 



Timebuyers 
at work 




Shirley Weiner of Richard K. Ylanoff, Inc.. \ ,-u York. wishes that 
station men would contact a bu\er to tell their station's storj "ten 
weeks before a bu\ing campaign starts rather than the week before it 
starts. Station men are a source of enlightening information about 
their markets and competitors and will be welcome at am time of the 
year except in the midst of a buy- 
ing campaign. Last spring we were 
buying 60 radio markets and 70 tv 
markets within a four-week period. 
During this heavy work-load peri- 
od we had no time to see anyone. 
Station men visiting New York 
told their reps that they wanted to 
see us. It was impossible, even 
though we wanted to see them. 
The time to make contact is when 
the buyer has time to digest their 
facts and figures and query them 
about their station. The man in the middle is the station representa- 
tive. On one hand he is pressured by the station to get the appoint- 
ment — and he is cognizant of how busy the buyer is. The only solu- 
tion is to see the buyer and tell your story during a slack period." 

Yolanda Tini, S. E. Zubrow, Philadelphia, discusses "audience qual- 
ity": "Recently I got into a discussion with a rep about the quality 
of spot. What is 'quality'? The dictionary defines it as 'a distinguish- 
ing property or characteristic, that which makes or helps to make 
something what it is.' Taking the true meaning of the word, a high 

brow audience is not limited to 
classical programing. A quality 
audience for one product will be 
based on entirely different criteria 
from that which means quality to 
another. For many products and 
under many circumstances, a qual- 
ity audience can be the audience 
of a pure rock and roll format. I 
cannot recall seeing literature or 
material cross my desk on 'audi- 
ence quality.' Too often, the ma- 
terial we do see has to do with 
numbers, and we get lost talking about quantity rather than quality. 
Perhaps this comes under the heading of judgment rather than sur- 
vey material — there must be audience differences; however, it is my 
feeling that audience quality material is lacking in the industry. By 
quality we do not mean the vital statistics of audience composition." 




12 



SPONSOR 



1 MAY 1961 



INSTITU 






. . . characterized by 

progress 







^6*6^^ <^pw 



FOUNDER 






KWT\/ 



MASSAC H U SETTS 
INSTITUTE 
OF TECHNOLOGY OKL.AI IOIVIA CI Y 



KWTlf' OKLAHOMA CITY Represented nationally by Edward Retry & Company, Inc 




49th and 

Madison 



Lots of luck 

With your kind arrangement the in- 
itial issue of Brain magazine will 
finally come out on 5 June 1961. It 
took an unexpectedly long time for 
the preparation hut we have decided 
to start with a circulation of 20,000 
at the onset, which is a fairly large 
circulation for this t\pe of magazine 
in this country . 

Tins outline explains the format 
and look of the magazine. It contains 
124 pages, of which 101 pages are 
for letterpress, 12 pages for gravure 
and 2 pages for four-color reproduc- 
tions. On the front cover and inside 
hack-cover of the enclosed promotion- 
al specimen, we have given credit 
lines to all cooperating publications. 
Of course we shall give a full credit 



line to each reprinted article too. 

We shall keep mailing a copy of 
Brain every month and a marked 
copy via air mail to you. We should 
like to take this opportunity to thank 
you for your assistance and request 
your further cooperation. 

N. Sakamoto 
executive editor 
Brain Magazine 
Tokyo, Japan 

# Each issue of BRAIN i> printed entirely in Jap- 
anese, contents are excerpted articles from ten United 
states advertising and business publications. In addi- 
tion to SPONSOR, these are: ADVERTISING ACE, 
ADVERTISER'S WEEKLY, ART DIRECTION. 
BUSINESS WEEK. BROADCASTING, EORT1 \ I 
MOIiEltN PACKAGING, PRINTERS' INK, THE 
REPORTER (IE DIRECT MAIL ADVERTISING. 

In Tokyo January 1960, an organ- 
ization called "Allied CM (commer- 
cial message) council" (ACC) was 
established consisting of three as- 
sociations representing respectively 




WAVE -TV viewers use 
28.8% more GAS and OIL 

—because they drive 28.8% more miles, 
in 28.8% more cars, trucks and tractors! 




That's because WAVE-TV has 28.8 % more 
viewers, from sign-on to sign-off, in any 
average week. Source: N.S.I., Dec, 1960. 

CHANNEL 3 • MAXIMUM POWER 
NBC 

LOUISVILLE 

NBC SPOT SALES, National Representatives 



that of advertiser, broadcasting sta- 
tion and agency. It aims principally 
to improve and level up the broad- 
casting advertising condition in Ja- 
pan having three committees, plan- 
ning, survey and technique. 

Now we are contemplating to hold 
"Advertising Film Festival" this fall 
for the first time in this country mak- 
ing after model of your same project 
and now we are endeavouring to pre- 
pare to realize the plans successfully. 
Mr. Takeji Imaizumi, one of the 
managing staff and chairman of mar- 
keting plans board of Hakuhodo In- 
corporated Advertising, second big- 
gest advertising agency in Japan 
(who has just founded joint com- 
pany with McCann Erickson in 
Tokyo and shocked advertising 
world) and at the same time assum- 
ing the post of chairman of survey 
committee of ACC, is now making an 
inspection tour around the world, on 
advertising to study the activities of 
broadcasting advertising, especially 
that CM Festival. 

Norio Saigo 

executive secretary 

Japan Advertisers Association 

Tokyo, Japan 

• Japanese interest in United States tv and radio 
developments hat Increased substantially during the 
past 5'ear. 




TnlS IS ART McCOY 




THIS IS JAY WHALEN 

One of those inexplicable boo- 
boos resulted in pairing the 
name of Arthur H. McCoy, exec, 
v.p. at John Blair with Jay 
Whalen's picture on page 6 of 
the 24 April 1961 issue of 
SPONSOR, for which we apolo- 
gize. Whalen sells for Blair. 



14 



SPONSOR 



• 1 MAY 1961 





^rp 



( 






WTVJ is the first television station ever 
to win all three awards in one year! 



WTVJ and its News Department are 
honored to receive these highly respected 
awards. And according to the ratings, rec- 
ognition is not restricted to the industry ; 
the people of South Florida also appre- 
ciate WTVJ's news reporting efforts. 
Sign-on to sign-off, Monday through Fri- 
day, the area's highest-rated* program — 
network or local — is "Renick Reporting", 
the 6:30 p.m. newscast. In news reporting 
as well as audience measurement, "only 
the sunshine covers South Florida better 

than WTVJ ! " *ARB Jan.- Feb.. 1961 



1. SIGMA DELTA CHI AWARD "for distinguished service in 
journalism — television reporting" 

2. NATIONAL PRESS PHOTOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION, 
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, 
and THE ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA AWARD 

as "Newsfilm station of the year" 

3. NATIONAL HEADLINERS CLUB AWARD "for consistently 
outstanding coverage of local news events" 



WTVJ 



South Florida's Largest Daily Circulation Medium 
A Wometco Enterprises, Inc. Station 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD. INC. 





rvj 

(LOS -TV | 

WFGA-TV 
(Affiliate) 



0UTSTA1N 

TE LEVIS 




CBS REPORTS 



G-E COLLEGE BOWL 



)ING 





•NIXON DEBATES 



For more than twenty years the annual George 
Foster Peabody Awards have paid tribute to the 
conscience and ability of the nation's broad- 
casters in discharging their public responsibil- 
ity.This year's Peabody jury has just singled out 
the CBS Television Network for five awards in 
network television. It thus confirms the judg- 
ment of millions of Americans that we are pro- 
viding not only the programs they enjoy most, 
but those that are most essential to a greater un- 
derstanding of the events and issues of our time. 

CBS TELEVISION NETWORK 



"OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING: CBS I960 

Olympic Coverage . . .was the outstanding presentation in all 35 years of broad- 
cast time. Technical problems were surmounted with stunning ingenuity. For 
the Winter Games at Squaw Valley, equipment was brought in by toboggan 
and cameras were carried up icy slopes on the backs of cameramen. For the 
Summer Games at Rome, the events were brought to the American public 
(often on the same day they took place) through tape, split-second transatlantic 
jet schedules ... As a result, the American audience participated Winter and 
Summer in a great international undertaking. Such a television achievement 
is clearly an outstanding contribution to international understanding . . ." 

"OUTSTANDING TELEVISION ENTERTAINMENT: The Fabulous Fifties combined Style, 

humor and imagination. It was rich in touches of quality showmanship and 
equally rich in the memories of a decade which it revived. In recognition, the 
Television Award for Entertainment is presented to The Fabulous Fifties with 
a special word of praise for producer Leland Hayward, and the top talent 
which appeared in this memorable entertainment special." 

"OUTSTANDING TELEVISION PUBLIC SERVICE: CBS Reports. This Award cites, in 

particular, the "Harvest of Shame"; commends David Lowe as producer of 
this unflinching account of how the migrant worker lives in America, and 
Fred Friendly, executive producer; and carries a special Citation to William 
S. Paley, Chairman of the Board of the Columbia Broadcasting System, for 
his valor and vision in espousing the cause of public enlightenment by under- 
writing these documentary studies of the world of reality and airing them in 
the face of formidable opposition from the competing world of unreality." 

"OUTSTANDING TELEVISION YOUTH PROGRAM: G-E College Bowl. Through contests 

between two teams of students, G-E College Bowl helps to focus the nation's 
attention on the intellectual abilities and achievements of college students. 
The competition emphasized quick recall of specific facts and therein lies its 
appeal which is illuminating, educational, entertaining and exciting. The pro- 
gram provides weekly scholarship grants to colleges and universities. Allen 
Ludden as moderator deserves special mention for his excellent work . . ." 

"SPECIAL AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PUBLIC SERVICE: Dr. Frank Stanton, CBS. 'The 

Great Debates' between the Presidential candidates are recognized as con- 
ceivably the most important service ever performed by Broadcasting and one 
that may become a permanent part of our political heritage. The Award goes to 
Dr. Frank Stanton for his initiative . . . and his courageous leadership in bring- 
ing about the Joint Resolution of Congress which made the debates possible." 



7 A CTic e 

•Hi,.... ^*^ 



,0 " coo. 



i 







\ 

m>3L 



We don't believe in hiding honors under a bushel. Particularly this one. wpix is the only New 
York independent TV station qualified to display the National Association of Broad 
casters' Seal of Good Practice. It's far from being an empty honor — it has -real and 
valuable meaning for you, our advertisers. It is an assurance of specific higher standards 
of programming and commercial practices, wpix is the only independent with the Seal 

Where are your 60-second commercials tonight? 

NEW YORK'S PRESTIGE INDEPENDENT 




Interpretation and commentary 
on most significant tv /radio 
and marketing news of the week 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



I MAY 1961 

Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Another era in network tv seems to have come to an eclipse : the late afternoon 
stripping of kid shows. 

The last of the Mohicans in this area, General Mills, has abandoned the idea of an- 
other 'cross-the-board network home for its Rocky and Friends cartoon. D-F-S, the 
agency for GM's assorted cereals, is trying to sell a proposition to stations. 

The proposition: General Mills will buy two minute participations in Rocky for at least 
26 weeks if a station agrees to schedule the show as a quarter-hour strip. 

Stations already approached by D-F-S are reported looking askance at GM's proposal 
on two grounds: (1) the partial sponsorship and (2) how are they going to fill the other 
quarter-hour, because a kid strip usually runs for a half-hour at least. 

As for the end of the network kid strip, it's a case of the time becoming too expensive 
for the limited audience. There's also this factor: affiliates prefer to schedule their own 
kid strips. It nets them more revenue. 



The Tea Council (Burnett) has decided to get back into radio this summer. 

Availabilities have been asked for in 30 markets, with June starting dates. 

There's some talk also about the Council running a summer tv schedule. 

Another sizeable campaign out of the midwest for radio. Standard Oil of Indiana 
(D'Arcy), in about 100 markets in 13 states starting 23 May. 

A newcomer to radio: Derusto (Stern, Walters & Simmons), a six-week campaign in 
peak driving hours around weather, news and sports. 



National spot tv buying went along at a pretty brisk pace last week with Chi- 
cago agencies accounting for the bulk of it. 

Included among the Chicago activity: Pabst Beer (K&E), I.D.'s for eight weeks; 
Kool Pops (FC&B), 13 weeks spring and summer; P&G's Lava soap and Secret deodorant 
(Burnett) ; Alberto-Culver (Compton) ; P&G's Camay (Burnett) ; Sta-Nu Magic (Wade). 

Sta-Nu, a material used in the dry cleaning process to replace fabric oils, bills about 
$1 million. It just moved from Reach-McClinton. 

Some of the spot tv buys out of New York: Lipton Instant (SSCB) ; Joe Lowe's 
Popsicles (Gardner); Van Heusen shirts (Grey), four weeks; Pepto-Bismol (B&B) ; Hanes 
knitwear (Ayer), four weeks. 



A SPONSOR-SCOPE spot check among leading tv reps last week disclosed that 
while May business was somewhat off as compared to a year ago the outlook for 
June and the forepart of July was pretty good. 

Among the observations gathered : 

• The strongest pickup of spot tv seems to be out of the middle west, while the west coast 
seems to be under competitive pressure of split-run magazines. (See lead story in this 
issue.) 

• The summer valley is still the No. One problem of the medium. The only way to 
counter it is to keep thrusting at advertisers facts and figures showing that plenty of buying 
by consumers takes place in the summer and that viewing in July and August still averages 
over four hours per home. 

• Where stations will likely get a substantial revenue boost this summer will be from re- 
tailers. 



1 MAY 1961 



19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



You may not have been especially aware of it, but a phenomenon of network 
tv that has made almost as fast headway as the nighttime minute participation is 
the *plit. or piggyback, commercial. 

\t the moment there's not a nighttime package goods advertiser in the network 
ranks that hasn't, during the current season, split a minute hetween a couple of products. 

A check by SPONSOR-SCOPE of about 30 split-minute commercials disclosed that a sub- 
stantial percentage consisted of incompatible products, like a dog food and a deodorant 
soap or cold remedy and a roach powder. 

Inquire into the background of this and you'll likely find the intent is to (1) get a low- 
budgeted brand into tv at maximum efficiency and (2) obtain for a well-budgeted prod 
uct a maximum number of exposures. 

The split-minute commercial is not without its curious paradox. Many tv stations that re 
fuse a piggyback as an article of spot have no compunction about accepting the same twin 
commercial when channeled by the network. 

The agency credited with doing the mostest with the piggyback: Bates. 

For the first time in some years a grocery chain is buying a regular tv network 
scries, even though, in this case, it's just a west coast regional. 

The chain is Safewav Stores and the show, Sing Along with Mitch. The arrangement i- an 
alternate half-hour the week that Ballantine, also a regional, is on. 

There appears to be a revival of interest in color. 

The incident which sparked it was General Electric's announcement it would have 
color sets on the market in August. 

That would make the manufacturer enrollment (besides RCA, of course) Zenith, Mag- 
navox, Emerson, and GE. 

Estimate of color sets in use generally quoted: 750,000. 

JWT isn't far from making up for the loss of the Shell account. Just last week 
it picked up about $4 million additional from Lever and $1 million from Congoleum. 

The Lever billings, all out of K&E, splits up as $3.5 million for Handy Andy and about 
$500,000 for Spry. 

Another Lever product exit from K&E: Praise, figured this side of $1 million. 

The fact that its summer buying may have a lot to do with it, but a number of 
national accounts in asking for spot tv availabilities lately have tagged on bids for 
information on "section," or preemptible time, rates. 

If it weren't for the summer circumstance, which presupposes hosts of open spots for ma 
neuverability, these queries, sav some reps, might be considered as validating preemption 
rates. 

Or, to look at it another way, it may mean this method of buying will become a perma 
nent fixture in the rate structure. 

Last week Lipton instant tea via SSC&B included a query on "section" rales in il- ie- 
quest for a\ails, and the week before il was Welch Grape Juice i ManolT). 

Sales developers for a couple major reps made like firemen last week. 
\i the requests of their respective I hicago chapters the) hurried out from New York to 
give the hoys a hand at counterattacking some pitches competitive to spot tv. 

It serins thai a couple of important spot perennials were taking a too-absorbing look at 
eilhei network spot carriers or Sunday supplements or both. 

20 5PONSOK • 1 MAY Wbl 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



It took NBC TV to apply a TvQ wrinkle to the current speed-up for fall sales. 

The wrinkle is one that TvQ calls its attitude sweepstakes, which purports to test opin- 
ion by age, income and population groups as to what shows are likely to please the most 
people. 

Points out NBC TV : the three shows that came out with the best total audience score 
in TvQ's latest opinion roundup belong to that network; namely, Bonanza, Sing Along with 
Mitch and Wagon Train. 

But here's the rub: The aforesaid three are all sold out. Anyway, the sponsors are 
thereby reassured. 

There's a method to the added sales pressure being put on by ABC TV in be- 
half of the proposed 11:15-12:30 a.m. strip of re-runs for the fall. 

The network would like to latch on to a lot of takers quickly, because with a batch of con- 
tracts in hand it will be that much easier to pitch for clearances at the coming week's 
meeting of ABC TV affiliates. 

Sellers of ABC TV daytime are beating the drums because 10 accounts which 
regularly use the earlier hours to sell women are cross-plugging into Bandstand. 

The reason cited by the network is that Dick Clark's 1.8 viewers per set consists of 1.18 
women of all age categories. 

With ARB as the source, ABC TV splits up the audience composition for Bandstand thus: 
female teenagers and kids, .66; adult women, .52; male teenagers and kids, .41; adult 
males, .21. 

The core of NBC TV's latest daytime statistical foray is that new NTI data show 
that network delivering more homes per minute than either competitor. 

The figures cited are from the March report: NBC TV, 3,518,000; CBS TV, 3,494,000; 
ABC TV, 1,806,000. (The year before NBC TV was in second place.) 

ABC TV's taunts that it's the network of the young families has apparently got 
a rise out of NBC TV — at least Sunday nights. 

In pitching its fall array of programing from 6:30 to 10 p.m. NBC TV is accenting the 
thesis it's all primed to capture the younger families. 

Deemed one of the better program buys of the coming season is the Alcoa dra- 
matic series (ABC TV) with Fred Astaire as the m.c. 

The schedule breaks down to 14 half-hour originals and 15 hour originals, 12 of which 
will be repeated. The gross per half-hour show is $58,000 and the average for the hour pro- 
grams comes out $85,000 gross. Time and talent figures close to $30,000 per commer- 
cial minute. And that includes the cost of commercials. 

Lever executive v. p. Henry Schachte made a rather provocative comment last 
week while talking to SPONSOR about his company's plan to mix its nighttime net- 
work tv fare with public service programing. 

The decision to do this, noted Schachte, came rather hard, because of the cost efficiency 
advantage the move implied for competitors. 

Schachte sardonically pointed out that if a Lever purchasing agent paid a dollar more 
than P&G for a gross of toothpaste tubes or any other container he'd certainly stand a chance 
of losing his job. 

(See 24 April SPONSOR-SCOPE for details of Lever public service program plans.) 

1 MAY 1961 21 



^ 






SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The biggest rcscramble of station representation in the history of the business 
lias just about been completed, with the migration of 12 stations involving perhaps 
as much as S30-835 million in annual billings. 

CBS and NBC Spot Sales were the losers and the total number of stations garnered by 
each of the four reps were: Katz, 5, TvAR, 3. Harrington. Righter and Parsons, 2 and Blair 
I \ and Blair Associates, 1 each. (For more details see SPONSOR HEARS, page 58.) 

Vgency marketingmen who keep themselves close to the retail chains predict 
that the profit squeeze the supermarkets are now going through will force the lead- 
ers into diversifying their retailing interests. 

Considered a significant signpost in this regard: the purchase by Stop & Shop, a New 
England chain, of a group of five discount stores. 

As these marketers see it the supermarket chains have skimmed off the cream in add- 
ing one line, outside of groceries, after another, and to make progress — unless they chew up 
one another — the chains will have to move into other areas of retailing. 

Who's responsible for the slow progress made in the development of qualita- 
live research in tv? 

According to network research executives, a goodly share of the reason why there hasn't 
been more definitive data is because the agency people haven't insisted on it. 

Contends this source: the agencies have been putting the emphasis in their information 
quests on material like homes and costs-per-1,000 and, on the side, audience composition. 




% SETS 

IN USE 

15.9 


VIEWERS 

PER HOME 

1.4 


MEN 

% 

15 


WOMEN 

% 

42 


TEENS 
% 

4 


CHILDREN 

% 

39 


24.1 


1.5 


19 


56 


4 


21 


26.7 


1.5 


20 


60 


4 


16 


24.4 


1.5 


18 


59 


6 


17 


37.0 


1.9 


16 


31 


14 


39 


62.0 


2.2 


29 


36 


11 


19 


67.0 


2.2 


29 


41 


11 


19 


65.6 


2.1 


33 


45 


11 


11 


49.4 


1.9 


36 


50 


8 


6 



Here's an updated Nielsen breakdown of national audience composition, day 
and night, Monday through Friday: 

TIME 
OF DAY 

9-10 a.m. 
11-12 noon 
1-2 p.m. 
3-4 p.m. 
5-6 p.m. 
7:30-8 p.m. 
8:30-9 p.m. 
9:30-10 p.m. 
10:30-11 p.m. 

Period: second January 1961 NTI. Comment: The percentage of men tuned into day 
time this year was quite higher than the previous January. This likely reflected the tin 
employment situation 

One of the best-known media directors in the agency field last week made ar 
observation to SPONSOR-SCOPE that agency managements might find worthy o 
meditating over. 

Said he: "Every agency with nationally distributed products should be active in spot 
By keeping its finger in spot an agency maintains the sort of sensitivity to know when networ 
sbould be supplemented with local media and to move intelligently when necessary to in| 
sure potential sales or prop up a slipping market." 



For other news coverage in this issue: see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6 
Sponsor-Week, page 25; Sponsor Week Wrap-l p, page 60; Washington Week, page 55 
sponsor Hears, page 58; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 67; and Film-Scope, page 56. 



SPONSOR 



1 may 1961 






r^JM 



^mi 









x 







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'£$&«■ 



A.TEWAY south Carolina: 

The 257,961 people who make WIS-television's home market the state's larg- 
est metropolitan area (and a close second in the two Carolinas after a 
38.1% increase in the 1960 Census) give Channel 10 their major time and 
attention, not to say devotion. This adds up to a 78.5 share of audience, 
says ARB (March 1960). And throughout South Carolina, WIS-television's 
1526-foot tower, tallest in the South, delivers more of the state, more effectively 
than any other station. In short, South Carolina's major selling force is 



Wl S television 



IK'S 

"k, .A 



NBC/ABC — Columbia, South Carolina 

Charles A. Batson, Managing Director 

a station of THE BROADCASTING COMPANY OF THE SOUTH 

G. Richard Shafto, Executive Vice President 

WI S-television, Channel 10, Columbia, S.C. • WIS Radio, 560, Columbia, S.C. • WS FA-TV, Channel 12, Montgomery, Ala. / All represented by Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



i 

i 



By Any Yardstick 



die big on 



Takes the Measure 




WKRGW 



CHANNEL 5 MOBILE, ALA. 

Call Avery*Knodel, Representative 
or C. P. Persons, Jr., Qeneral Manager 



2-1 



SPONSOR • 1 MAY 1961 




1 May 1961 



Latest tv and 
radio developments of 
the week, briefed 
for busy readers 



SPONSOR-WEEK 



International Shoe keeps its $800,000 in tv spot 

FTC watching administered prices & false advertising 

Kennedy, Ribicoff, Minow to address 39th NAB convention 



COAX NEWSFILM POSES LEGAL HOTSEAT 



A legal hornets-nest may be in the offing for the tv 
networks on the inter-station news service front. 

Independent stations, it was learned from authorita- 
tive sources last week, are waiting for CBS TV to an- 
nounce at this week's affiliates meeting the start of its 
coaxial newsfilm feed service before they raise a ticklish 
problem for the networks. 

The question, as reported, will be along these lines: 
(1) Will the networks— NBC TV put this service into 
effect last February — offer coaxial films for local video- 
taping to an independent station in a market in which 
the service is not bought by the affiliate; (2) Would the 
networks be required, under the law, to make the service 
available in any event to affiliate and independent alike 
so long as the required price is met. 

SPONSOR-Week has learned that the networks are 
fully sensitive to the implications of the problem but 
that they are a long way from determining what their 
attitudes will be. 

Aside from the legal headthrobbing, up-to-the-minute 
coaxialing of news clips is regarded as one of the most 
revolutionary steps yet in tv news distribution. 

It makes it possible for local stations to rebroadcast 
pictorial material only an hour or two after the actual 
occurrence of the news event. 

It also provides a new dimension to local newscasting: 
today's news footage available to every market in the 
country on a same day basis. 

It is expected that when ABC TV has its 11 p.m. and 
6 p.m. news strips rolling it will also be in a position 
to provide such a syndicated service for its affiliates. 



Net affiliates set for pre-NAB meets 

Network affiliates will get their annual warmups 
for the big industry meet, the NAB convention in 
Washington starting next Monday. 

All three tv networks have affiliate gatherings 
schedule a la these dates and places: 

CBS TV: May 4-5. Waldorf-Astoria, New York 

ABC TV: May 7, Sheraton Park, Washington. 

NBC TV: May 7, Sheraton Park. Washington. 

The high points of each network agenda will be 
the fall program schedule, how it'll be promoted 
and the schedule's competitive prospects. 



ABC TVS 6 P.M. NEWS STRIP 
IS $5,750 PER QUARTER HOUR 

ABC TV is asking $5,750 gross per quarter hour for 
the 6 o'clock news strip it plans for fall. 

It's already got interest in the project from an insur- 
ance, a tire and a chemical account. 



St. Regis hunts avails four months ahead 

St. Regis Paper Co. (Cunningham & Walsh) is, obvi- 
ously, in a rush to get its annual pre-school campaign 
set quickly as possible for Nifty Binder notebook. 

The spot tv schedules don't start until the forepart of 
September, but reps were asked last week to gather 
forthwith their stations' availabilities. 



SPONSOR 



1 may 1961 



25 




v9a t/ie yfcnd oj JlitCk and '^foncy 



GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN 

HAYDN R. EVANS. General Manage' • Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY 



20 



SPONSOR • 1 MAI 1963 



1 May 1961/SP0NS0R-WEEK 



Campbell-Ewald completes social 
class study of tv audience 

The first comprehensive study of attitudes toward 
television by social classes has been completed for 
Campbell-Ewald. 

A series of 11 depth questionnaires in Chicago, Mason 
City, Philadelphia, Atlanta, San Francisco, Cincinnati, 
Oklahoma City, Worcester, and Louisville showed new 
trends. 

Tv continues to be an important force, but audiences 
are more discriminating towards programs. Upper class 
audiences rely least of all on the medium. Program 
settings have a pronounced influence on commercials. 

Mysteries, soap operas, adventure, comedy, news and 
documentaries are rising in estimate, while westerns, 
specials, and variety appeared generally in decline. 



NBC'S LEADERSHIP CLAIMS 

NBC TV's gross billings for January were $23 million. 
In April the network had 52 hours, 48 minutes of spon- 
sored time. NBC Radio showed an increase in March 
of 5 hours, 43 minutes, over February. 

In all of these reports, the latest available, NBC 
claimed leadership over CBS and ABC. 



KENNEDY, RIBICOFF, MINOW 
TO ADDRESS 39TH NAB 

President Kennedy is expected to speak briefly at 
the opening general meeting of the NAB convention 
on 8 May. 

Secretary Abraham Ribicoff will address the Wednes- 
day luncheon and FTT chairman Newton N. Minow will 
speak on Tuesday. 

Highlights of the four day management program will 
include a question-and-answer session with Minow and 
other FCC members, a labor clinic on contracts, a re- 
port on WBC's public service activity, observance of 
FM day (7 May), and reports on the NAB radio and tv 
codes. 



RCA & deep seas equipment at NAB 

Actual equipment used in the scientific explora- 
tion of space and the deep seas will be shown by 
RCA in its exhibit at the NAB convention next week. 

Advanced models, regarded as prototype of fu- 
ture cameras and tape recorders, will also be shown. 

The exhibit, part of RCA's $200,000 display in 
the ballroom of the Shoreham, will occupy 2,000 
square feet. 



DIXON: FTC VS. ADMINISTERED 
PRICES, FALSE ADVERTISING 

The two big targets of the FTC in the immediate 
future will be "administered prices" and "deceptive 
advertising," according to statements made by newly 
appointed FTC chairman Paul Rand Dixon on "Between 
The Lines" on WNTA-TV, New York, on 30 April. 

Leaving cases of conspiracy backed by evidence to 
the Justice Department, the FTC will pay special atten- 
tion to price hikes by industry leaders followed so 
quickly by competitors that "prices for all intents and 
purposes were the same as if they had met in a room 
and agreed," even though evidence of conspiracy was 
lacking. 



William R. Hesse elevated to 
Benton & Bowles presidency 

William R. Hesse is the new president of Benton & 
Bowles. Robert E. Lusk, B&B president since 1952, steps 
up from the presidency to become chairman of the 
board. 

Hesse has been B&B execu- 
tive v.p. since 1958. He joined 
the agency as v.p. and account 
supervisor in 1956 after eight 
years in a similar capacity at 
BBDO. 

Several months later he was 
elected to the board of direc- 
tors. In 1957 he was appointed 
a senior v.p., becoming executive v.p. the following year. 




William R. Hesse 



4-A's BRAKES $130,000 TV PR DRIVE 

A revised 4-A's public relations campaign has been 
limited to three objectives: 1) to execute a depth study, 
especially with thought leader groups, to determine the 
reasons for tv criticism, 2) to base the public relations 
program upon the determinations of such studies, and 
3) to immediately "reduce or eliminate from agency 
operations the things which lead to such criticisms" 
through an intensive interna! educational program. 



Educational group agrees "in principle 11 
with NTA on buying WNTA-TV, N. Y. 

A New York City citizen's group represented by 
NETRC has reached "agreement in principle" with NTA 
on the purchase of station WNTA-TV, New York, from 
NTA for $5,750,000. 

Final sale is expected this week. Broker is Howard 
Stark. NTA originally paid $5 million for the station. 



SPONSOR 



1 MAY 1961 



■ 




TWO MAJOR AWARDS HONOR WAGA-TV EDITORIALS! 

WAGA-TV, recent winner of the National Headliner Award 
for "consistently outstanding Editorials by a local TV sta- 
tion," has been named winner of a second major award for 
editorial excellence! A "First Award" from Ohio State Uni 
versity's Institute for Education by Radio-Television cites 
WAGA-TV for "programs illustrating television's unique 
communications function in developing informed citizens dur 
ing a national election year." Ohio State's American Exhibi- 
tion for Radio-TV is the oldest competition in broadcasting! 








famous on the local scene 
. . .for public service 



waga-tv 



THE STORER STATION IN ATLANTJ 



2j; 



sponsor • 1 \m 1961 



1 May 1961/SP0NS0R-WEEK 



Fairfax Cone on good ads 

(London): Fairfax Cone, speaking before the Regent 
Advertising Club of London, offered a simple rule for 
good advertising. 

"I believe that advertising should be done by us pre- 
cisely as we would like it done to us: clearly as to its 
promises, honestly as to its intentions, and with suffi- 
cient substance to allow each reader or listener or 
viewer to make up his own mind with regard to the 
proposition that is presented," he said. "Its single ap- 
peal — whether large or small — should be to reasonable 
self-interest." 



FIRMAN UP AT CBS RADIO SALES 

CBS Radio last week realigned its sales staff to carry 
out what it termed an expansion of client contacts. 
The reassignments: 

• William W. Firman became assistant national sales 
manager. 

• Cornelius V. S. "Neil" Knox, Jr., moved from the 
managership of the Detroit office to take over Firman's 
eastern sales manager spot. 

• Wayne Wilcox filled the niche that had been va- 
cated by Knox. 

• George H. Gallup, to L.A. from New York to the po- 
sition of Pacific Coast sales manager, with his prede- 
cessor, Craig Rogers, coming to New York. 



RTES ESTABLISHES OWN AWARDS 
FOR PROGRAMS, ACHIEVEMENTS 

Next October RTES will make the first of a series of 
its own awards on network and local New York televi- 
sion and radio. 

Awards for programs and achievements in the year 
ending this June will be made at that time. 

Besides program awards, achievement awards will be 
made for agency, advertiser, and news coverage accom- 
plishments. 



MCM's triple-the-profit on tv grosses 

Although tv constitutes only 13 cents on the dollar in 
MGM's gross, it comprises 40 per cent of MGM's over- 
all profit. 

In the 28 weeks ending March 1961 MGM's net income 
in tv was $6 million on $10 million gross. In film pro- 
duction and distribution outside tv it made $8 million 
on a $59 million gross. Hence non-tv film business was 
80% of MGM's gross but only 56% of its profit. 

The current lucrativeness of tv, however, was not 
quite as great as in 1960. Then MGM's $8 million tv 
gross led to $5 million net income, while its theatrical 
gross of $49 million produced but a $1 million profit. 



INTERNATIONAL SHOE OVERCOMES 
30-DAY SPOT CONFIRMATION 

(St. Louis): International Shoe Company, in obtaining 
confirmation from stations in 50 markets for its chil- 
dren's show schedules for fall 1961 and spring 1952, 
has overcome the "bugaboo" of the 30-day confirma- 
tion. 

The ISCO development was attained with the coopera- 
tion of St. Louis reps. It will enable the company to 
remain in spot and still attain marketing goals of spe- 
cial brand promotions and dealer tie-ins, all planned 
months in advance. 

James E. Muse, head of Katz in St. Louis, led a move- 
ment of reps to keep the $800,000 account from going 
network. Reps surveyed 80 markets for ISCO's pro- 
posal of four minute spots a week for at least four 
weeks for its juvenile brands. 



Alice Westbrook named woman of year 
by Women's Advertising Club of Chicago 

(Chicago): Alice Westbrook, v. p. and creative director 
of North Advertising, was named Advertising Woman of 
the Year by the Women's Advertising Club of Chicago 
for her contributions to tv advertising. 

Mrs. Westbrook's career or- 
bits around the Toni Company 
and its agencies. She joined 
Toni in 1947 as creative direc- 
tor and has been radio-tv pro- 
ducer and writer at Tatham- 
Laird and creative director on 
the Toni account at Edward 
H. Weiss. 

At North since 1956 she now Alice Westbrook 

heads a staff of 25 writers, art directors, and producers. 




NBC TV still a mystery on 40" break 

No word is yet available on what position NBC TV 
top brass will take toward the 40 second spot question 
at its affiliates' meeting next week. 

ABC TV has made no change of its announcement 
that it would expand nighttime breaks to 40 seconds. 
CBS TV stated it too would go to a 42 second break if 
any other network set the precedent. 



Thompson named in Branham expansion 

Jack Thompson, formerly of PGW Radio, has been 
appointed manager of sales development for Branham 
by Tom Campbell, who became Branham broadcast divi- 
sion head recently upon the retirement of Joe Timlin. 



SPONSOR 



1 may 1961 



More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 60 



■i 



I 



<#» 



& m 



xi 



Why Monkey with the Metro... 






The CHARLOTTE TV 
MARKET is First 
in the Southeast 
with 642,500 Homes* 



Charlotte 
City Limits 



** 



CHARLOTTE 
642,500 



H 



Fables have persisted for years about how to judge a 
market's size by the Standard Metropolitan Area concept. 
Savvy Monkeys see no metro, hear no metro, speak no 
metro — because they know that it's the total TV Homes delivered 
that counts! 

Speaking of delivering, WBTV reaches 55.3% more TV 
Homes than Charlotte Station "b".** 



• Television Magazine — 1961 
•* ARB 1960 Coverage Study— Average Daily Total Homes Delivered 



19 



.1 .i £ .1 Jl 



Miami 
561,500 




Atlanta 
535,300 




Louisville 
420,200 




New Orleans 
366,900 




Richmond 
267,200 



fc 



\> 



It 



It 



WBTV 



% 



CHANNEL 3 (^ CHARLOTTE/ jefferson standard broadcasting company 

30 SPONSOR • 1 MAY 1961 



SPONSOR 

1 MAY 19 6 1 



Can magazines match tv spot? 

Broadcast industry questions ability of regional editions 
to approach flexibility, frequency, penetration of spot tv 



r ragmentations, split runs, segmented circulation, 
regional inserts. Call it what you will, national 
magazines are trying harder and harder to look 
like spot tv. Any resemblance is mostly on paper, 
the broadcast industry says, and backs it with a 
wealth of facts, figures, and time-tested theories. 

Putting aside relative impact of the printed page 
versus live-action, sight-sound commercials, the 
industry questions magazines' attempt to emulate 
a medium that allows market-by-market campaign- 
ing, speedy exposure, unbounded frequency, and 
potential entry of approximately nine out of 10 
living rooms. And for these regional runs they're 
charging a premium above their national cost-per- 
thousand which in turn has steadily increased while 
spot tv's c-p-m has been moving ever downward, 
broadcasters assert, with research to prove it. 

To equal spot tv's ability to single out a given 
community, so vital in modern marketing, national 
magazines would, of course, have to offer space 
strictly for its circulation in that market. Thus far. 
the bulk of the 139 magazines currently in the 
regional-run game divide their circulation into five 
or six regions, but further fragmentation has been 
developing. The Saturday Evening Post, for in- 
stance, offers one-state buys — apparently an at- 
tempt to boost sagging lineage, off from 3,009.000 



Why magazines are selling 
circulation by the segment 

Percentage of increase in 1960 advertising 
investments above totals registered in 1957 

50 



40 



30 



20 



10 



($510) 



($805) 



I 



($938) 



SPOT TV 



NET TV 



MAGAZINES 



Dollar figures in parentheses are in millions, slum preliminary esti 
mates of 1960 advertiser investments 



NEW MONEY flowing to spot tv in recent 
years has motivated national magazines to 
counter with segmented circulation offers 



SPONSOR 



1 MAY 1961 



31 



National magazines bid for spot tv's swelling 
billings with onslaught of regional offerings 



in 1950 to 1,896,000 last year, ac- 
cording to lilt- H all St/i'i-t Journal. 

Reader's Digest comes about the 
closest to a resemblance to spot t\. 
at least in one market, with its met- 
ropolitan New York edition. This 
extreme of fragmentation evidently 
can be more trouble to a publisher 
than it's worth, as witness the Neu 
Yorker's abandonment of advertising 
limited to its metro area when na- 
tional business experienced a healthv 
rise. 

In resorting to regional inserts, na- 
tional magazines are aggravating one 
of their biggest problems — rising fixed 
costs. Heightened expense of paper, 
ink. mail, personnel, bulk distribu- 
tion, and art work already have 
pushed the medium's cost-per-thou- 
sand from $2.69 in 1949 to $3.77 in 
'59, based on ANA figures. (Spot tv's 
c-p-m dropped 40 r £ over the same 
period by Gallagher Report estimate. I 



Now, with the regionals, rates take 
another jump. For the luxun of lim- 
iting his Reader's Digest message to 
metropolitan New ^ ork an advertiser 
-bells out five dollars per 1.000 circu- 
lation, or 51 r/ ( more than a national 
advertiser in the publication. Premi- 
um payments for approaching, but 
nowhere near equaling, spot tv's abil- 
ity to pinpoint a market, are even 
higher for the Digest's North Central 
region ($5.10 per 1,000 or 61 ',' 
above the national c-p-m) and its 
Southwest zone ($5.10 or 60% high- 
er). 

Similarly with five other leading 
magazines whose rates for regional 
editions have been compared with na- 
tional charges by Leber & Katz, Inc. 
For Life the range is from 15% above 
the national c-p-m for its Middle At- 
lantic edition to a 43' < premium 
paid by the advertiser who buys 
Life's Southwest regional. 



One thousand Western or Central- 
Southern Esquire homes cosl >10.43, 
or 36% more than the national ad- 
vertiser in that publication paya 
Time charges a 20' ','< premium for 
each of its four regionals. For Bet- 
ter Homes & Gardens, the premiums 
range from lb" , for its Central zone 
to 33' ( down South. 

The regionals have been attracting 
progressivcK larger amounts of ad 
dollars. Approximately $48 million 
went into the new medium in 1959, 
with the figure mounting to an esti- 
mated 876 million last year. Some 
$50 million are said to have been 
earmarked for regional inserts the 
first half of this year, with the '61 
total expected to hit $100 million. 

In a few cases, this new magazine 
money can be traced from spot tv. 
The Tea Council switched its winter 
campaign from spot tv to regionals. 
The New Fngland Confectionerv Co. 
began retrenching on spol tv to add 
regional magazines in 1959, and is 
expected to sink nearly all of its ad 
dollars into the new print medium 
this year. Sunshine Biscuit. Appian 



IE 



High cost of national magazines' regional editions 



Magazine and no. of 
regional editions 



Circulation range of 
regional editions 



Range of 
cost-per-1,000 



Premium range for 
regional editions 



Esquire (4) 



115,000- 
290,000 



$ 8.76- 

$10.43 



15% • 
36% 



Time (4) 



340,000- 
930,000 



$6.73- 
$674 



20% 



Life (7) 



415,000- 
1,655,000 



$5.33- 
$6.63 



15% 

43% 



Better Homes 
& Card ons (4) 



825,000- 

2,055,000 



$4.52- 
$5.86 



18%- 
33% 



■leader's Digest (9) 



485,000- 
2,275,000 



$3.19- 
$5.00 



23%- 
61% 



Magazine flexibility costs money. The cost-per-thousand premiums paid by advertisers buying regional 
inserts in national magazines have been calculated by Leber & Katz. This aggravates rising cost problem 



; 






32 



-I'ONsni! 



i mvy i9e 



Way pizza and Chevron gas also have 
cut back on spot tv to use regional 
inserts. 

Such advertisers are moving money 
out of a medium present in more than 
eight out of 10 American homes. And 
during a typical week last year, Niel- 
sen found that 96.6% of those tv 
homes — or 43,211,000 households — 
were reached by tv. Viewing occu- 
pied 44 hours, 56 minutes in the aver- 
age tv home, Nielsen found. 

Contrast this with magazines, a 
medium estimated to escape 25-30% 
of all the people in the country com- 
pletely. TvB research indicates that 
one of the leading circulation publi- 
cations, Life, reaches fewer than five 
out of every 100 homes in one-third 
of the nation's counties, and gets to 
more than 30% of the homes only in 
.1% of the counties. On the other 
hand, the county least penetrated by 
tv is well over 40% tv saturated. 

Uppermost in the magazine sales 
pitch has been ever-mounting num- 
bers. They were content to report 
actual circulation during the earlv 
years of this century, when print 
reigned supreme. Then, in the thirties, 
when the first of the electronic media 
usurped billings, magazine research- 
ers invented "readership," an estimate 
of how many hands get ahold of each 
circulated copy. The latest step up 
the magazine numbers ladder has 
been measurement of ad page expo- 
sure. Business Week has stated that 
magazines lose this "numbers game" 
to tv. 

Tv, on the other hand, has seen fit 
to lower its numbers as they've be- 
come progressively more astronomi- 
cal. In the beginning total audience 
was the basis. Then six-minute audi- 
ence was measured to produce a more 
manageable "total." And. the latest 
basis, producing still smaller num- 
bers, is average audience per minute. 

There is a great deal of question 
as to the magazines' present-day 
methods of increasing their circula- 
tion to justify hiked ad rates. Good, 
old-fashioned newsstand circulation, 
generally acknowledged to be the 
most valuable from the advertiser's 
point of view, has been playing less 
and less a part. Findings in a recent 
survey were that newsstand share of 
total circulation, at 41.9% in 1949, 
had fallen to 26.8%. 



Magazine vs. tv penetration: no contest 



TOTAL SOUTH FLORIDA 

ncluding Retail Trading 




BASED ON the ARB Coverage Study— 1960, the net weekly circulation of WTVJ (TV), Miami, 
was more than three times greater than the monthly circulation of the area's most popular 
magazine, Reader's Digesf, Magazine circulation figures are based on publishers' statements. 
This station's figures reflect national estimates of television's penetration performance 



Another factor which detracts from 
magazines' circulation gains is the 
cut-rate prices at which most sub- 
scriptions and some newsstand copies 
are sold. Appealing to the bargain- 
hunting instinct does not appear to 
be an effective means to gain expo- 
sure for the advertiser's message. 
"Circulation without readership" was 
the phase employed in the New York 
Times explaining Colliers' demise. 

Regional advertisers tempted away 
from spot tv by the chance to gain 
"prestige" from advertising in a por- 
tion of a leading magazine's circula- 
tion, side by side with the giants, may 
be overlooking the fact that many of 
the giants have moved more and more 
of their ad dollars out of magazines 
and into tv. In many cases they're 
leaving some money in magazines for 
"secondary benefits." a luxury the 
smaller regional advertiser cannot af- 
ford if he has to relinquish the tv that 
provides the giants' main thrust. 

Far and away the prime example of 
an advertising giant's magazine cut- 
back and accompanying tv upsurge 
is Procter & Gamble. The company 



in 1956 spent $11,423,731 on maga- 
zines and $3,487,820 in spot tv. Last 
year, the magazine figure was down 
to $3,556,864, while P&G's spot tv 
expenditure zoomed to $55,084,440. 
And expectations are that P&G's mag- 
azine billings will not be noticeably 
higher, if at all. in the coming year. 

Another striking instance of in- 
creased emphasis on tv at the expense 
of magazines is Colgate-Palmolive. 
Back in 1956 C-P invested $4,776,036 
in magazines, $7,314,700 in spot tv. 
Colgate's magazine outlay dropped to 
$2,747,867 in 1960, accompanied by 
an $11,419,230 investment in spot tv. 

General Foods and Lever added 
somewhat to their magazine budgets 
while increasing their spot tv invest- 
ments enormously over the '56-'60 
period. American Home Products 
added much more to spot tv than 
magazines, as did American Tobacco. 

Budgetary changes such as these 
have been responsible for spot tv's 
heightened share of national adver- 
tising. While magazine's share fell 
between 1955 and 1960. spot tv in- 
creased its stake from 4.8 to 7°£. ^ 



SPONSOR 



1 MAY 1961 



33 



SRO SIGN IS OUT ON 65 OF 106 



N 



let work television schedule-mak- 
ers went into Ma\ with SRO signs 
displayed <>n 6195 (, f their nighttime 
fall programs— or 65 out of 106 — 
and with onlj 12' ', (13 shows) lack- 
ing an\ spi'iis«n> at all. Note that sev- 
eral of these may he transferred to 



other time slots or removed from the 
charts b) the third week in Septem- 
ber when the season starts. 

There were, at presstime, 33 new- 
shows listed for fall premieres, in- 
cluding revised NBC Disnev and De- 
tectives formats. I he two shows will 



be moving over from their ABC slots. 
Of the 33 new shows. 19 have al- 
ready been sold out: six of 12 on 
ABC. seven of nine on CBS. and six 
of 12 on NBC. CBS enjoys a com- 
plete sellout on Sundays from 7-11 
p.m.. and on Mondays and Fridavs 





SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


AB 

THE R 

(9 : 

(Alter 

THE ) 
(10, 


7:30 


FOLLOW 

THE 

SUN 
(9/17) 

Kaiser 

A 


SRO 

DENNIS THE 
MENACE 

Best Foods; 
Kellogg 

Sc 


SRO 

WALT 

DISNEY'S 

WONDERFUL 

WORLD 
OF COLOR 
Eastman-Ko- 
dak; RCA 

Various- 
Col 


THE 

CHEYENNE 

SHOW 

i<) 25i 

Miles; P&G; 

Amer Tobacco; 

Bristol-Myers 

W 


SRO 

TO TELL 
THE TRUTH 

R. J. Reynolds; 
Amer Home 

P 


THE 
AMERICANS 

Union Carbide 

A 


BUGS BUNNY 

1 Ht/10) 
General Foods 

Ac 


MARSHAL 
DILLON 

W 


LARAMIE 

Union Carbide; 
R. J. Reynolds 

W 


8:00 


SRO 

THE 

ED SULLIVAN 

SHOW 

Colgate; 

P. Lorillard; 

Revlon 

V 


PETE 
AND GLADYS 

Carnation 

Sc 


SRO 

BACHELOR 
FATHER 
(10/3) 

Amer Tobacco; 
Armour 
Sc 


SRO 

DOUBLE 

TROUBLE 

IDick Van Dyke) 

Procter & 

Gamble 

Sc 


8:30 


SRO 

LAWMAN 
i 10/1 I 

Whitehall; 
R. J. Reynolds 

W 


SRO 

CAR 54, 

WHERE 

ARE YOU? 

Procter & 
Gamble 

A 


SRO 

RIFLEMAN 
(10/2) 

Procter & 
Gamble 

W 


SRO 

WINDOW ON 
MAIN STREET 

(Robert Young) 
Scott Paper; 
Toni 
Sc 


SRO 

THE PRICE 
IS RIGHT 

P. Lorillard 

Aud-Col 


SRO 

CALVIN 
AND THE 
COLONEL 
1 10/3 i 

Whitehall; 
Lever Ac 


D0BIE 
GILLIS 

Philip Morris 

Sc 


SRO 

ALFRED 
HITCHCOCK 
PRESENTS 

Ford 

My 


TOP 

Kelt 
Bristol 


9:00 


BUS STOP 

i 10/1 1 
Brown & 
Wmson; Al- 
berto Culver; 
Singer 

Dr 


SRO 

GE THEATRE 

General 
Electric 

Dr 


SRO 

BONANZA 

Chevrolet 

A-Col 


SRO 

SURFSIDE 

6 
(10/2) 

J&J; Armour; 

Brown & 

Wmson; 

Noxzema; 

Pontiac; 
Union Carbide 

A 


SRO 

DANNY 

THOMAS 

SHOW 

General Foods 

Sc 


87TH 
PRECINCT 

Liggett & 
Myers 

A 


THE NEW 

BREED 

(10/3) 

J&J; Scott; 

Miles; 

Brown & 

Williamson 

A 


SRO 

ICHAB0D 

Quaker Oats; 
P&G 

Sc 


DICK 
POWELL 
MYSTERY 
THEATRE 

Reynolds 
Metals 

My 


HAW** 

Alberto^ 


9:30 


SRO 

THE 

JACK BENNY 

PROGRAM 

State Farm 
Mutual; Lever 
C 


SRO 

ANDY 

GRIFFITH 

SHOW 

General Foods 

Sc 


SRO 

THE 

RED SKELTON 

SHOW 

S. C. Johnson 

C 


P. Lo| 
Amer 1 
CarterJ 
hall; r i 


10:00 


ADVENTURES 

IN 

PARADISE 

1 10 1 1 

Armour 

A 


SRO 

CANDID 
CAMERA 

Bristol- 
Myers; Lever 

C 


SRO 

THE 
DUP0NT 

SHOW 
OF THE 

WEEK 
(9/17) 
DuPont 

Dr-PA 


BEN 
CASEY 

(?) 
A 


SRO 

HENNESEY 

General Foods; 
P. Lorillard 

Sc 


THRILLER 

Amer Tobacco; 
Sterling; 
Colgate 

My 


SRO 

ALCOA 
PREMIERE 

(10/10) 

Aluminum Co. 
of America 

(Bell & Howell 
Close-Ups on 
various dates) 

Dr-PA 


THE 

GARRY MOORE 

SHOW 

(10/3) 

R. J. Reynolds; 
S. C. Johnson 

V 


CAIN'S 

100 
(9 12 I 

P. Lorillard 

A 


NAD 
CI 

I 10 1 

Bro 
Wmsi 
Spartt 
Brisk*- 

Bee* 
Amei 1 


10:30 


SRO 

WHAT'S 

MY 

LINE? 

Allstate 
Sunbeam; 
P 


I'VE GOT 
A SECRET 

P 



tbbn i latli ns undei program title 
BRO compli '<1\ -nM 



nun comedy; V— variety; Dr — drama; r —comedy; P — panel; My— mytti 



;;i 



SPONSOR 



1 MAY 196 



WEB NIGHTTIME FALL SHOWS 



from 7:30-11 p.m. NBC is sold out 
Sundays from 7:30-11 p.m. and 
Wednesdays from 7:30-10:30 p.m. 
ABC is SRO on Thursdays from 8-11 
p.m. and on Fridays from 7:30-8 and 
8:30-11 p.m. 

Six network shows are not shown 



on the chart below. Maverick, ABC's 
6:30 entry for Sundays, has no spon- 
sors committed. Lassie, on CBS at 7 
p.m. Sundays, is sold out to Camp- 
bell Soup; NBC's 7 p.m. Sunday 
show, has no sponsors as yet. 

Two other ABC shows are SRO. 



They are Expedition ( Ralston Puri- 
na I at 7 p.m. Mondays and Molly's 
Funday Funnies ( Mattel. Inc. i at 7 
p.m. Saturdays. NBC's The Bull- 
winkle Show (in color and animated) 
has been sold to General Mills for 
6:30 Sunday telecasts. ^ 



:dnesday 



3S 



NBC 



SRO 

ALVIN 

ow 

I Foods: 
al Toy 

Ac 



HER 
]WS 

:st 

uns) 
'Ward; 
ott 
Sc 



KMATE 
My 



SRO 

IER IS 
SHMAN 

deBerg) 
I Foods 



SRO 

IS 

EEL 

IUR 



mate) 

SRO 

TRONG 
ICLE 
ATRE 
Dr 



SRO 



WAGON 
TRAIN 

R. J. Reynolds 

Nt'l Biscuit; 

Ford 



W 



SRO 

JOEY BISHOP 
SHOW 

P&G; Amer 
Tobacco 

Sc 



SRO 



PERRY 
C0M0 

(10/4) 
Kraft 



V-Col 



SRO 

THE 

BOB NEWHART 
SHOW 

Sealtest 



DAVID 

BRINKLEY'S 

JOURNAL 

R. J. Reynold: 
(?) 

PA 



THURSDAY 



ABC 



CBS 



NBC 



ABC 



FRIDAY 



CBS 



NBC 



OZZIE & 
HARRIET 

( 9/28 ) 

Sc 



SRO 

THE 

DONNA REED 

SHOW 

(9/28) 
J&J; Campbell 
Sc 



SRO 

THE 
REAL McCOYS 

I 9/28 1 

Procter & 

Gamble 



SRO 

MY 

THREE SONS 

( 9/28 ) 

Chevrolet 

Sc 



SRO 

MARGIE 
(10/12) 
Procter & 

Gamble 

Sc 



SRO 



THE UNTOUCH 

ABLES 

(10/12) 

B. Williams 
Armour; Miles 
Beecham; Al- 
berto Culver 



FRONTIER 
CIRCUS 



W 



SRO 

BOB 

CUMMINGS 

SHOW 

B&W; Kellogf 

Sc 



THE INVESTI- 
GATORS 



CBS 

REPORTS 



PA 



THE 
OUTLAWS 

Union Carbide 
Brown & 
Wmson 



W 



SRO 



DR. 
KILDARE 

Colgate; 
Sterling; 
Liggett & 
Myers; 
Singer; 
Warner- 
Lambert 



Dr 



SRO 

HAZEL 

(Shirley Booth) 
Ford 

Sc 



SRO 



SING ALONG 

WITH MITCH 

P. Ballantine; 

Buick; R. J. 

Reynolds; 

Safeway 



M-Col 



SRO 

THE 
RACER 

( 10/6 1 
Autolite 



THE 
HATHAWAYS 

( 10/6 1 
Ralston Purina 



SRO 

THE 
FLINTSTONES 

(9/29) 
Miles; R. J. 
Reynolds Ac 



SRO 

77 

SUNSET 

STRIP 

(10/13) 

Whitehall; 

Beecham; 
Amer Chicle; 
R. J. Revnolds 
P&G 



SRO 



THE 
CORRUPTORS 

( 9/29 ) 
P. Lorillard; 
Union Carbide 
Alberto Cul- 
ver; DuPont; 
Lever 



SRO 



RAWHIDE 

Drackett; 
Philip Morris; 
Bristol-Myers; 
Colgate; Gen- 
eral Foods; 
Nabisco 



W 



SRO 



ROUTE 
66 

Philip Morris 

Chevrolet; 

Sterling 



SRO 

FATHER 
OF BRIDE 

( 9/29 ) 
General Mills; 
ampbell Soup 
Sc 



SRO 

TWILIGHT 
ZONE 

Colgate; 
Liggett & 
Myers 
Dr 



EYEWITNESS 

TO HISTORY 

PA 

or 
WAY OUT 

Dr 



CARNIVAL 
TIME 

7-Uo 



CAPTAIN 

OF 

DETECTIVES 

Colgate; 

Brown & 

Williamson 



SRO 

THE BELL 

TELEPHONE 

HOUR 

AT&T 
M-Col 

(Alternate) 

DINAH 
SHORE 

Amer Dairy 

V-Col 



PUBLIC 
AFFAIRS 

Gulf oil Vi (?: 



SATURDAY 



ABC 



CB5 



NBC 



THE 

ROARING 

20'S 

(10/11) 
A 



LEAVE IT 
TO BEAVER 

I 9/30) 
Ralston 



SRO 



THE 

LAWRENCE 

WELK 

SHOW 

(10/71 
J. B. Williams-, 
Union Carbide 



M 



SRO 

THE 

FIGHT 

OF THE 

WEEK 

(10/71 
Gillette 

Sp 



MAKE THAT 
SPARE 

Brown & 
Williamson 
Sp 



SRO 



PERRY 
MASON 

Philip Morris; 

Colgate; 

Drackett; 

Sterling; 
H. C. Moores 



My 



SRO 



THE 
DEFENDERS 

Lever; Kimber 

ly Clark; 

Brown & 

Williamson 



SRO 

HAVE GUN, 
WILL TRAVEL 

Lever; 
Whitehall 

W 



SRO 



GUNSMOKE 

S. C. Johnson 

Remington 

Rand; Liggett 

& Myers; Gen 

eral Foods 



W 



TALES OF 
WELLS 
FARGO 

Amer Tobacco 



W 



TALL MAN 

R. J. Reynolds 



W 



SATURDAY 

NIGHT 

FEATURE 

R. J. Reynolds; 
Noxzema; 

Union 
Carbide; 

Thos. 
Leeming; 
Maybelline 
Fm 
part-Col 



iiiniiKitci] comedy; PA — public affairs; M — music; Sp — sports; Fm — feature movies; Aud — audience participation; Col- 






SPONSOR 



1 MAY 1961 



35 



MARKETING GAMBLE 
PUT ROMAN ON TOP 

^ New Jersey firm's frozen Italian foods once lagged 
in sales with wide distribution, not enough advertising 

^ But, a pull-back to one market, New York, and a 
well placed spot tv-radio drive, made Roman No. One 



l^iniiii: the past year, while pizza 
was busy graduating from the cam- 
pus to the kitchen. Roman Products, 
a South Hackensack, N. J., producer 
of Italian food specialties, was enjoy- 
ing hypoed sales as a result of a new- 
ly incorporated spot tv campaign. 

Roman, a spot radio and print ad- 
vertiser for the past eight or nine 
years, transferred 70 r < of its six 
figure ad budget to tv last fall, "and 
the results have been terrific." 

The success of Roman Products is 
a story of what can happen to a com- 
pany when its entire sales, distribu- 
tion and advertising efforts are re- 
vamped. 

Roman began producing frozen 
food specialties in the late 10's. Al- 



though at that time it had distribu- 
tion in a number of important mar- 
kets, it was virtually unknown wher- 
ever it was sold. The company did 
\er\ little advertising. 

In 1952, when the Roman account 
went to Smith/Greenland, New York, 
the food producer's biggest problem 
was that it was selling in many cities 
throughout the country necessitating 
high shipping and warehousing costs. 

The agency's first recommendation 
was that Roman stop its wide distri- 
bution and concentrate its selling and 
advertising in one market only. 
New York was selected. 

At the beginning, S/G used radio 
and newspapers only for Roman. 
There were heavy merchandising tie- 



ROM AN PRODUCTS' spot tv and radio campaigns have sparked the Italian food specialty 
line to the top in New York and Philadelphia. Here Leo Greenland, president, Smith Green- 
land (Roman's agency) and Les Towne, S G account executive on Roman, scan storyboard 




iiis with all stores and chains stock- 
ing the Roman lines. Sales increase 
steadily and so did the advertising 
budget. In the beginning, S/( 
bought into many of the major Nev 
York disc jockey names, such as Jacli 
Lacev. Klaven & Finch, and Martii 
Block. 

The emphasis was on saturation. 
The agency adopted a technique it 
hadn't used before, that is. buying a 
station one day a week, with 15-20 
spots during the day. The day se- 
lected was usually Thursday or Fri- 
day, those being the most popular 
food shopping days. 

"We believed radio had loyal lis- 
teners and we were bound to catch 
them before shopping day with this 
kind of frequency and unduplica- 
tion," said Leo Greenland, president 
of the agency. 

This radio strategy boosted Roman 
sales and enabled the producer to go 
into a second market soundly in 
1956. Philadelphia was chosen and 
the same techniques were applied. 

During these radio-using years, 
there was heavy emphasis on mer- 
chandising tie-ins and demonstration 
campaigns. Supervising these proj- 
ects were Joseph Settineri, president 
of Roman Foods, covering New York, 
and Paul Carr, Roman vice president, 
in Philadelphia. On this project, 
Carr worked closely with the Gav H. 
Pryor organization, the company's 
food broker. 

Last summer, it was decided that 
Roman was ready for an intensive 
approach to television. Up until 
then. Smith/Greenland had experi- 
mented with teenage tv shows, such 
as the Hi Lilt Dance Party on 
WNTA-TV, New York, in 1959. 

The stations chosen for Roman's 
intensive entrance into tv in the fall 
of 1960 were WCBS-TV in New York 
and WFIL-TV and WCAU-TV ii 
Philadelphia. 

Why these stations? "It is the 
agency's philosophy, when using tele 
vision, to aim for a broad audience 
rather than the frequency which yoi 
gel from radio at a much more effi 
cient cost. At the time we did oui 
buying, these stations had the bes 
availabilities for reaching the broad 
est possible market and the larges 
number of unduplicated homes on at 
economical basis," said account ex 



36 



SPONSOR 



I MAY 1961 



A family squabble on ravioli's virtues sparks a Roman spot 





My mother never served me any- 
thing but fresh ravioli 



ANNCR: Roman Ravioli is frozen fresh. 
Freezing keeps that home-made Risotta 
cheese filling fresh and delicious . . . 




Serve it with butter and cheese. 




MAN, Meat, please 
WOMAN: Cheese! 




MAN: Chee — Okay, you win. We'll have 
both Roman Cheese and Meat Ravioli 




ANNCR: And try these other Roman 
products: Manicotti, Lasagna, Cavatelli 



These frames aie excerpts from a Roman 60-second spot. Photos by U. S. Tele- Service. 

llllllllllllllllll Illlllll HI Illl Blllll II H Illllllllllll 



ii: 1 mm 1 .iii:i. ; .nin ..: .: ! M' ■ :;:M : mm i :■,,; i in:: iiiin .ni:: ..mm .m:,;- mm". ; .mim ^.:,ii- ::i" .. iii:: 1 .i[7m 



jcutive Les Towne. 

The tv buying was concentrated in 
ninutes and 20-second spots. They 
/fere bought during all hours of the 
schedule to reach a certain number 
)f rating points for daytime and 
evening programing. The agency felt 
t could get more mileage out of the 
aroper spot buys, and has, up to now, 
stayed away from buying a local 
show. 

The buying is done in seven or 
sight week flights. 

How does the agency measure the 
effectiveness of its spot tv drive? 
'We just look at our sales," said 
Greenland. Roman Food specialties 
ire now in Hartford. New Haven and 
Bridgeport as well as New York and 
Philadelphia and the line is number 
me in all those markets. "Our sales 
lave responded dramatically when 
advertising is put behind the line," 
Greenland commented. 



When Roman products went on tv, 
the agency recognized the fact that 
many people in the grocery business 
didn't understand all the problems of 
putting on a commercial. A grocery 
industry tv seminar was organized. 

Dealers and buyers were invited to 
meet agency heads and then taken on 
a tour of all of CBS TV facilities in- 
cluding studios, tape facilities, news 
broadcasting, rehearsals, editing, 
scenery warehouses. 

Roman products is run by Joseph 
and Cyrus Settineri, president and 
secretary-treasurer respectively. "The 
company has prospered because of 
its aggressive approach to marketing 
and its willingness to try new things 
in advertising," Greenland opined of 
his client. 

Will Roman be spreading its 
wings? "Definitely, when we feel we 
can go into other markets soundly 
and back the distribution with the 



proper amount of advertising," 
Greenland said. 

At present Roman is on tv and in 
some newspapers. It just completed 
its radio cycle and is now consider- 
ing a summer flight. Although pizza 
and ravioli are not usually thought 
of as hot weather specialties, the 
agency contends that "the fall-off 
during summer isn't as dramatic as 
you might think. People respond to 
the advertising when we aggressively 
promote it," said Greenland. Radio 
was continued through last summer. 

Roman's commercials are all hu- 
morous or semi-humorous. The tv 
spots, of which there are two minute 
commercials, two 20-second spots, and 
six I.D.'s, feature live performers, 
and some demonstration about the 
variety of ways to prepare the prod- 
ucts. 

One of the ravioli spots, for in- 
( Please turn to page 50) 



SPONSOR 



1 MAY 1961 



37 




Smaller agencies say these rep services could be improved 



THE SERVICE 



HOW IT CAN BE IMPROVED 



AVAILABILITIES 



MOST important needs outlined by buyers at agencies surveyed by National 
Advertising Agency Network related to availabilities. Many buyers said they 
wanted audience composition submitted automatically with each availability. 
They also want ratings of competitive adjacencies, which are seldom offered. 



COVERAGE DATA 



WHILE most of the timebuyers queried made clear they do not expect reps to 
supply data on coverage of competing stations, about a third indicated they 
do not get complete coverage data on individual stations supplied regularly 
or on an up-to-date basis. Another third would like more coverage details.. 



COST FIGURES 



COST data on availabilities was mentioned often in the survey as a common 
problem area. The main problem seemed to be that the data was hard to un- 
derstand. Buyers said they wanted the figures broken down so they can be 
read more easily and quickly. Facts like talent charges were often left out. 



WHAT BUYERS WANT OF REPS 



^ Survey of the smaller agencies active in spot tv 
discloses some dissatisfaction with avail information 

^ Facts were garnered by National Advertising Agency 
Network from among 62 agencies located in five cities 



I hough the spot tv timebuyer at 
the -mailer agenc) doesn't require as 
much service from reps as his col- 
league at the giant advertising houses 
in New l ork and Chicago, his de- 
mands for qualitv of service are jusi 
as high. 

This was brought out in a recent 
five-citj survej conducted l>\ the Na- 
tional Advertising Vgencj Network 
among 02 agencies, which, though 
not among the top -hops in billings, 
spend a substantial ratio of their ad 
monies on spot t\ . 

The NAAN, a group of indepen- 
dently-owned agencies which ex- 
change or pool their advertising 
knowledge and lake on jobs for each 



other, found that huyers wanted the 
following: 

• Audience composition for each 
availability submitted. 

• Ratings of competitive adja- 
cencies. 

• More complete station coverage 
data. 

• Standardization of rating infor- 
mation. 

• Easj -to-understand cost data. 
The timebuyers express no major 

discontent with tv reps in general, ac- 
cording to the findings. Most huyers 
indicated thev were serviced well or, 
at least, adequately by the reps. 

The chief purpose of the NAAN 
survej was to determine — from a 



timebuyer's point of view — the ade 
quacv of two hasic kinds of infor 
mation supplied h\ t\ stations ai 
their representatives: I 1 i data on t 
station in general, and (2) data pre 
\ided with specific availability 
Queried on such aspect- ol t\ -|» 
buying a- station coverage data, ai 
dience figures, rates, and market -t; 
tistics, buyers not onl) responded 
specific questions, hut offered thei 

how 
bag might he improved. 

The agency network, witli afnliab 
in 10 major markets and a combine 
staff of over 1.(100. repaid- it- survtf 
as a "pilot."' and recommend- at lea 
a doubling in the number of inte 
views before the conclusions could 
regarded as definitive. 

Two suggestions stood out amoi 
those aimed at easing the complei 
ties of spot buving. Buvei- want* 
reps to include automatically, wh< 
submitting availabilities, audien 
composition for each avail and n 
{Please turn to page 50) 



38 



SPONSOR 



I M\Y 1< 



5 BASIC SPOT RADIO TACTICS 



* While spot radio buying emphasis today is on varied 
ledia strategy, five basic approaches appear to prevail 

* Most widely-used and most basic are the blitz, the 
ight, 52-week exposure, vignettes, alternate week buys 



N 



ith more and more emphasis 
;ing placed on media strategy in 
»ot radio buying, the varied ap- 
roaches, preferred time, and buying 
itterns of advertisers and agencies 
id the sales plans of stations and 
^presentatives, keep agency planners 
l their toes. There are countless 
ays in which the flexible medium 
in be oriented to suit certain budg- 
s, problems, etc. 

sponsor has singled out five ap- 
roaches to the medium. They are 
mong the most basic of spot radio's 



strategies. These are the blitz, the 
flight, 52-week exposure, vignettes or 
news programs, and alternate week 
buys. 

It is almost universal practice to- 
day, however, for most spot radio 
advertisers to use a combination or 
variety of techniques. Very often, 
for example, the sponsor of a five- 
minute daily news show, such as 
Tareyton cigarettes, will also back 
intensive flights several times a year. 

One of the newest approaches to 
buying "in-depth" is for the sponsor 



to buy a market — rather than a sta- 
tion — in depth. This way he reaches 
the rotating as well as the cumulative 
audience of each station used in his 
schedule. 

Although the vignette has become 
a very popular buy in the last several 
years, the newscast is still a highly 
sought after commodity. However, 
what many clients have been discover- 
ing lately is that there aren't enough 
traffic time newscasts available. 

Why newscasts? For one thing, 
these programs get good attention 
and therefore the commercial is 
bound to get more attention. Since 
newscasts are generally bought on a 
long-term basis, they are often backed 
up by blitz' during the year, especial- 
ly in the case of a national advertiser 
like Tareyton. 

The attention getting factor is not 
the only attractive one in buying 






fere's how five clients use different spot radio strategies 



tlitz 

r artin Theatres 



THIS 100-HOUSE southeastern theatre chain believes in saturation to get all the new and re- 
newed movie-goers up to the box office. Buying is done between 7-9 p.m. and 5-7 p.m. Spots 
are bought on about 80 stations, about 10-15 spots per day per station, are bought. 



lights 

hun King Sales 



CHUN KING, a Chinese food line began using spot in 30 markets last October. Chun King's 
flights run in groups of 3-4 weeks, then out for a few weeks. Minutes and 30-second spots are 
used in traffic times to reach family together. Fifty-75 spots bought weekly in larger markets. 



2-week 

hultons Old Spice 



OLD SPICE buys a basic 52-week schedule during early morning traffic periods in 10 major 
markets, and complements it with a 36-week campaign in 16 additional cities during peak 
tune-in morning time periods and a 32-week drive in top 48 markets, weekends only. 



ignettes 

hef Boy Ar Dee 



THIS ITALIAN food products company makes use of one five-minute vignette on several sta- 
tions, among which are WIS Columbia, S. C, and WPTF Raleigh, N. C. Vignettes are usually 
sold at a station's minute rate and they are packaged out at so many per week at flat rate. 



lit. Week 

els Products 



BY BUYING SPOTS on an alternate week basis, this advertiser concentrates the normal two- 
week order in one week. Fels does this in flights of 10 alt. wks. over 20 weeks, twice a year. 
Reasons: increased frequency on the given air time, and builds weekly cumulative audience. 



PONSOR 



1 may 1961 



39 




HERE ARE two products which apply varied spot radio approaches. Chock Full o' Nuts has 
dual objectives — introductory drives in new marketing areas, heavy-up saturation in established 
markets. Kitchens of Sara Lee combines spot with network, revolves strategy around 'soft-sell' 



news programs. The fixed position is 
often sought after because of the 
habit audience it hits. 

On the other side of the coin, buy- 
ing on a rotating basis, say between 
6-9 p.m.. gives an advertiser a large 
turnover, but a potentially tremend- 
ous cume. 

Just as radio programming 1ms 
changed continually over the years, 
selling techniques must also change. 
Just 10 short years ago, prime radio 
time was still nighttime. Slowly but 
surely early morning became the most 
popular and successful buy. thus 
taking on prime time rates. 

Today, main reps predict that late 
night radio is soon to catch on as an 
attractive buy. One in particular is 
on the verge of selling 11 p.m. news- 
casts to a decafinated coffee adver- 
tiser. 

"They il be catching a guy when 
he's gone I" bed." said the rep. "He's 
tossing and turning and the radio is 
telling him he should have tried de- 
cafinated coffee before retiring." 

Of course, the rales are ver\ at- 
tractive during this time, as they are 
in early morning periods on week- 
ends, and between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. 
daily. During the latter period, it 
has been discovered that there is a 
significant automobile flow. 

L "ln radio i < x!a% we have t<> gen- 
erate more idea- to sell with than 
evei before, commented Lee > anden- 
I landel. eastern -ales manager, Petei s, 



Griffin. Woodward. He also pointed 
out that very often it is the smaller 
local advertiser who usually leads the 
way in new buying trends. 

"These advertisers rarely rely on 
ratings information. They measure 
the success of their spot buys in cash 
register reactions," he said. 

Summer time is also attracting 
many more advertisers. There is one 
southwestern insurance company for 
example which only buys radio dur- 
ing summer months because of bea\ \ 
car audiences. 

But. as BBDO v. p., media director 
Herb Maneloveg recently told spon- 
sor, "every product, every client is 
different. There are dozens of ways 
to use spot radio." 

Spot radio is cost efficient. A tv 
advertiser might spend $105,000 per 
week for a nighttime network show. 
This same expenditure will buy over 
50 radio spots per week in the top 
100 markets. 

Here are some other example